U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Washington > Vancouver area
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-12-2018, 09:26 PM
 
903 posts, read 1,059,978 times
Reputation: 2042

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by sheilafromtheoc View Post
My question for anyone: how much does it really rain in Vancouver? I am not too familiar with the weather. Are most days generally overcast and grey? How much sunshine do you really get?
Winter (November to early February), it will definitely be raining and overcast a fair bit. It's a mild rain, sometimes even misting, but it's frequent enough. Big downpours are rare, and thunderstorms rarer still. Snow, also rare, but it may happen once or twice a year, or, not at all. The trend up here is warming, less snow, and I imagine within a couple generations, no snow. Spring summer and fall are pretty spectacular, but spring also has rain, and fall will have the clouds starting to roll in on the regular. Views, vistas, plants and wildlife are pretty spectacular, arguably among the best in the United States. Just today we saw big bucks in a developed neighboorhood, some eagles soaring overhead (they've made a huge comeback in Washington), hawks on the prowl, big garden-type snakes in the grasses during our hike, etc. etc. There's just tons of wildlife all over, doing stuff. The extensive plant life, rains and water sources, and abundant food for grazers and predators alike means wildlife does very, very well up here.

If sunshine is really important to you, or if you hate grey, overcast days, move to Arizona. In the PNW, up here it's all about the green, the water, and the outdoor activities (hiking, biking, mountaineering, volcanoes, rock climbing, fishing). No joke, even in the middle of winter people are out and active. Ski season, forget about it, the traffic jams to and from the most popular slopes are legion. If active outdoor "stuff" isn't your thing, again, I'd suggest moving elsewhere. Arizona has hiking and biking, some rock climbing, but there's also a lot of shopping, and spending money on expensive cars.


Also, Arizona real estate will be cheaper than Washington. Washington is a big tech state (Amazon, Microsoft, Boeing headquarters), not to mention heavyweights like Costco, Starbucks, Weyerhaeuser, etc. They too love the no state income tax, and big tech and big business ripples out into the economy -- meaning Seattle real estate prices are ridiculously high (not far from San Francisco pricing), Portland is rapidly catching up and right now is expensive, but still doable. The knock-on effects mean Southwest Washington real estate prices are climbing fast as well, though it's cheaper than all the rest, but more expensive than many parts of Arizona by a significant degree. There's no real estate bargains here, but the business climate is pretty darn good compared to many other coastal/blue states. And that's why their flooding in by the tens of thousands every year.

Last edited by USDefault; 06-12-2018 at 09:39 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-13-2018, 12:07 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,306 posts, read 39,574,242 times
Reputation: 23271
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug1245 View Post
I'm thinking of retiring to Vancouver from San Francisco. ...

General question, would you suggest staying at an extended stay hotel or renting a furnished apartment for a month or so? Or AirBnB? A C-D single retiree looking to relocate here spent last winter 'house-sitting' in a very nice Camas home. When searching for places I insist to stay with a local person (which I usually do anyway) https://wikitravel.org/en/Hospitality_exchange
...


Any suggestions or ideas appreciated. (I want a view (Water and or Mtns)).
Camas / Washougal and Mt Vista (and some areas in the south and north heights) are where you will find a view. (water and Mtns)

I LOVE my view!!!
as a retiree you will finally have time to enjoy it! I would INSIST on a view, and I certainly would not BUY without one (very EZ to resell, BUT the tax assessor likes views (and waterfront). (Fortunately... I have always had a view from day one / little kid) Colorado, WY, B.C (Thetis island), Spain, Switzerland, and even Singapore!!! (had a 30th story apartment and a high hill... with a 270 degree view). Even my 'lowly' (cheap) Hill Country TX places have full uninterrupted views. Will enjoy sunset there tomorrow! and a few sunrises too.

With a view... I could stay home ALL DAY! ... but... since I am not keen on rain... I stay AWAY most of the winter (and some of the summer).

Save that eyesight (as possible).

If you BUY... you might want to consider a multi-family place, or a larger home with a separate living space. (for income or for a future caregiver). I fit just fine in my cabins / guest homes / apartments / RV spaces... and rent I out the BIG house!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2018, 09:38 AM
 
Location: CA, OR & WA (Best Coast)
366 posts, read 258,148 times
Reputation: 269
As you know Portland is having a housing shortage, and that boils over to Vancouver. Our most recent residents are people that cashed out of Portland proper to come retire in downtown/uptown Vancouver. The rectangle is a housing hotspot. As you can see only two houses available, and they will not last, most listings sell in under a week. Spring came and went with only 5 or so listings in this area. So if anyone is serious about buying in this area you need to know how competitive the market is. The walk score, and no state income tax are bringing buyers from across the river and other states. I have two friends in CA that have a substantial amount of cash ready to buy a home in the area (when we find the right one.)

