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Old 06-14-2013, 11:51 AM
 
Location: SLC, UT
1,571 posts, read 2,275,816 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kletter1mann View Post
This answers a question I've been wondering about as well. Can you elaborate? I understand that along the front there's no total escape. 5000 ft seems to be about the upper limit of construction on the east bench. When you're up around 5000 ft is it fair to say that the cumulative time you're subjected to the inversions is significantly less than, say, at 4100 ft in valley? 5000 ft seems to be about the upper limit of construction on the east bench.

I'd also assume that the subjective inversion "intensity" is less than lower down too. Since you're higher up there's obviously less haze between you and the clear upper air above the haze and so things are appreciably brighter than the valley floor, even when it's at its worst. True? Or is this splitting hairs?
I live at 5000, and I didn't see much of a difference between the inversion where I live and what it was like downtown (where I work). If you have any type of health problems affected by air quality (any lung problems, etc.), living at 4500 feet or 5000 feet probably won't make a difference.

I heard Park City was above the inversion. Park City is at about 7,000 feet. So at some point between 5000 and 7000 feet, the inversion ends. But as you said, anything on the east bench is about 5000 or below.
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Old 06-14-2013, 12:24 PM
 
Location: East Millcreek
2,397 posts, read 5,220,807 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MisfitBanana View Post
I live at 5000, and I didn't see much of a difference between the inversion where I live and what it was like downtown (where I work). If you have any type of health problems affected by air quality (any lung problems, etc.), living at 4500 feet or 5000 feet probably won't make a difference.

I heard Park City was above the inversion. Park City is at about 7,000 feet. So at some point between 5000 and 7000 feet, the inversion ends. But as you said, anything on the east bench is about 5000 or below.
Thanks, I appreciate an answer that's an answer. Fortunately I suffer from no health problems (knock wood).

FWIW, I was skiing in out here last Jan and experienced that infamous inversion daily. It was very clear when you drive down into it from LCC and I could smell it - a distinct odor somewhat like diesel fuel. something. My recollection is that the peculiar odor actually reduced at lower elevation, but maybe that's because after a few minutes you just don't smell it anymore. Regardless, the visibility seems to be better up where the road to LCC comes out of the canyon than right downtown.
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Old 06-12-2016, 12:37 PM
 
1 posts, read 1,395 times
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Hello there my Salt Lake and other interested folks. I wanted to supply some new information to help end the debate of whether elevation in the valley effects air quality, and to what extent. The University of Utah's meteorology department has, after 2 years of laser ceilometer measurements, been able to measure exactly this.

The summary is that at 400m and higher above the valley floor there is clean, cycling air the vast majority of the time; Even in the worst inversion events in the last 2 years. There is virtually no PM2.5 up there for roughly 90% of inversion events, and the aerosol level stays in higher concentration towards the bottom of the valley floor except for very rare events. As the Jordan River is at about 4210 feet, 400 m above is at 5424.

Someone much smarter than I is probably working out the details of the frequencies as I write this, but there is some correspondence to the higher you are, the less time you spend in, and the less polluted air you breathe, but to what extent below 400m is more difficult to determine.

Here is the information site they have posted in a fact friendly FAQ format:

[url=http://home.chpc.utah.edu/~whiteman/PM2.5/PM2.5.html]PM2.5 in Salt Lake Valley[/url]

To learn how to read ceilometer charts go here:

[url=http://home.chpc.utah.edu/~whiteman/PM2.5/ceilometer_guide.html]PM2.5 in Salt Lake Valley[/url]

Finally, to see the charts for the official measurement station, Hawthorne Elementary, here:

[url=http://www.inscc.utah.edu/~hoch/DAQSTUD/quicklooks/ceil_hwt/]Index of /~hoch/DAQSTUD/quicklooks/ceil_hwt[/url]

See ya in the hills,

Cheers!
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Old 06-16-2016, 08:45 AM
 
207 posts, read 153,864 times
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I lived in Copperton for 13 years and we were mostly above the inversion at 5500 feet. I worked by the airport and I would drive into a massive fog bank as I dropped down into Magna at 5400 South & 8400 West and my car thermometer's temperature would drop. When I got back home, there would be clear skies and warm.

