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Old 01-01-2012, 04:37 PM
 
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Do you allow your children to eat meat?
Why? Or why not?

If you are Vegan, do you make your children follow a vegan diet?

What if your child wants meat or dairy products?

Last edited by jasper12; 01-01-2012 at 04:43 PM.. Reason: edit
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Old 01-02-2012, 06:57 AM
 
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i don't have kids, but i've thought about this.

i think if i have kids, i will raise them vegan and teach them my values as they relate to diet. once they are old enough to somewhat understand the implications of dietary choices (i'm guessing that's, like... 6?), they can have meat or dairy products if they request them (just like they can go to church/temple if they want to even though i don't). they would probably have to buy/prepare it themselves (especially meat) although i don't know whether i'd stick to that in practice.

i think i'd probably let them eat whatever when they're over at friends' houses, as long as *they* are ok with that. i wouldn't want to isolate them socially because of their diet, although i'd send food along with them when possible and appropriate.
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Old 01-02-2012, 07:22 AM
 
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My children were very young when I became vegetarian. I cooked vegetarian at home, but at restaurants, or when eating at the homes of friends or relatives they could eat meat if they chose.

Many times they ate burgers or chicken, but they didn't care much for steaks, pork, or roast. And often they would order cheese or veggie pizza, or a veggie sandwich.

They grew up experiencing tasty veggie meals and learning about the benefits to a vegetarian diet. My daughter has several friends who are vegetarian, and now she very seldom eats meat at all. My oldest son eats only fish or very occasionally chicken, but plans toward a total vegetarian diet. My younger son does eat meat, but is very health conscious, and I hope that some day he too will switch to a vegetarian diet.
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Old 01-02-2012, 08:48 AM
 
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DH and his three siblings were all raised vegetarian by vegetarian parents. He did not taste meat until he was 18, and moved out on his own. They were vegetarian due to religion (Seventh Day Adventist), so any relatives, friends, or acquaintances who they associated with were also vegetarian. They were never exposed to meat eating. Only one of his sisters has remained vegetarian (and she is the only one who remained SDA). Our oldest daughter adopted vegetarianism when she was 13, because she was against slaughtering animals for food. We supported her choice. To be honest, I thought it was a "phase", but she is now 26 and still a vegetarian.
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Old 01-02-2012, 09:03 AM
 
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Thanks for answering. I rarely cook ar eat meat, just because I don't care for it, not out of any ethical issues. My daughter also rarely eats meat.

I have a vegetarian (work) friend, who forbids her children to eat meat. She goes to great lengths to make sure they are not exposed to any animal products, she won't let them go to parties, or anything. Seems a bit extreme to me, after all they are children. But I suppose it is the same for any dietary restrictions a parent has, such as being kosher, they can have children follow the same dietary regimen.
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Old 01-02-2012, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
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LOL, made me think of Children of the Corn.
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Old 01-03-2012, 06:39 AM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
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Yeah, not allowing your kids to go to parties, etc. is pretty damn extreme. Sounds like she's got some issues to deal with personally that she's projecting onto her children...

I've thought about this matter myself; ultimately, a lot of it will have to do with whether or not I end up having children with a woman who is also vegetarian. I view vegetarianism as a personal choice and don't push it on anyone, and most of the women I've dated or had relationships with have not been vegetarian, at least not initially... some have decided to give it a try while they're with me, or have been influenced to do so by my cooking

If we were both vegetarian, I don't necessarily see any reason that I'd prepare meals that included meat for my child when myself and their mother wouldn't eat it. The child would doubtlessly wonder why we ate different things from them and this would be confusing. It's been proven far and wide that children can be raised on a healthy vegetarian diet with absolutely no health concerns that they wouldn't have otherwise, and so I don't see why this would be a bad thing (my best friend, for example, was raised vegetarian and is 6'8 and in perfect shape).

If my spouse does eat meat, then I won't object to our children being raised eating meat so long as there's no aversion towards the fact that I don't, and she's open to the notion of our children having a vegetarian diet if they so desire. She can cook for them... the smell of cooking meat absolutely revolts me and makes me sick to my stomach, so practically speaking, that's the way it'd have to happen.

