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Old 07-30-2009, 03:30 PM
 
Location: southern california
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vicksburg MS, a slow death over 50 years.
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Old 07-30-2009, 05:55 PM
 
Location: By the lake
184 posts, read 525,702 times
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Chicago's population will be on the rise once they the Census finds out the real population in 2010. Chicago is still one of the major destination cities for immigrants from all over the world who are looking to live the American Dream. It's not that easy to say Chicago is declining population when you see new construction everywhere around and in the city. Chicago will easily get 3,000,000 by the year 2001.
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Old 07-30-2009, 06:06 PM
 
63,701 posts, read 89,174,860 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
Good description. I actually don't ever remember being in North Utica.

South Utica is actually very nice. I love that area. My grandparents live near the intersection of Oneida and Higby and the area is beautiful. The homes are kept very well and are generally old homes that have been revovated. It feels like an actualy city there, not a rural place, because the lots are good sized, but there area still neighbors very close. It is mostly old people though, so there will be many homes for sale soon.

Yeah, Proctor Park is nice. The area by UFA (now some old folks home) is downright crappy.

The downtown isn't so hot, but is making a comeback. Utica is definitely on the verge of a boom, though. The Bosnians are completely changing the makeup of the city and are restoring it to its previous beauty in Utica's heyday. Maybe I'll settle there someday if it makes a turn for the better.
I think so too. Actually, Bosnians make up about 10% of the city's population. So, they will most likely play a big part in Utica trying to make a comeback.

Syracuse has actually gone from a peak of 220,000 in 1950 to about 138,000 now. At least the metro has held steady since the 1970's.
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Old 07-30-2009, 06:08 PM
 
63,701 posts, read 89,174,860 times
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Originally Posted by Jeromeville View Post
I dunno about Syracuse not dying. The population just recently fell below 150,000. It used to be upwards of 200,000. However, Syracuse still remains the regional hub of a fairly wide area.
True and it is an area in transition from manufacturing to health care, education, green and high tech industries as well. So, I think it is a matter of time before things turn around again.
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Old 07-30-2009, 06:13 PM
 
63,701 posts, read 89,174,860 times
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Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
Something else to think about with that kind of population decline is that, in 1950, most households were filled with people: Mom, Dad, a couple kids, and maybe even a grandparent. Now, those same households often consist of empty nesters, young single people, or couples w/o kids. (because everyone knows that you must move to the suburbs when you have kids in the U.S.) Some might even argue that many of these cities were overcrowded in 1950.
Good point and suburbanization was just starting around that time.

Then, we have to factor in some shady practices by some in the real estate industry didn't help either.
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Old 07-30-2009, 06:14 PM
 
63,701 posts, read 89,174,860 times
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Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
You raise some good points. In addition, there were no urban freeways. When they were built in the 50s, 60s and 70s, they demolished entire neighborhoods. Also, the federal "slum clearance" programs of the 50s and 60s destroyed lots of housing. In downtown Minneapolis, the Gateway District housed about 40,000 people, mostly transient workers and alcoholics in less than 1 square mile. Today, the area is a sprawl of parking lots, bland non-residential commercial architecture and parking garages. Don't know the population, but I'd guess way less than 1,000 now.
Yes, how could I forget about "urban renewal"......
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Old 07-30-2009, 06:37 PM
 
5,969 posts, read 8,190,219 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BPerone201 View Post
Camden, NJ

Peak population- 124,560
Present Population- 78,680
I agree that there are areas of Camden that are severe dispair. However Camden is far from being dead. I would not consider a city with a major state university and medical institutions, a thriving waterfront, luxury condos, rail and light rail service, major arena, and a baseball team to be a city that is dieing.

Camden Waterfront

Victor Lofts

Susquehanna Bank > Susquehanna Bank Center - Live Nation Event Calendar

Camden Riversharks - riversharks.com

Home | Rutgers University | Camden

About Us | Cooper University Hospital - South Jersey, New Jersey & Philadelphia
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Old 07-30-2009, 07:07 PM
 
4,535 posts, read 7,667,598 times
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The biggest problem northern cities are having is sustaining there current population. If you can't sustain and maintain a good quality of life for your current residents than how do expect to grow.

Cities like Dallas and Charlotte will continue to grow because its a much warmer climate, jobs, and overall quality of life is better.
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Old 07-30-2009, 07:18 PM
 
5,969 posts, read 8,190,219 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdogg817 View Post
The biggest problem northern cities are having is sustaining there current population.
You can not make a blanket statement like that, many Northern cities maintain stable populations and many are even growing. And many would argue that the major Northern cities provide a much better quality of life.
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Old 07-30-2009, 08:10 PM
 
4,535 posts, read 7,667,598 times
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Originally Posted by DailyJournalist View Post
You can not make a blanket statement like that, many Northern cities maintain stable populations and many are even growing. And many would argue that the major Northern cities provide a much better quality of life.

Oh I can back my statement up!!! Lets take your current place you reside in Collingswood, New Jersey. "Population on decline"
Historical populationsCensusPop.

193012,723
194012,685
195015,800
196017,370
197017,422
198015,838
199015,289
200014,326

Est. 2007 13,812




http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collingswood,_New_Jersey
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