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Old 04-04-2012, 06:36 PM
 
7 posts, read 12,118 times
Reputation: 24

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This is my story, as a 'skilled worker' coming to Vancouver for work in the Biotech field. So the story goes like this...

I am young... and like many other 'young' people, I went to university and got my degrees... in engineering and medicine, making me a multi-disciplinary science wizard. I have lived and worked in New York City (Manhattan, to be specific) as well as in Scandinavia. After doing some research, I decided to move to Vancouver, but obviously I needed a work visa.

So I applied and got a work visa within weeks after applying for it. What a surprise. Those that have worked and gone through work visa's in US know what an extended and tedious task it is. But Canada... game changer, huh.. I was amazed! (but hey, this is not a success story.. so read on).

So I arrived in Vancouver. I knew many successful and innovative companies in Vancouver, so I thought that a person like me, with top-drawer degrees and work experience from abroad would land a job fairly quickly. So I gave it a couple of weeks. Actually, I sent out a few job applications prior to my arrival, and I continued doing so for the next couple of weeks that followed. I was used to have a good communication with the HR departments from the companies I previously worked for. They always called or emailed when I sent out applications. So I contacted various headhunter companies, and emailed as many people in the field as possible, to get my name out, and start establishing a relation with these people.
But I realized that the game was played differently in Vancouver. After sending out my 50th application, I started feeling that something was wrong. So I edited my resume, and wrote a new cover letter, reflecting how good I am at what I do.

So I got a call for an interview. I was later called in for a second interview in the same company. And weeks passed, and no further contact from the company. After emailing them, I was told that the position was offered to another candidate. Okay, miserable failure. Nothing I was really used to, but hey... I have a strong mind, and I stayed positive. I realized that spending time in the hot tub sparked new ideas on how I should proceed with the job hunt.

Lesson learned. After my 100th application, I started getting another 4 interview opportunities, in which all resulted in... let's say.. no jobs. So I thought, maybe I should change my strategy. And ever since, I have been stuck.

Vancouver wasn't really what I though it to be, job wise. Sure, the city is beautiful and the people are nice. Yada yada. But I have lived in so many other places, and quite frankly.. Vancouver isn't really that fabulous. So I won't even try to glorify the city by any means.

I am disappointed. And the reason is that I probably have understood the essence of the 'Canadian' economic stance. First of all, there are too many qualified people. And these people are not Canadians, but immigrants that came here just like me. Hey, I am not a resident, and I am not seeking citizenship nor do I possess a Permanent Residency card. I don't want it!

I only came here to work, and pay your taxes. And just live life. Perhaps rent an overpriced penthouse and treat my ridiculously ignorant belief of being a hot shot. Just like I did in Manhattan, living in the hot pot of hot shots, capitalism and commercialism. But in the US, in contrary to Canada, I could live the American dream. But in Canada, there is no Canadian dream. All there is to it, is just friendly people, much less greedy and more humane than Americans. And Canada is a darn good place if you just want to sit back and enjoy the sights. It reminds me of Europe, more specifically Scandinavia.. where people pay premium taxes and in return get good health care and good QOL (quality of life). But don't come to Vancouver for work if you are super-qualified. There will always be a couple of masterminds ahead of you. Most likely with dual PhD degrees.

And for those of you that are young, with strong academic backgrounds in scientific areas... please, please... there is something called CANADIAN WORK EXPERIENCE. And no matter how good you were, and how good you want to be.. there is limited opportunities for you in Vancouver. Unless you speak Mandarin or have a good friend that will do you a favor and put you on a $100,000+ salary with benefits. Even if you earned the double back home (wherever you originated from), don't believe you will start off right there immediately. I have been in here for 6 months, and am yet sending out my 2XXth application.... Gladly, I made good money in the past, and my savings account has been a good friend of mine for the past 6 months. I am more than happy to spend it here, but at some point you really get bored...

So bottom line... I am a little disappointed, but try to understand me rather than hate me. So let's start a discussion.. what can I do to better my situation in Vancouver for the coming month or two that I am willing to stay, before I call it a'day and head back to another destination (not Canada)?
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Old 04-05-2012, 11:15 AM
 
2 posts, read 7,196 times
Reputation: 17
Sohox, good that you shared your story. I was actually thinking of coming to Vancouver. Now I'll think again...
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Old 04-05-2012, 05:46 PM
 
Location: B.C., Canada
13,510 posts, read 12,291,472 times
Reputation: 31179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sohox View Post

Hey, I am not a resident, and I am not seeking citizenship nor do I possess a Permanent Residency card. I don't want it!

I only came here to work, and pay your taxes. And just live life.