Another thing that I think is important to remember is that kids rebel, and kids will be drawn, at some point or another, to something that was forbidden from them for some time. I had an ex whose mom refused to let her eat fruit snacks (Fruit by the Foot, Gushers, etc), mass-market chips (Doritos, Fritos) or ice cream (Dreyer's, Breyers, etc) or sodas - ever. My parents rarely bought the above for us, primarily because we were broke... but regardless, by the time I was about ten, I was over those waxy fruit snacks and could have cared less if I ever tasted them again. But with her... always, all the time. We were living together in our early 20's and she was buying Gushers and Fruit By The Foot as snacks. Nice job, mom

A kid who's raised in a mercurial no-meat household is going to bite into a cheeseburger first chance they get, and even if they get sick, they may continue to eat them when given the opportunity just cause.
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Old 01-05-2012, 04:08 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post
Yeah, not allowing your kids to go to parties, etc. is pretty damn extreme. Sounds like she's got some issues to deal with personally that she's projecting onto her children...

I've thought about this matter myself; ultimately, a lot of it will have to do with whether or not I end up having children with a woman who is also vegetarian. I view vegetarianism as a personal choice and don't push it on anyone, and most of the women I've dated or had relationships with have not been vegetarian, at least not initially... some have decided to give it a try while they're with me, or have been influenced to do so by my cooking

If we were both vegetarian, I don't necessarily see any reason that I'd prepare meals that included meat for my child when myself and their mother wouldn't eat it. The child would doubtlessly wonder why we ate different things from them and this would be confusing. It's been proven far and wide that children can be raised on a healthy vegetarian diet with absolutely no health concerns that they wouldn't have otherwise, and so I don't see why this would be a bad thing (my best friend, for example, was raised vegetarian and is 6'8 and in perfect shape).

If my spouse does eat meat, then I won't object to our children being raised eating meat so long as there's no aversion towards the fact that I don't, and she's open to the notion of our children having a vegetarian diet if they so desire. She can cook for them... the smell of cooking meat absolutely revolts me and makes me sick to my stomach, so practically speaking, that's the way it'd have to happen.

Another thing that I think is important to remember is that kids rebel, and kids will be drawn, at some point or another, to something that was forbidden from them for some time. I had an ex whose mom refused to let her eat fruit snacks (Fruit by the Foot, Gushers, etc), mass-market chips (Doritos, Fritos) or ice cream (Dreyer's, Breyers, etc) or sodas - ever. My parents rarely bought the above for us, primarily because we were broke... but regardless, by the time I was about ten, I was over those waxy fruit snacks and could have cared less if I ever tasted them again. But with her... always, all the time. We were living together in our early 20's and she was buying Gushers and Fruit By The Foot as snacks. Nice job, mom

A kid who's raised in a mercurial no-meat household is going to bite into a cheeseburger first chance they get, and even if they get sick, they may continue to eat them when given the opportunity just cause.
This is definitely true in the case of my DH and his siblings - in addition to meat, they were also not exposed to the consumption of alcohol, caffeine - and extremely limited sugar. DH never tasted candy until he was 7 years old. Three of the four siblings now not only consume meat and sugar, they also drink coffee and alcoholic beverages. Their parents, however, are now in their 80's, very healthy (healthier than their children, anyway) and still adhere to their strict dietary rules.
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Old 01-05-2012, 04:14 AM
 
Location: Texas
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My cousins are vegetarians (culturally, as their parents moved here from India) and they are raising their kids vegetarian...
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Old 01-17-2012, 02:07 AM
Status: "LILY DALE!" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
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I have two teenagers - 18 and almost 16. We were already lacto ovo vegetarians when we had our children. Dealing with meat was not an option.

We NEVER told them what to eat out side of the home. That was up to them. They have missed out on nothing.

My son is now a strict vegetarian. My daughter occasionally eats fish, but is not sure that she is comfortable with it.

They are tall, slender, clear skinned and healthy. All of the people who predicted that my children would be sickly were wrong!

My husband and I are (almost) vegans now.
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