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Old 03-08-2018, 07:09 PM
 
Location: California
24 posts, read 9,931 times
Reputation: 15

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SWFL_Native View Post
At the end of the day proper tires are way way way more important than drive-train of a vehicle. Even more important than tires are proper driving techniques for the ice and snow.

If this Floridian can learn how to properly drive in the winter in 1 season so can a Californian.
Actually, it may be a bit more difficult for me since I've rarely driven around CA myself. I mainly use public transit since work and school are nearby. But thanks for the tip! I'll definitely look into tips for driving in snowier conditions.
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Old 03-08-2018, 07:12 PM
 
Location: California
24 posts, read 9,931 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katzpur View Post
The area right west of the "U" is excellent. And there are a number of rentals near Foothill Boulevard, which is also close to the "U" and a nice, safe neighborhood. Actually, if you wanted to take Trax (our lightrail system) to school, which many students do since it goes all the way from downtown to the University Medical Center, stopping multiple places on campus, you could live anywhere between downtown and the university if you picked someplace between say, 1st South and 6th South.

I'm curious as to what you're going to be studying. It's a graduated degree you're going for, right?
I prefer to live by Trax, but at the same time, I would also like to have a car with me since I'll be doing residencies the following year. Do you know of any resources to find housing specifically for students?

I'm in a healthcare degree.
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Old 03-08-2018, 07:14 PM
 
Location: California
24 posts, read 9,931 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kavm View Post
There is a lot of student-oriented housing near the U. You'd be better advised to stay close by. Close to TRAX Red Line stations is an alternative, but I'd not stray too far - as you are coming here to study at the U and not spend time riding TRAX.

Also, I'd suggest you stop taking heating advice from someone who has only heard of electric heat. Do not consider housing without heat - should that be an option.
Student Housing by the U is overpriced. Many students suggested it's better if I found an apartment myself so that's what I'm trying to do. Do you know of any good housing resources?
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Old 03-08-2018, 07:17 PM
 
Location: California
24 posts, read 9,931 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Subaru AWD system is far superior to anything that Honda offers. You can view online comparison test videos that have each brand test on a terrain course using the same conditions and parameters.
I'm quite unfamiliar with anything that is car-related so... do you think it'd be wise for me to buy a slightly used car from Utah or CA? A previous post suggested I buy a used car from CA because many UT cars could have excessive deterioration because of the salted roads. Also, if I bought a used car from Utah, wouldn't it be okay as long as I bought one from a car dealer such as Subaru etc.?
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Old 03-08-2018, 07:20 PM
 
Location: California
24 posts, read 9,931 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthernBelleInUtah View Post
A good winter coat, such as sold by Eddie Bauer. None of that fashion stuff that won't stop a wind. A good pair of waterproof boots, also Eddie Bauer or Duluth Trading Company or ?? Not fashion boots with no gripping sole. I liked Polartec 300 shirts and sweaters for warmth. Depends on if your house/apt is well-insulated or not. A car with 4-wheel drive to be really safe. Polartec 300 gloves, not leather driving ones.
Do you think snow boots are really necessary? Couldn't I get by with regular boots, as long as I apply waterproofing spray on it? Sorry in advance for my newb questions
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Old 03-08-2018, 07:29 PM
 
Location: IN
20,789 posts, read 35,837,873 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaleDaisies View Post
I'm quite unfamiliar with anything that is car-related so... do you think it'd be wise for me to buy a slightly used car from Utah or CA? A previous post suggested I buy a used car from CA because many UT cars could have excessive deterioration because of the salted roads. Also, if I bought a used car from Utah, wouldn't it be okay as long as I bought one from a car dealer such as Subaru etc.?
A CA used car will always carry a premium price due to condition, usually not contending with road salt. However, you can find many certified used vehicles with warranties still attached to them in UT as well. Modern vehicles have much better rust proofing compared to those in decades past. With that being said, a certified used Subaru with good winter tires will get you through snowy winters with ease in the Rocky Mountains. Of course, use good judgement and don't travel during blizzards. I have an older Subaru that is high mileage and needs a new rear differential. Reliability is good, but some parts can get a bit pricey as some items wear out after high mileage.
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Old 03-08-2018, 07:49 PM
 
Location: California
24 posts, read 9,931 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
A CA used car will always carry a premium price due to condition, usually not contending with road salt. However, you can find many certified used vehicles with warranties still attached to them in UT as well. Modern vehicles have much better rust proofing compared to those in decades past. With that being said, a certified used Subaru with good winter tires will get you through snowy winters with ease in the Rocky Mountains. Of course, use good judgement and don't travel during blizzards. I have an older Subaru that is high mileage and needs a new rear differential. Reliability is good, but some parts can get a bit pricey as some items wear out after high mileage.
I heard pricey replacement parts depends on the brand. My parents told me Toyota or Honda have affordable replacement parts. What are your thoughts on those brands for the snow?
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Old 03-08-2018, 08:45 PM
 
Location: SLC
465 posts, read 421,802 times
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I am afraid I do not have specific suggestions as to how to go about finding off-campus housing that is convenient to access the University campus. My wife is a professor there and we are conveniently located with respect to the campus but it is not a student housing area. A lot of students do, of course, do precisely that - and I am sure there must be student resources at the U that can provide you helpful pointers. Those resources are likely to be slightly better informed and useful than this forum. You can either live in the immediate vicinity and walk to campus or live close to red-line trax in the direction of downtown.