.. what can I do to better my situation in Vancouver for the coming month or two that I am willing to stay, before I call it a'day and head back to another destination (not Canada)?
There's probably not much you can do to better your employment situation in Vancouver at this stage of the game. You most likely won't find work after all this time, the reason being because you are not a resident, you are not seeking citizenship nor to possess a Permanent Residency card and you don't want it, you only came to find temporary work and live life here for a short while and have a good time .... and now you're going to be leaving in a month or two.

Employers who are looking to fill high paying positions want permanency, not transiency. They are looking for reliable and committed employees that they can count on, who are wanting to commit themselves to staying with the employer, to becoming Canadian citizens or PR's, and to contributing of themselves to the betterment of the employer's objectives, and contributing to the betterment of the community and the nation. They don't want transient employees who are just passing through, that they know are only going to stay temporarilly while they live life and have a good time and then run away, leaving the employer to having to start all over again to find another new employee who's willing to commit themself. Giving a job to a transient person is taking away a job from a permanent person - it's costly to the employer who is looking for commitment and it's costly to the employee that is looking for permanency and is willing to commit.

.

Last edited by Zoisite; 04-05-2012 at 06:01 PM..
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Old 04-06-2012, 03:59 AM
 
2 posts, read 7,196 times
Reputation: 17
Zoisite

Of course, you're right, however, the employer cannot guarantee nor request commitment.
Even if somebody is planning to reside in Vancouver permanently they can always find a better offer, or the employer can decide that they don't want to continue working with this person.

I am a Canadian citizen living abroad now. Thinking of coming back, but future in Vancouver hardly seems bright, unfortunately
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Old 04-06-2012, 04:27 AM
 
105 posts, read 205,858 times
Reputation: 42
I've really lived with your story, but I have a question; Why don't you go back to your country?

6 moths is quite enough to read the situation there and take your decision.

My friend don't prolong your residency unless you have strong reasons that make you not wanting to come back.
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Old 04-06-2012, 12:33 PM
 
3,060 posts, read 7,938,639 times
Reputation: 3279
My perspective it this: you say you're young, you've lived and worked in Scandanavia and New York. You've worked with numerous companies and numerous HR departments. In other words, you move around a lot. You change jobs a lot. No one I know would be interested in hiring someone who is going to be off and running after a short while.
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Old 04-09-2012, 07:36 AM
 
Location: Cambridge, MA/London, UK
3,762 posts, read 4,892,061 times
Reputation: 3185
Whether the OP is viewed as transient or not, you cannot ignore the fact that many people with International education and experience find themselves running into ridiculous roadblocks once emigrating to Canada.

I find it strange that Canada has a strict point system to supposedly hand pick the "best" but once they arrive they are misused and skills wasted. If the OP applied for a job in the US, especially in a major Biotech area like Boston, SF, SD, Houston, etc..they would have a high paying job lined up quickly. US employers do not have the same hang up with International credentials that Canadian employers do.
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Old 04-09-2012, 08:42 AM
 
3,060 posts, read 7,938,639 times
Reputation: 3279
Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardsyzzurphands View Post
Whether the OP is viewed as transient or not, you cannot ignore the fact that many people with International education and experience find themselves running into ridiculous roadblocks once emigrating to Canada.

I find it strange that Canada has a strict point system to supposedly hand pick the "best" but once they arrive they are misused and skills wasted. If the OP applied for a job in the US, especially in a major Biotech area like Boston, SF, SD, Houston, etc..they would have a high paying job lined up quickly. US employers do not have the same hang up with International credentials that Canadian employers do.
Absolutely agree with you. Maybe the OP doesn't interview well. Or maybe he should go back stateside.
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Old 04-09-2012, 07:52 PM
 
4,253 posts, read 9,076,251 times
Reputation: 5131
Ouch, my eyes! Did I understand it correctly that the OP referred to a $100K salary in a condescending manner, as if minimum tolerable? This is not 10 years ago, when biotechs were hot cakes; Vancouver as a biotech hub? Doesn't hold to MA. And yes, there is oversupply of people with credentials looking for $30-40K salary (these times), across Canada. The Canadian government is scrapping the "hand-picking best" program as they realize that during 5-8 years of waiting a lot changes:

News Release – Government of Canada transforms economic immigration program

OP, why did you even made the move in the worst economic times at all? What was wrong with Manhattan or even with its close neighbor, Boston?
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Old 04-10-2012, 12:32 AM
 
Location: B.C., Canada
13,510 posts, read 12,291,472 times
Reputation: 31179
Quote:
Originally Posted by nuala View Post
.... The Canadian government is scrapping the "hand-picking best" program as they realize that during 5-8 years of waiting a lot changes:

News Release – Government of Canada transforms economic immigration program
Oh, now that was interesting. I see in their other recent news releases there's also one that addresses the point that edwardsyzzurphands brought up about people with international education and experience running into roadblocks when they emigrate.

News Release – Minister Kenney proposes to assess foreign education credentials before skilled workers arrive

.
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