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Old 08-16-2009, 05:49 PM
 
Location: Long Island
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That looks scary driving so close to that Light Rail, I know its a small train but I keep picturing a car/truck getting plowed locomotive style.
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Old 08-16-2009, 05:56 PM
 
Location: A Small Metro In Southeastern Virginia Called Virginia Beach/Norfolk.
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Haha that happens all the time in Houston. Like once a month lol.

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Old 08-16-2009, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cityboi757 View Post
Haha that happens all the time in Houston. Like once a month lol.

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lol. That's old. That was all the crahses in 2004 and 2005. Haven't had many of them ever since. But light rail wasn't the only problem there though. It was the stupid drivers in Houston.

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Trains that stop at traffic lights = fail. No two ways about that.
Basically. No different than a bus.
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Old 08-16-2009, 06:02 PM
 
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Agree. Light rail is very similar to bus rapid transit, which is very easy to build. Just assign a separate lane for bus on the existing highways will do. But because it is rail somehow people buy that it is a superior system. There are numerous discussions about that. People have given reasons such as beauty, comfortable issues etc. But in terms of efficiency, it is essentially bus rapid transit. Whenever density gets high, it travels slow. In low density areas it travels fast (like highway oriented areas).

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Originally Posted by Spade View Post

Basically. No different than a bus.
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Old 08-16-2009, 06:04 PM
 
Location: A Small Metro In Southeastern Virginia Called Virginia Beach/Norfolk.
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Would you rather ride BRT or LRT
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Old 08-16-2009, 06:05 PM
 
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I have no preference over these two. For me efficiency is the most important.

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Originally Posted by cityboi757 View Post
Would you rather ride BRT or LRT
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Old 08-16-2009, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Oak Park, IL
5,266 posts, read 8,313,320 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fashionguy View Post
Agree. Light rail is very similar to bus rapid transit, which is very easy to build. Just assign a separate lane for bus on the existing highways will do. But because it is rail somehow people buy that it is a superior system. There are numerous discussions about that. People have given reasons such as beauty, comfortable issues etc. But in terms of efficiency, it is essentially bus rapid transit. Whenever density gets high, it travels slow. In low density areas it travels fast (like highway oriented areas).
I'm not sure if its true, but one argument in favor of rail is that it stimulate much more development/investment than bus routes. The argument is that putting steel rails into the ground signals to investors that the transit route will be there long-term. This gives investors the confidence to put money into the area knowing they will reap the benefits of proximity to transit for decades to come.
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Old 08-16-2009, 06:10 PM
 
Location: A Small Metro In Southeastern Virginia Called Virginia Beach/Norfolk.
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That's true... They are basically the same, and bRT is much cheaper. But, light rail is probably better for the environment and it would kinda look dumb to have a dedicated lane for a bus. I'm sure people who didn't know would get in the way!
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Old 08-16-2009, 06:11 PM
 
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Yes I've seen that argument too. I tend to agree it is true so it might be a good thing for the city, but it doesn't change my willingness to ride it or not. On anther thought though, development that doesn't go along a potential rail will go somewhere else. The market size is more determinent in the volume of development in a city.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sukwoo View Post
I'm not sure if its true, but one argument in favor of rail is that it stimulate much more development/investment than bus routes. The argument is that putting steel rails into the ground signals to investors that the transit route will be there long-term. This gives investors the confidence to put money into the area knowing they will reap the benefits of proximity to transit for decades to come.
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Old 08-16-2009, 06:13 PM
 
9,199 posts, read 13,745,638 times
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Heavy rail. I take it every day and like that it can run on a schedule regardless of "traffic" and is completely separated from all other forms of transportation.

Although there are a few stations in Chicago that cross at street level on the northwest side, but I really never hear about any collisions. They have cross-bars that come down as the train zips by.
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