On the weather, if your questioning the gloomy weather you should not move to the PNW unless you can vacate for a few months in the winter.
Attached Thumbnails
Questions about retiring to Vancouver-golden-rectangle.jpg  
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2018, 12:10 PM
 
903 posts, read 1,059,978 times
Reputation: 2042
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyberous View Post
As you can see only two houses available, and they will not last, most listings sell in under a week. Spring came and went with only 5 or so listings in this area. So if anyone is serious about buying in this area you need to know how competitive the market is.
Especially if it's sub-$450k price, those places go quick. There still are pockets of affordability, where you'll see the occasional REO studio or 1-bedroom apartment for $165k near the Columbia, or a fixer for around $300k with a nice quarter-acre lot. These kinds of listings go pending by the end of the first week of being listed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2018, 03:03 PM
 
Location: WA
2,801 posts, read 3,913,588 times
Reputation: 3364
Quote:
Originally Posted by USDefault View Post
Especially if it's sub-$450k price, those places go quick. There still are pockets of affordability, where you'll see the occasional REO studio or 1-bedroom apartment for $165k near the Columbia, or a fixer for around $300k with a nice quarter-acre lot. These kinds of listings go pending by the end of the first week of being listed.
There are no secrets around here. In fact there is a lot of pent-up demand. Families in rentals all over the metro area with limited budgets who are looking to buy before prices or interest rates go up any further. So any listings, even fixer-uppers in marginal neighborhoods are getting snatched up fast if they are priced reasonably.

My parents live in modest neighborhood in North Salem. Houses around them are selling in less than a week, many to Portlanders or people who intend to commute to the Portland area. The house next door to them sold in a day to a Chinese guy who is commuting from Salem to Beaverton on a daily basis for a tech job. By comparison, a commute from anywhere in the Vancouver area would be easier than that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2018, 07:02 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,306 posts, read 39,574,242 times
Reputation: 23271
+/- for retirees.
  1. They have the freedom of time to look for a place, and are not 'school' location driven, and can schedule their routes / times to avoid traffic.
  2. There are MANY great retiree venues (for housing and for activities).
  3. Pretty stable services / sectors for retirees
  4. Probable RE valuation increases (if you buy right). and VERY ez for seniors to do the 24 month 500k tax free gains; PR swap. (an ex-coworker has done 9 of those in SWWA, and is now retired (since age 40))
  5. Weather is often easier to tolerate for seniors, as they are inside a larger % of their time, and can do errands during periods with less rain (and less people!).
Downside;
  1. a lot of time, seniors are in a HURRY to buy (they equate 'rent' to wasted $$, and are less likely to use alternative investments for their RE capital while renting)
  2. Property taxes.. (Mine went up over $10,000/ yr SINCE I retired.)
  3. Limited Vancouver transit options (Uber / Lyft / cVan can help)
  4. Disbursed services requiring a car.../ drivers (too spread out, no 'walkable' neighborhoods with access to groceries, medical (hospital), bus, and senior center)
Quote:
These kinds of listings go pending by the end of the first week of being listed.
thus... you AVOID buying anything that is listed! Seniors have more time for 'shopping' / digging up unlisted properties.

I have done ~11 prop transactions since I retired. (always looking for more, but am referring all my SWWA finds to others (4 this yr)

Last edited by StealthRabbit; 06-13-2018 at 07:10 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2018, 06:22 PM
 
14 posts, read 12,302 times
Reputation: 11
Researching further it confirms Portland has a great public transportation system and it may be that for someone wanting to be able to be car free at some point that is a better option. Portland is more expensive for housing but some of the outlying areas seem less pricey. I searched for over-55 communities and all were in the Portland area. Tigard has one that seems reasonably priced in terms of resale homes.


I'm thinking of taking the California Starlight to Portland on one of their short vacations. 3 days in Portland. Just to get a feel. If it looks good then an AirB&B for several weeks. That would allow time to check out Vancouver too. There are AirB&Bs in Irvington with shopping in walking distance and a bus line direct to downtown Portland.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-14-2018, 07:57 PM
 
Location: WA
2,801 posts, read 3,913,588 times
Reputation: 3364
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug1245 View Post
Researching further it confirms Portland has a great public transportation system and it may be that for someone wanting to be able to be car free at some point that is a better option. Portland is more expensive for housing but some of the outlying areas seem less pricey. I searched for over-55 communities and all were in the Portland area. Tigard has one that seems reasonably priced in terms of resale homes.


