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Old 12-10-2010, 04:10 PM
 
8,310 posts, read 6,730,003 times
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Most suburbs are incorporated cities, though some are called "villages" and I don't think there is any difference. There are some unincorporated neighborhoods that can be called suburbs. I think most of them have a center, in some cases a "downtown'" though that may be no more than a convenience store and pharmacy. Many try to zone out low income residents, but that is not always successful.
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Old 12-10-2010, 04:47 PM
 
192 posts, read 343,820 times
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Q: would you consider a suburb a town?

A: it depends.
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Old 04-18-2011, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Pismo Beach, CA
3,781 posts, read 6,110,638 times
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Well, I think what people consider a city and a town depends on the person.

I set the standard in California for incorporated communities under 200,000 population to be towns.

I think in some cases suburbs can be cities.

Now, I think I would only live in cities or towns that tend to be the wealthiest have the most variety of jobs.

Wealthier cities usually tend to have better shopping, nicer homes, and are just nicer.
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Old 04-18-2011, 06:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
Well, I think what people consider a city and a town depends on the person.

I set the standard in California for incorporated communities under 200,000 population to be towns.

I think in some cases suburbs can be cities.

Now, I think I would only live in cities or towns that tend to be the wealthiest have the most variety of jobs.

Wealthier cities usually tend to have better shopping, nicer homes, and are just nicer.
That's a pretty high standard, though undoubtedly several LA suburbs meet it. There might be three Chicago suburbs that populous; some are under 5,000.
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Old 04-18-2011, 07:46 PM
 
7,429 posts, read 8,131,279 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
Well, I think what people consider a city and a town depends on the person.

I set the standard in California for incorporated communities under 200,000 population to be towns.

I think in some cases suburbs can be cities.

Now, I think I would only live in cities or towns that tend to be the wealthiest have the most variety of jobs.

Wealthier cities usually tend to have better shopping, nicer homes, and are just nicer.
Um...no, you don't set the standard. Cities in California can be as small as a few hundred people.

Fact is...suburbs are also cities, just in a different form.

And the problem with wealthy cities is that if you aren't wealthy, it can be kind of tough to live there, and they're frickin' expensive.
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Old 04-19-2011, 12:44 AM
 
Location: Pismo Beach, CA
3,781 posts, read 6,110,638 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Um...no, you don't set the standard. Cities in California can be as small as a few hundred people.

Fact is...suburbs are also cities, just in a different form.

And the problem with wealthy cities is that if you aren't wealthy, it can be kind of tough to live there, and they're frickin' expensive.
Setting the standard is up to each and every person.
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Old 04-19-2011, 12:45 AM
 
Location: Pismo Beach, CA
3,781 posts, read 6,110,638 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
That's a pretty high standard, though undoubtedly several LA suburbs meet it. There might be three Chicago suburbs that populous; some are under 5,000.
Well, if I set my standard to 150,000 population then Santa Rosa and Salinas would fall into the city category and I consider them large towns.
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Old 04-19-2011, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
5,343 posts, read 6,005,288 times
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Suburbs are generally dependent on a Larger entity for their general survival.

Orange County may have been a suburb of LA back in the day, but now most Orange County Cities have populations of over 200K (even beach towns like Huntington Beach) and can survive in their own orbit without being satellites to LA
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Old 04-19-2011, 01:52 PM
 
7,429 posts, read 8,131,279 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DinsdalePirahna View Post
Suburbs are generally dependent on a Larger entity for their general survival.

Orange County may have been a suburb of LA back in the day, but now most Orange County Cities have populations of over 200K (even beach towns like Huntington Beach) and can survive in their own orbit without being satellites to LA
Can they? It seems like Orange County and other suburban counties (even ones with high-population areas) still depend economically on the urban core area, if not for jobs and shopping than for other purposes (in the case of LA/Orange, a place to dump Orange County's homeless.)
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Old 04-19-2011, 02:02 PM
 
41,732 posts, read 45,131,325 times
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In amny areas they are becomeing the market palces of the cities they support now. In amny areas sities are more reliant on federal grqants for any development than actaully existing on their own.They are like a sink hole mostly just consumin gmoney with no contribtion really.I if they think they can develop they are likely to get their chnace in comig years as grants runout .
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