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Old 11-28-2009, 03:15 PM
 
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As someone that doesn't care for density, I don't see what the big deal is. I am just wondering what it is about density that some people like so much. If you like density, I'd like to hear from you to see what you have to say.
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Old 11-28-2009, 03:17 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,085 posts, read 31,502,030 times
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I am interested in the answers as well. I really don't get the whole draw and appeal of people packed in one spot either.
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Old 11-28-2009, 03:30 PM
 
Location: STL
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High density symbolizes a true urban feel that most people want. Generally, denser cities have more culture, amenities and diversity then less dense cities (New York, San Francisco, Chicago etc...). Although I prefer high density, any city over 15,000 people per sq. mile is too crowded in my opinion. 10,000 people per sq. mile is ideal.

Last edited by aaronstlcards; 11-28-2009 at 04:47 PM..
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Old 11-28-2009, 03:38 PM
 
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It's not a huge deal for me, but I think people should take into account the density of a city instead of just looking at the population. For instance, here in TN, the 2 biggest cities are Memphis and Nashville. Memphis has 669,651 people. Nashville has 596,462 people. Nashville's population is growing at a faster rate so I hear a lot of talk about how Nashville is going to surpass Memphis in population soon. But these people should take a look at the density of both cities:

Memphis has 2397 people per square mile (still pretty low for a city)
Nashville has 1260 people per square mile (very low for a "city")

So basically Nashville just has a lot of people spread out over a lot of area. Most of it feels more suburban (even rural) than urban. Density doesn't make a place better, but it can give you an idea of how urban a place is.
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Old 11-28-2009, 03:48 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in the universe
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I actually prefer density, but other than that I don't really care. As long as a live in a walkable community even if it is suburban. I do think that a city needs an urban core though.
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Old 11-28-2009, 09:43 PM
 
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Walkability is more important to me than density. However, a place needs to be relatively dense to support close-proximity of shopping, dining, entertainment, jobs, public transportation, and other things that make a community walkable.

Density doesn't necessarily have to do with "packing in the people." I have lived in places where buildings are 1-3 stories and streets are lined with mature vegetation, with most side streets being completely residential and with main streets being mixed commercial and residential. I have found these places to be just as walkable as Midtown Manhattan, which is probably 5-10 times as dense, depending on the block.

The appeal of living in a walkable - and therefore somewhat dense - neighborhood is that owning a car and driving everywhere is totally unnecessary. It's easy to get around on foot, by subway/bus/streetcar. No worrying about looking for parking near the office or choosing a designated driver for a night out at the bar. Also, many people in walkable areas do a lot more walking, get more exercise, and tend to stay more fit than people whose only walking is from the parking lot to the doors of Walmart or Costco. Furthermore, walkable areas don't feel lonely because you see plenty of people going about their days and tend to run into your neighbors more than you would if you lived in a low-density, non-walkable community. One of my biggest complaints about modern suburban sprawl is the feeling of loneliness it evokes. Not only might you not see a single person driving a few minutes through sprawl, you might not even see the front of a home either; many of these communities are built with wide vehicular thoroughfares lined with walls, only on the other side of which there are homes.

Sprawl: http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&so...,132.81,,0,5.9
http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sour...,269.97,,0,4.3
http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sour...,92.38,,0,8.71

Walkable communities that are not overwhelmingly dense:
http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sour...299.41,,0,0.79
http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sour...37.84,,0,-5.64
http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sour...,172.75,,0,3.8

Last edited by crisp444; 11-28-2009 at 10:11 PM..
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Old 11-28-2009, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Long Island/NYC
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I'm curious about the density-craze as well, my city is uber-dense overall and I don't see what's attractive about it (as a matter of fact I would hate to live somewhere dense, although its nice to visit once in a while), luckily I live in a fairly suburban part of the city.

When I walk around in Manhattan it feels awkward crossing the street with 100 people next to me, when its hot its disgusting (I love the heat itself) to have a ton of sweaty people in your face. I'm a NYC resident and native and I hate density (which is the epitome of an oxymoron lol).
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Old 11-28-2009, 10:27 PM
 
3,368 posts, read 9,883,806 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Infamous92 View Post
When I walk around in Manhattan it feels awkward crossing the street with 100 people next to me, when its hot its disgusting (I love the heat itself) to have a ton of sweaty people in your face. I'm a NYC resident and native and I hate density (which is the epitome of an oxymoron lol).
Places like Times Square are so overwhelmingly crowded with people that I think it would be unpleasant to live there. When you add the fact that the food around there is generally terrible and overpriced and that most of the stores are chains packed with tourists, you can understand why many New Yorkers prefer shopping Spring Street in SoHo, Lexington Avenue in the Upper East Side, and Court/Smith Streets in Cobble Hill/Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn. All of the places I have just named are very dense compared to the national density average, but far less dense, crowded, and noisey than the Times Square area.

See for comparison

Times Square: ny ny - Google Maps

Spring Street, SoHo: ny ny - Google Maps

Lexington Avenue, Upper East Side: ny ny - Google Maps

Court Street, Cobble Hill: court street cobble hill brooklyn ny - Google Maps
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Old 11-28-2009, 10:35 PM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
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I think cities should be dense in the downtown area to give those who want everything within walking distance, but to me I would rather have a house out in the country in a small town on a few acres all to myself.

I hate being crowded and I hate being around so many people, unless its at a sporting event or a concert then its ok. I hate driving on crowded streets.
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Old 11-28-2009, 10:39 PM
 
6,046 posts, read 9,179,251 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by desert sun View Post
I think cities should be dense in the downtown area to give those who want everything within walking distance, but to me I would rather have a house out in the country in a small town on a few acres all to myself.

I hate being crowded and I hate being around so many people, unless its at a sporting event or a concert then its ok. I hate driving on crowded streets.
You can say that again. I used to like big cities until I started driving.
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