I'm thinking of taking the California Starlight to Portland on one of their short vacations. 3 days in Portland. Just to get a feel. If it looks good then an AirB&B for several weeks. That would allow time to check out Vancouver too. There are AirB&Bs in Irvington with shopping in walking distance and a bus line direct to downtown Portland.
Very good idea. Frankly if I was single and looking for a car-free or mostly car-free lifestyle I'd be looking at central Portland or some place along one of the light rail lines. Preferably within easy walking distance of a good grocery so you don't have to lug groceries on public transit.

Vancouver is really a lot more suburban. Perfect place if you got a couple kids and want the suburban lifestyle within commuting distance of the Portland metro. But not ideal if you want car-free. There is a small central urban core to Vancouver that is walkable but even that lacks a grocery although there apparently is one in the works. The entire Vancouver waterfront is undergoing an absolutely massive redevelopment that will eventually bring dozens of new high rise apartments and all manner of urban amenities. But that is years away from completion and will probably be a 10 year work in progress. Lots of areas of Portland are already fully developed and ready.

Tigard though is basically Vancouver south. It is pretty car-centric and not that different from Vancouver except that it probably has better bus service to Portland. The entire Tigard area is completely gridlocked during morning and afternoon commuting times way worse than Vancouver actually. So don't fixate on Tigard if you are looking for car-free. Look for more central Portland locations near a light rail line. The light rail is coming to Tigard but it is still probably 10 years away: https://www.oregonlive.com/expo/news...ne_10_thi.html

If you are looking for a walkable over 55 community, my parents are actually moving into this one in Canby (southeast of Portland): http://hopevillage.org/ in part because it is very pedestrian friendly. Lots of shopping and restaurants within easy walking or biking distance. Although Canby is a fairly small town on the very edge of the Portland metro area or frankly rathe rather outside of it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-15-2018, 01:40 AM
 
903 posts, read 1,059,978 times
Reputation: 2042
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug1245 View Post
and it may be that for someone wanting to be able to be car free at some point that is a better option.
This is an easy one. If you want to be car-free, Portland. Period. I'd look at all the districts, but especially Nob Hill Alphabet (i.e. anything off NW Lovejoy/Kearney) and south Pearl, maybe South Waterfront. I'm not as familiar with east of the Willamette, but maybe someone else can pipe in.

But, absolutely doable. And if you spend any time in Portland, you'll see a number of people doing very well with no car, just walking or biking to whatever they need. Breakfast, lunch, maybe dinner, shopping -- no car. It's a really attractive option.

On those occasions when distances are greater, take Lyft/Uber or get a car rental -- both of which are much, much cheaper than car ownership. I hate cars and all their attendant expenses (massive depreciation, insurance, maintenance and repairs, taxes and fees, fuel, storage). Such a waste of capital for something that, on average, sits idle in a garage or parking spot for ~ 98% of the time.

Also, whatever you do, quintuple-check the seismic soundness of any structure or building you are considering. A big Cascadia earthquake will hit. Could be tomorrow. Could be the year 2300. But it's coming, guaranteed. I'd hard-pass on any structure or building that can't withstand a 9+ hit. Especially in the Hills, which will be particularly susceptible. And don't trust the real estate agents, or even the home inspector, to render a qualified seismic opinion. Get an engineer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-15-2018, 08:16 PM
 
14 posts, read 12,302 times
Reputation: 11
Thanks so much USDefault and texasdriver. Portland is the way to go for what I am looking for. I will post on the Portland forum for specific neighborhood recommendations. I am in my early sixties and just retired (though working part-time) and an over 55 community is a possibility but better would a "mixed" neighborhood. With plenty of over 55s as well as millenials. The neighborhood I live in (1200 homes) has, according to the local flyer, only 8% of residents who are over 60. Most retired folks in the neighborhood move out of the Bay Area to cash out of their homes. Buy something cheaper and free up money. I'm in a position where the move is not to free up money but to have a better quality of life.


Prices are an issue to the extent I'd like a view of sorts. The Pearl is pricey and a great place to live but on the river and low. I'm planning to AirB&B in Irvington or that area and confirm the walkability. And go from there. It does seem one can be in the hills and near a transit line and shopping. Someone suggested checking out Beaverton but again I'll post on the Portland board to get ideas.


Thanks to everyone for the great information and insights.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Washington > Vancouver area
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. | Please obey Forum Rules | Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top