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Old 04-24-2015, 10:59 AM
 
25 posts, read 27,155 times
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Choices are:
1. Clark College for GE classes (2yrs) then transfer out to Portland State, Univ. of Washington or other Universities
2. Go to Portland State directly (They sound really good) but I'm gonna have a huge loan/investment
3. She's been accepted to a few Cal State Universities as well (though we will be residing in PNW soon)

Considering everything under the sun, quality of education, cost as I will have to pay out of state tuition for at least the first year if at Univ. , Crime at both areas Clark College & PSU downtown etc. I have heard, read about all the crime rates (assaults, sex assualt, burglary etc.)

*Minimal costs going to JC and transfer out to univ. vs. just paying up once she is in her Jr. & Sr. years at a University.

Is Portland State worth it? Is it relatively safe?
Is Clark College worth the time to do her GE (save some$$$) and is the crime rate in Vancouver area as big as what I am lead to believe? I hear negative stories about the administration, getting the classes you need to stay on track. Ideally, you only want bust the 90 units out in 2 yrs. How realistic is it?

Thanks for your thoughts folks!
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Old 04-24-2015, 12:02 PM
 
Location: CA, OR & WA (Best Coast)
370 posts, read 265,543 times
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Clark College's website states boarder towns are considered resident, not sure what Portland State is.

The most important question is what field of study is she in, and does Portland State support that field? If so, then being so close it would make sense to go there.

Clark is $108/unit for residents x 90 units your looking at $9,720
Portland U for residents is $262/unit x 90 units or $23,580
Portland U non-residents is $607/unit x 90 units or $54,630

So you can see you could save some serious money, also PU website says 3.0 gpa min. I don't see anything wrong with going to a jc before moving up to PU. The risk of placing directly into PU is if she (god forbid) drops out?

Employers are looking for graduates of their specific line of work that means if your daughter wants to be a pharmacist, she should be looking at schools like UOP, or if she wants to be a doctor, Davis or Stanford.

I did the jc thing and moved on to a four year and all my student debt is paid off. I have friends who when straight to a four year and are still paying down debt. I also have friends who are doctors, who will be paying for their entire life LOL
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Old 04-24-2015, 12:36 PM
 
25 posts, read 27,155 times
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I hear you cyberous. JC is the logical thing to do. My only questions with Clark are difficulty of getting the classes she needs to bang out the GE in 2 years and safety otherwise, it makes the most sense.

She got into the PSU College of Eng (Computer Science). If she went to JC Clark does have a DTA track to PSU and other places. DTA = Direct Transfer Agreement. She's pretty set on Comp Sci at this point.

Yes, the student loans/parent plus direct loans are going to be huge.

Where did you go to JC, how was that experience getting your classes etc?
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Old 04-24-2015, 12:39 PM
 
4,060 posts, read 4,461,251 times
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If you're a WA resident PSU would likely involve non-resident tuition for the entire program length.

Establishing OR residency for tuition purposes involves more than just waiting a year - she would have to be a resident of OR for that length of time for reasons other than obtaining an education, and being enrolled tends to prevent meeting that criteria. I'm not aware of any PSU residency exemption for Vanc residents, though you could ask or look it up on their website.

I agree with cyberous, though, that there's really not enough here to say what she "should" do amongst the vast array of colleges out there, only that what you've provided suggests PSU is likely not going to be her most affordable option.
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Old 04-24-2015, 01:42 PM
 
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So there is a border county policy for PSU but you have to only go part time.

http://www.pdx.edu/registration/site...der_Policy.pdf
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Old 04-24-2015, 02:19 PM
 
Location: CA, OR & WA (Best Coast)
370 posts, read 265,543 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Endinmind View Post
I hear you cyberous. JC is the logical thing to do. My only questions with Clark are difficulty of getting the classes she needs to bang out the GE in 2 years and safety otherwise, it makes the most sense.

She got into the PSU College of Eng (Computer Science). If she went to JC Clark does have a DTA track to PSU and other places. DTA = Direct Transfer Agreement. She's pretty set on Comp Sci at this point.

Yes, the student loans/parent plus direct loans are going to be huge.

Where did you go to JC, how was that experience getting your classes etc?

I actually move quite a bit. I when to a jc in central California/San Jose and graduated from Depaul in Chicago. My experience was positive. I had professors that taught at both the jc and San Jose State. The quality of education really comes from the teachers and not the school. However, some schools pay better or are more prestigious so they get higher quality teachers.

I have personally never heard of an employer asking "how did you get your lower division credits" lol

Just make sure she does not take any credits that can not be transferred (trust me I know, so many extra credits/wasted time )

Edit: As for difficulty of getting classes, that will only happen the first semester, or possibly year. Once she has established that she is a permanent student she will get priority over new students. Most classes will allow more students to sign up for classes than what they can actually accommodate with the expectation that a good majority will drop out.

My suggestion is to sign up for the required classes but possibly the ones that have room or are less desirable until she get's priority status.

