U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada > Vancouver
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-01-2013, 05:42 PM
 
1,244 posts, read 762,091 times
Reputation: 945
Default Vancouver's decline in tv and film production

Vancouver, Canada, sees sharp drop-off in movie, TV production - latimes.com

Explanation of Vancouver's decline in film/tv production in LA Times article
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-02-2013, 02:45 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
2,741 posts, read 1,268,695 times
Reputation: 1623
Quote:
Originally Posted by phoenixmike11 View Post
Vancouver, Canada, sees sharp drop-off in movie, TV production - latimes.com

Explanation of Vancouver's decline in film/tv production in LA Times article
There is a lot more competition out there now, so it's not surprising. I think it will come back when new incentives are implemented.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-03-2013, 07:28 AM
 
1,287 posts, read 1,508,615 times
Reputation: 725
No surprise. The forum here is replete with posts about how expensive it already is to live and work in the area. To add another 'incentive' just means another cost burden to the residents. Incentives have limits and Vancouver has reached it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-03-2013, 10:01 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
4,578 posts, read 2,608,731 times
Reputation: 2741
I don't think Canada needs more "incentives" for its film industry. Too much junk out there already from both sides of the 49th!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-03-2013, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
2,741 posts, read 1,268,695 times
Reputation: 1623
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
I don't think Canada needs more "incentives" for its film industry. Too much junk out there already from both sides of the 49th!
Yes a lot of junk, and I really wonder why some of it is made. They must know it's junk? However it is a business so someone must be making money for it to survive. Unlike the other poster, I do believe incentives work, and when Canada's dollar was lower, that was one built in incentive that really worked. Not so much now, even though Ontario is still pulling productions in.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-03-2013, 03:54 PM
 
Location: San Francisco, CA
310 posts, read 211,646 times
Reputation: 197
Movie business aside, I think Vancouver needs to focus on bringing in more business period.

For such a beautiful city, natural harbor, nice housing stock, etc, I'm surprised there aren't more "big ticket" companies based in Vancouver. Maybe this will change in the future?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-19-2013, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Seattle, Washington
1,333 posts, read 835,822 times
Reputation: 714
From an Outsider of the city, I think Vancouver needs to refocus its economy anyways. Focus on attracted big business to the area. Establish a tech industry like Seattle.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-21-2013, 11:00 PM
 
2 posts, read 2,600 times
Reputation: 10
Toronto has always been and will always remain Canada's business hub due to it's close proximity to New York, Chicago & Detroit.

Hollywood started enjoying Vancouver in 1980's when Stephen J. Cannel came for a camping adventure & fell in love with the cities beauty and timmed year round climate. Along with the lower Canadian dollar vs the US Green back he decided to set up shot and produced series such as "21 Jump Street", "Wise Guy", "The Commish", "Booker" and "McGyver". Soon after more and more L.A. based filmed entertainment professionals took notice of the cities growing industry, eager crews, having the same time zone, being only 3 hours away from LA by air and the Provincial Governments implemented Film & Television Production Tax Credits offered to forgein producers, the city started seeing crews every where and series like "The X-Files", "Dark Angel" and features "First Blood", "Bird on a Wire", "Rocky Part lV', "Cousins" etc., etc. being made in their back yards.

Jump ahead 33 years and after hundreds of notable series and feature films, Vancouver had grown into the third largest filmed entertainment production hub in North America with some of the worlds top notch crews, 5 major film studio's with over 30 sound stages, top level equipment and post production houses and indirectly employing over 30,000 British Colombians.

Canada has a coast-to-coast population of 30 million which is not enough to sustain it's own indigenous film industry. Thus we rely on the United States, Europe and most recently Asia for not just film and television produced in Canada but for 80% of all industry(s) import and export. And it's not just the film industry that receives both Provincial and Federal 'insentives' (Tax Credits). Mining, Natural Resources, Fishing, Lumber/Forestry and all Manufacturing sectors receive them
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-22-2013, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
9,474 posts, read 10,086,012 times
Reputation: 3649
Quote:
Originally Posted by petercarr View Post
Toronto has always been and will always remain Canada's business hub due to it's close proximity to New York, Chicago & Detroit.

Hollywood started enjoying Vancouver in 1980's when Stephen J. Cannel came for a camping adventure & fell in love with the cities beauty and timmed year round climate. Along with the lower Canadian dollar vs the US Green back he decided to set up shot and produced series such as "21 Jump Street", "Wise Guy", "The Commish", "Booker" and "McGyver". Soon after more and more L.A. based filmed entertainment professionals took notice of the cities growing industry, eager crews, having the same time zone, being only 3 hours away from LA by air and the Provincial Governments implemented Film & Television Production Tax Credits offered to forgein producers, the city started seeing crews every where and series like "The X-Files", "Dark Angel" and features "First Blood", "Bird on a Wire", "Rocky Part lV', "Cousins" etc., etc. being made in their back yards.

Jump ahead 33 years and after hundreds of notable series and feature films, Vancouver had grown into the third largest filmed entertainment production hub in North America with some of the worlds top notch crews, 5 major film studio's with over 30 sound stages, top level equipment and post production houses and indirectly employing over 30,000 British Colombians.

Canada has a coast-to-coast population of 30 million which is not enough to sustain it's own indigenous film industry. Thus we rely on the United States, Europe and most recently Asia for not just film and television produced in Canada but for 80% of all industry(s) import and export. And it's not just the film industry that receives both Provincial and Federal 'insentives' (Tax Credits). Mining, Natural Resources, Fishing, Lumber/Forestry and all Manufacturing sectors receive them
This is a popular fallacy. In reality, 34 million people is more than enough to sustain a vibrant Canadian domestic film and TV industry. Consider that the film and TV industries in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver are all in the annual 1-billion dollar range. Vancouver's industry is almost completely dominated by Hollywood North productions, and American stuff also comprises a huge share of the industry in Toronto. Montreal's industry on the other hand is roughly 85% domestic. And for the most part these Montreal productions only have an audience in Quebec which totals 7-8 million people.

The problem with the industry Canada-wide is not that there are *only* (sic) 34 million people in Canada (or maybe 26 million people outside Quebec which are the main market for Canadian productions not in French), but rather that those 34 or 26 million people by and large aren't interested in watching Canadian productions.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2013, 04:06 PM
 
2 posts, read 2,600 times
Reputation: 10
Unfortunately population does play a big role when asking why Canada can't sustain it's own indigenous film industry. the average Hollywood feature budget sits between $50 and $200 million. In 2012 Telefilm Canada, Canada's main film & television funding source, distributed a total amount of $130 million. In terms of private sector film & television investment?, there is little and those that do exist tend work only with the large studio / networks where there is a small risk involved. Added the fact the American studios & networks spend billions on advertising to a population 5 times that of Canada and profits equally.


So yes, population is a main reason why Canada can't sustain it's own film and television production industry.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada > Vancouver
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:57 PM.

© 2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top