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Old 04-19-2011, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
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To people from some parts of the country the question of the thread sounds silly. In a lot places suburbs are legally towns, so how would one consider a suburb not a town?

I suppose the OP meant can a suburb feel like a small town; a place with a center and community-feel without feeling as large and bustling as a city and part of a larger metro area.

My answer would be it depends. Some suburbs can be tight knit and rather insular. Some suburbs have centers and can feel a bit like towns. In a lot of metro areas suburban development engulfed older towns with a center leading to areas with an old town centers and lower density sprawl in between. Though, sometimes the town centers have become a center for more novelty items with the real activity in the newer sprawl development.
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Old 04-19-2011, 03:40 PM
 
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
639 posts, read 514,714 times
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It depends on every suburb itself. São Paulo has too many suburbs economically independent(banks, hospital, police station, markets, even Shopping mall)but they're still conected to Metropolis. In my opinion, if a suburb can survive alone, that is, its people don't need to go far beyond in order to look for some stuff or service, and, there are defined boundaries from Town(like a river, a highway, forest), then you can consider it a municipality.
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Old 04-19-2011, 04:36 PM
 
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
5,358 posts, read 6,281,846 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Can they? It seems like Orange County and other suburban counties (even ones with high-population areas) still depend economically on the urban core area, if not for jobs and shopping than for other purposes (in the case of LA/Orange, a place to dump Orange County's homeless.)
I don't think anyone in Orange County relies on LA for anything. The Multifaceted Job market is improving. There are very good restaurants around here. Good Colleges. We have tons of entertainment and recreational revenues. (We could use some better museums). We even have our own Hockey, Baseball and possibly Basketball teams.

Exporting the Homeless is another story. Many have been known to get one-way tickets to very remote places.
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Old 04-19-2011, 09:22 PM
 
7,600 posts, read 8,508,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DinsdalePirahna View Post
I don't think anyone in Orange County relies on LA for anything. The Multifaceted Job market is improving. There are very good restaurants around here. Good Colleges. We have tons of entertainment and recreational revenues. (We could use some better museums). We even have our own Hockey, Baseball and possibly Basketball teams.

Exporting the Homeless is another story. Many have been known to get one-way tickets to very remote places.
But most of them end up in the warehouse district in Los Angeles. Economic dependence doesn't really have much to do with entertainment, recreation or sports teams. And generally the things a suburban region expects an urban region/old city core to do are things that the suburban region believes should not exist, at least not in their backyard.
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Old 04-19-2011, 11:00 PM
Status: "Snow is coming for Christmas!" (set 1 hour ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
70,068 posts, read 60,674,394 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
But most of them end up in the warehouse district in Los Angeles. Economic dependence doesn't really have much to do with entertainment, recreation or sports teams. And generally the things a suburban region expects an urban region/old city core to do are things that the suburban region believes should not exist, at least not in their backyard.
Oh? Such as?
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Old 04-20-2011, 12:31 AM
 
10,151 posts, read 14,937,193 times
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I think he's referring, in this case, to the export of homeless released hospital patients from Orange County into LA's Skid Row; many local hospitals, including those as far away as Costa Mesa (a long drive from downtown LA), essentially "dumped" homeless patients out onto the streets of Skid Row.

I don't think it's fair to say "suburban regions" do that, though, as these days even suburban counties are facing up to the fact that they need to provide more services for their own problems. On the other hand, core cities still often take on a disproportionate share of providing services for those coming in from the suburbs, and while things are changing, it still takes time and money to play catch up. There have been many examples from different parts of the country -- the idea was that the core city had the resources to deal with the problems (more missions, homeless shelters, medical centers, whatever), etc.. Here in Minneapolis, there was a big controversy recently regarding Hennepin County Medical Center restricting some services (within legal limits) to poor or uninsured patients from outside the county.

Where I think the problem gets more pronounced is at the individual suburb level. There are definitely some parasitic suburbs around here that prefer to keep certain things outside of their boundaries. There was a big flap last year when a very small eating disorder clinic wanted to open up in one small, wealthy suburb. Residents of places like that want to have access to such clinics when they need them, but they don't want to allow them in their own backyard. With some of these smaller suburbs they have such tight zoning restrictions that they've been able to get away with a lot of things that the city core could not do. I don't think it's fair to generalize all suburbs like that, however, but I do think that the suburbs of most cities as a whole do need to step up and do their part to meet their community's needs. Some places are doing that more successfully than others.
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Old 04-20-2011, 12:57 AM
Status: "get me out of the central coast!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Pismo Beach, CA
3,892 posts, read 6,403,584 times
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Well, I guess since individuals can't determine what is considered a city or not then I would say any place with the name "City of...." is a city and any place with a name of "Town of...." is a town.

Regardless, it doesn't matter which I live in. I look for a community that has several nice amenities such as Macy's, nice car dealerships, a bunch of big box retailers, a public gathering place, old homes, good schools, movie theater, bowling alley, and theaters or performing arts center for plays.

I think California does not have suburbs anymore. All the suburbs have become independent and California no longer has any place with the name Town, and if there are some there are probably scarce.

If anything can be called suburbs in California it would be communities within larger cities like many communities in the San Fernando Valley. All though, hard to say if you would consider them suburbs or boroughs. I'd say suburbs.
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Old 04-20-2011, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
28,621 posts, read 14,847,483 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
think California does not have suburbs anymore. All the suburbs have become independent and California no longer has any place with the name Town, and if there are some there are probably scarce.
But in Massachusetts most suburbs are with the name Town, but towns are almost as independent as cities. That doesn't mean Massachusetts doesn't have suburbs.

Why must a place not have an independent government to be considered a suburb?

Whether suburbs are called towns or cities tells us little about the place and the legal definitions of a city or town vary widely in different states.
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Old 04-20-2011, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
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The only thing that OC relies on LA for is access to its ports. Other than that OC can and does pretty damn well on its own.

The recreational, entertainment and sports amenities are just added bonuses. And yes OC still has a homeless problem. It happens in beach communities.
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Old 08-20-2012, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Hartford, Vermont
233 posts, read 141,670 times
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An important aspect of Boston and its suburbs is that there is no unincorporated land in Bostons metro or CSA and all the towns and cities started out as independent cities and towns and then grew together and some started to function as a suburb to Boston as such they all have a downtown but for some of the towns and cities the downtown might be nearly empty. Also in New England a town and a city are differentiated by the type of government. It is explained in this wikipedia article: New England town - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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