Last edited by cyberous; 04-24-2015 at 02:29 PM..
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Old 04-24-2015, 08:25 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,545 posts, read 39,924,861 times
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I would do Clark, then head to CA. (get a residence status one yr before transfer (clark will not inquire of your status once you are enrolled)

Of course... do Clark when it is FREE (Running Start)

She has a lot of schooling ahead, Clark has some pretty good 'basic training' and high quality core classes. CA has lots of schools / options to offer and usually MUCH cheaper than PSU.
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Old 04-27-2015, 07:54 AM
 
8 posts, read 5,828 times
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No one here seems to be considering what the young woman wants to do when she grows up and which school offers her the best education for that goal. Yes, for the short term, a CC is probably a good idea financially, as is a close-to-home university. But the quality of education is more important in the long run, as is learning to be an independent adult.

My $.02...
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Old 04-27-2015, 12:21 PM
 
4,060 posts, read 4,461,251 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stickball View Post
No one here seems to be considering what the young woman wants to do when she grows up and which school offers her the best education for that goal. Yes, for the short term, a CC is probably a good idea financially, as is a close-to-home university. But the quality of education is more important in the long run, as is learning to be an independent adult.

Several of us considered it and asked for more detail; there just wasn't enough info from the OP to say anything meaningful about it.

What sector much less which school is reliant on a lot of missing details, like program of study and career goals. And in some cases a non-profit 4 year might be a better option depending on eligibility for need- or merit-based support from the institution.
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Old 04-27-2015, 12:32 PM
 
Location: WA
2,911 posts, read 3,994,294 times
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I teach HS science (mostly seniors) and am in a position to counsel a lot of kids and also interact with a lot of colleges and universities. My oldest daughter is also a HS junior so we are doing the college visits and college planning thing. Here is what I tell students when asked these questions.

First, people go to college for basically 3 reasons: To earn a "pedigree", to earn a "credential" or to gain an "education". What kind of career you have in mind will determine what reason you are going to college.

Some professions require a pedigree in which case where you go to school is extremely important. If you want to go into investment banking on Wall Street or get a partnership track job with a major law firm or land a liberal arts tenure track teaching job at a top university then where you go to school is extremely important. Goldman-Sachs or some White Shoe law firm are unlikely to even look at your resume unless you attended HYPS (Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Stanford). Even in less elite situations many jobs are more about the pedigree than degree. Often it is the case that the sorority sister you peeled off the pavement one night has a dad who is president of some bank and that's how you land your first job. Unfair? Perhaps but that's how things often work in the business world. If you are going to school for the pedigree then you had best apply to and attend the school you want from the start because you will be completely outside of the school culture when you arrive as a junior. Most everyone makes most of their college friends their freshman year when you are forced to and it is really tough to break in as a junior transfer. I know, I was one. Plus, all the professors you will be needing almost immediately for recommendations for internships and grad school will not know who you are.

Some professions simply require credentials. For example, nursing, teaching, most of the allied health professions. If you are applying for a nursing job or pharmacy tech job or teaching job the important thing is that you have the proper credentials and licenses for the job. Where you spend your freshman and sophomore years are almost completely irrelevant. If your career path is one in which the main objective of college is obtaining professional credentials such as license or certification then starting at a community college and transferring is a perfectly valid approach.

Finally, a minority of students actually attend college for the education. Yes, it is a minority. These are the students who go places like Reed College to study the classics or go to Julliard to study music. They would be ill-served by messing around in a community college when they should be pursuing their particular passion in the best environment they can find. Most of these students will be poor unless they are so brilliant they can rise to the absolute top of their chosen pursuit.

I generally advise students to do what they can to start at the school where they want to finish. Community colleges have a very low graduation rate. The great majority of students who start at community colleges with the idea of continuing on at a 4 year school end up dropping out. In some states, less than 15% of community college students go on to earn 4 year degrees. A lot of them get there because poor grades or habits keep them from getting into their 4 year school of choice but end up finding out that they didn't like school the first time around and they still don't like it and end up drifting off to the job in the mall or restaurant instead of finishing. And don't kid yourself, a class like Bio 101 or Chem 101 at Clark Community College is going to be nothing like the same class at Reed or Berkely or Stanford or UW. One will be a class with a bunch of English Language learners, high school dropouts or near dropouts, older adults going back to school, and the occasional bright student and taught by an adjust professor working for near minimum wage and probably driving around to a couple of different schools to create a full teaching load. The other will be a class among the best and brightest and most driven students taught in the best facilities with the best professors and graduate assistants. Students who start at community colleges and then transfer to more rigorous 4-year schools often find themselves in way over their heads and find that their first 2 years of community college prerequisites did not really prepare them at all for upper level work at a competitive university. That's just a fact.

That said, some students can and do make it work. But it can be a tough road. For example, I had one student a few years ago who was absolutely brilliant. She should have been going to Stanford or Rice or some place like that but she stayed in town to attend the local community college because she was the daughter of Mexican immigrants and one parent was in prison and the other had been deported so she was the primary caregiver and guardian for her younger siblings and was forced to stay and work full time while attending community college. She ended up transferring to Texas A&M and getting a dental degree and is now successfully completing a dental surgical residency. But she is the exception.
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