As for the garments, boots, etc. - you might want to first relocate here and then acquire these things. A lot depends on what kind of activities you are involved in - during the working/studying week (e.g. how you commute to the campus) and what kind of winter sports you participate in. If you are mostly indoors - you can get away with a lot less. Alternately, it would be quite uncomfortable if you are trying to save money on shoes if you walk half hour each way to campus daily.

On cars, the brand is often the least reliable indicator of whether the car is going to be good on snow or not. It depends on a number of factors - what kind of roads are you driving (steep, flat), 4WD or AWD will be more useful if you are going to go up/down a lot of steep hills, or go to canyons for skiing. But, the drive (4WD, AWD, 2WD) only affects the carís ability to go forward (or not). Itís stopping ability depends on breaks (ABS preferred unless you are an expert driver) and the tires you run (the softness of the tire rubber compound, its thread and most importantly, its narrowness). Not many people here run snow tires and they definitely arenít necessary but they can make a huge difference if you are going to be out with more often. Then, there are other factors - e.g. how heavy the vehicle is (heavier if often better - for the purpose of snow performance), how high its road clearance is, even how how well or poorly balanced the vehicle is. And, most important factor of all - how good the driver behind the wheel is. So, there are no universal answers. But, if you were buying a car for Utah - Iíd advise an AWD for sure, irrespective of the brand of choice.

Last edited by kavm; 03-08-2018 at 09:02 PM..
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Old 03-08-2018, 09:01 PM
 
Location: California
24 posts, read 9,931 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by kavm View Post
I am afraid I do not have specific suggestions as to how to go about finding off-campus housing that is convenient to access the University campus. My wife is a professor there and we are conveniently located with respect to the campus but it is not a student housing area. A lot of students do, of course, do precisely that - and I am sure there must be student resources at the U that can provide you helpful pointers. Those resources are likely to be slightly better informed and useful than this forum. You can either live in the immediate vicinity and walk to campus or live close to red-line trax in the direction of downtown.

As for the garments, boots, etc. - you might want to first relocate here and then acquire these things. A lot depends on what kind of activities you are involved in - during the working/studying week (e.g. how you commute to the campus) and what kind of winter sports you participate in. If you are mostly indoors - you can get away with a lot less. Alternately, it would be quite uncomfortable if you are trying to save money on shoes if you walk half hour each way to campus daily.

On cars, the brand is often the least reliable indicator of whether the car is going to be good on snow or not. It depends on a number of factors - what kind of roads are you driving (steep, flat), 4WD or AWD will be more useful if you are going to go up/down a lot of steep hills, or go to canyons for skiing. But, the drive (4WD, AWD, 2WD) only affects the carís ability to go forward (or not). Itís stopping ability depends on breaks (ABS preferred unless you are an expert driver) and the tires you run. Not many people here run snow tires and they definitely arenít necessary but they can make a huge difference if you are going to be out with more often. Then, there are other factors - e.g. how heavy the vehicle is (heavier if often better - for the purpose of snow performance), how high its road clearance is, even how how well or poorly balanced the vehicle is. And, most important factor of all - how good the driver behind the wheel is. So, there are no universal answers. But, if you were buying a car for Utah - Iíd advise an AWD for sure, irrespective of the brand of choice.
Yea, the U should have better resources as soon as they finish accepting my class, but I was hoping to get a head start.

I'm more than likely not going to participate in winter sports when I'm here, but if I do, it will be rare. In most cases, I'll probably use the car to commute to campus, home, restaurants, and markets. If that's the case, I suppose I don't need to invest in snow tires since most establishments would close down if there was a snow storm, right?

And as for cars specifically: I'll likely pick the most affordable brand first, and then from there, I'll look into their selection of AWDs. It's only a starter car after all. I don't really care how it looks. As long as its safe, affordable, and gets me from A to B, I'll be happy.
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Old 03-08-2018, 09:05 PM
 
Location: IN
20,789 posts, read 35,837,873 times
Reputation: 13218
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaleDaisies View Post
I heard pricey replacement parts depends on the brand. My parents told me Toyota or Honda have affordable replacement parts. What are your thoughts on those brands for the snow?
Toyota or Honda might be a bit less than Subaru, but not by much. I haven't had a Toyota in years, so can't speculate. Honda performs the worst in the snow, I would rate the Honda CRV a below average grade across the board for snow driving- while I would give a Subaru Forester an above average grade across the board. If you can find an older Toyota RAV4 V6 4WD, that is a good bet for winter driving and performance value.
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