If you think about the valley like a bowl, the canyons would be like cracks in the rim of the bowl. Around 5000 feet, you start getting up into some of the canyons. If there is enough upper air movement, the inversion doesn't build up much past that. If there isn't a lot of upper air movement, the inversion can build up to the top of the bowl, around 7200 feet.

If you want to live above the inversion and be in SLCo, you have to be on the far west side (west of Highway 111 and south of 5400 South), Rose Canyon in Herriman, way up the east canyons (such as Alta or upper Emigration), or on top of the Traverse (South Mountain area). But most of these places still get impacted by the inversion occasionally.
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Old 06-29-2016, 12:38 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in the Southwest...
336 posts, read 382,340 times
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Well, that finishes it for me...

Thanks for the great info folks!

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Old 03-28-2017, 08:51 PM
 
4 posts, read 4,133 times
Reputation: 10
Default Yup it is two entirely separate issues!

Yup it is two entirely separate issues ...just because everyone else is drowning I am looking desperately for something to stay afloat on does NOT mean I do not have a heart to save others ALSO ....it is just survival instinct looking for the safest place to exist! No sin in that alone! ...this person simply PRESUMED evil about anyone asking the question "how high do I need to be to escape??" Which is also MY question! We are at only 2700' and at least I can not "feel" the pain of smog when I inhale ...I was raised in the san fernando valley suburbs of Los Angeles where the smog was so thick...SO THICK! It literally HURT to take a deep breath growing up there! We would party up in the foothills any you could plainly see the crap laying in the valley floor like a thick UGLY orange/brown blanket! Nowadays I live in north san diego county where at least I can breathe without physical pain! Some days (like today) I can see what reminds me of the LA smog in the valley I grew up in ...today is appears pinned between the coast and the mountains where I am half way up ...at least it APPEARS below us?!? Which is why I was looking up answer to the question of how high the smog layer extends to (if it has somewhere lower to go)...I sure as HELL do not wish it on ANYONE ...but excuse me if WE would like to exist ABOVE it IF possible!
...will not help anyone if I choke along with them! ...Ya know?
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Old 03-28-2017, 09:00 PM
 
4 posts, read 4,133 times
Reputation: 10
Default BTW editor....

I think you are also sort of doing the same thing in a different sort of way? Presuming that people that like pick up trucks and guns are also against the common good ...problem here is that by nature we all just want to ASSUME that "I KNOW the hearts of people what they are interested in" ...which let's be honest is unfair...
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Old 03-28-2017, 09:08 PM
 
4 posts, read 4,133 times
Reputation: 10
Might the height of the layer of smog dramatically depend on the altitude of it's FLOOR? In other words say a valley FLOOR is sea level and smog is laying in said valley...THEN how high up does one need be to be above most of it? Or is does it have more to do with air pressure no matter where the floor is??? I do not understand but I want to! At only 2700' altitude looking all way down and able to physically SEE the pacific ocean, what appears to be smog SEEMS to or appears to exist as a thick layer "down there" .... or is that just wishful thinking??
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Old 04-05-2017, 12:14 PM
 
207 posts, read 153,864 times
Reputation: 343
The height of the smog layer depends upon the distance to a wind speed that is able to disperse it.
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Old 04-12-2017, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Metro Detroit
1,770 posts, read 1,751,715 times
Reputation: 3468
In a typical inversion the higher elevations (until just shy of the tops of the mountain ranges) experience similar or only very slightly lower concentrations of hazardous particulates in the air. The idea that higher elevations are associated with less air pollution is based on when the inversion is clearing. During this time, the higher elevations will clear sooner, sometimes up to a couple days sooner. During these days you may see clear skies at 5,500 feet, but an inversion still at 4,500 feet; however, during the height of the inversion all elevations are impacted, with stations at the base of the east benches often reporting the highest concentrations of particulates. There is no "cap" elevation where you can expect to not be impacted by a winter inversion.
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