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Old 04-30-2013, 10:02 PM
 
Location: Michigan
2,198 posts, read 2,237,109 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cliffie View Post
The science community is only gradually coming to understand that vegetables have things in them that you need to survive. Only a few years ago I was sitting in a lecture by the home ec trainer for the Cooperative Extension Service and she told us with a straight face that corn has no nutritional value. None. That information is straight out of the 1950s, for pete's sake, and they're still spreading it around as if it were fact.
Corn isn't a vegetable though.
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Old 04-30-2013, 10:12 PM
 
Location: Michigan
2,198 posts, read 2,237,109 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cliffie View Post

The whole point of genetic modification of plants is usually to increase their nutritional content -- like the rice they came up with a few years ago that has more carotenes in it than regular rice. Or they modify it to produce more ears to the stalk, or resist fungus better, or whatever.
Unfortunately, the whole point of GMOs is to make money by patenting DNA so that farmers can't save their own seed and instead have to buy seeds from Monsanto or Dupont every year. A steady profit stream from ownership of living organisms- economic rents courtesy of Diamond v. Chakrabarty and their Washington hirelings.
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Old 04-30-2013, 11:06 PM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
5,288 posts, read 17,915,856 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EugeneOnegin View Post
Unfortunately, the whole point of GMOs is to make money by patenting DNA so that farmers can't save their own seed and instead have to buy seeds from Monsanto or Dupont every year. A steady profit stream from ownership of living organisms- economic rents courtesy of Diamond v. Chakrabarty and their Washington hirelings.
Absolutely right.
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Old 08-16-2013, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Alaska
4,977 posts, read 4,500,167 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tekkie View Post
On another C-D sub-forum, this poster is arguing that vegetables add little to no nutrition to your diet. This goes against pretty much every practical thing I ever thought I knew about vegetables. Now, since I'm too tired (and lazy) at the moment to do any significant digging, I figured I'd come to the veggie crowd for their insights. Have you ever heard or read about substantial cases where raw vegetables were not considered nutritional? I'm not talking about veggies with pesticides here. I'm simply talking about raw, unadulterated vegetables. Is this guy just spouting off ignorant non-sense, or am I off base here?

I am trying to grow Crowder Peas (a cousin to Black-eyed peas) in my garden this summer. Summer is almost over here and I have plants with beautiful leaves but no peas. Another month to go and the temperatures will drop below freezing so there is little chance that I'll get peas this year.

What to do? Eat the leaves! So, I will harvest them at the last minute (forever hoping for some beans) and take a bite. I could foresee them as a nice addition to a salad. If raw is unappealing to the taste buds, then I will cook them. I can foresee a simple saute at first and then take it from there.

Quote:
Cowpeas are widely grown in East Africa and Southeast Asia, primarily as a leafy vegetable. The amount of protein content of cowpea's leafy parts consumed annually in Africa and Asia is equivalent to 5 million tonnes of dry cowpea seeds, representing as much as 30% of the total food legume production in the lowland tropics.
Cowpea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 08-16-2013, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Alaska
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Because I am growing and eating a lot of broccoli and broccoli leaves this summer, I decided to look up what that wonderful plant is giving me in its raw form. Good and healthy eating!

Broccoli florets:
Show Foods

Broccoli leaves:
Show Foods


This is a great website if one wants to find information about dietary contents of food and food items.

Foods List
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Old 08-16-2013, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Volcano
12,971 posts, read 23,536,189 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EugeneOnegin View Post
Unfortunately, the whole point of GMOs is to make money by patenting DNA so that farmers can't save their own seed and instead have to buy seeds from Monsanto or Dupont every year.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cattknap View Post
Absolutely right.
Not really. Farmers haven't been able to save their seeds from hybrid corn ever since it was introduced in the 1930s by the University of Kansas. It's just been part of the deal since then that if you want to grow Pioneer or DeKalb or Asgrow, or any other hybrid varieties you had to buy fresh seed from them each year. And those varieties were patented without GMO technology. All it takes is creating a new variety using any of a number of different techniques, including selective breeding and crossbreeding. The Hass avocado was patented by a Long Beach mailman and part time grower in 1935, and he controlled the right to propagate his variety until the patent ran out in 1952.

GMOs are produced for all kinds of reasons, by all kinds of organizations, of all different sizes. The GMO papaya that saved the Hawaiian industry was produced by a single researcher with a part-time assistant, and distributed free of charge to growers. The Golden Rice project was done as a humanitarian effort, and the patent placed in the public domain so that nobody profits.

And second, GMO research is being conducted by both Government and NGO organizations, and by both profit-seeking and not-for-profit organizations, universities and consortiums all over the world, with many different motivations and intents, including making food more nutritious and making farmers more productive.
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Old 08-17-2013, 07:36 AM
 
Location: Washington Park, Denver
6,904 posts, read 6,494,653 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EugeneOnegin View Post
Unfortunately, the whole point of GMOs is to make money by patenting DNA so that farmers can't save their own seed and instead have to buy seeds from Monsanto or Dupont every year. A steady profit stream from ownership of living organisms- economic rents courtesy of Diamond v. Chakrabarty and their Washington hirelings.
That's not the whole point. GMO crops are made so that they can withstand pesticides and weed killers better, meaning that more chemicals can be applied without killing them.

The biggest selling GMO seed is marketed as "Roundup Ready".
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Old 08-17-2013, 07:57 AM
 
4,030 posts, read 4,829,065 times
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Getting back to the OP's question, there is an argument to be made about buying fresh produce at the store that has been picked, packed, shipped, shelved, stocked and it may be 1-2 weeks from the field before you buy it and still another several days before you prepare & eat it. In that amount of time, the original nutrients level has dropped tremendously for some things, such as Vit. C.

Oftentimes, you get better nutrient levels from fresh-frozen foods, where the processing plants are close to the fields and the veggies are fully processed within hours, than you get from "fresh" produce at the grocery store. And many times at quite a cost savings.

I get most of my produce these days at the local farmer's markets and know I'm getting heirloom, pesticide-free, picked yesterday produce. But in the wintertime, I buy most of my green veg frozen except for things where I want the texture from the fresh veg that would be lost in the frozen item.
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Old 08-17-2013, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Volcano
12,971 posts, read 23,536,189 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyDog77 View Post
That's not the whole point. GMO crops are made so that they can withstand pesticides and weed killers better, meaning that more chemicals can be applied without killing them.
Some are, many are not. That's only one possible use of the technology. As a matter of fact, one of the other uses of transgenic technologies is to reduce the amount of chemicals needed. Leading environmentalist Mark Lynas, who was one of the founders of the ant-GMO movement, made a major speech at the Oxford Farming Conference in January in which he announced that he had been wrong to oppose GMOs, and that he now sees how these technologies are the best way to save the environment, by reducing the amount of fertilizer and pesticides used, fighting insects and viruses, increasing productivity and nutritional content.

Don't make the common mistake of thinking that GMO = Monsanto, because it doesn't. There are literally thousands of research projects going on which have nothing at all to do with Monsanto or Roundup.
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Old 08-17-2013, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Volcano
12,971 posts, read 23,536,189 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weezycom View Post
I get most of my produce these days at the local farmer's markets and know I'm getting heirloom, pesticide-free, picked yesterday produce. But in the wintertime, I buy most of my green veg frozen except for things where I want the texture from the fresh veg that would be lost in the frozen item.
Absolutely! I buy as much of my food as I can at the farmers markets where local produce is sold. And I agree that frozen food is often better than fresh that has been picked green and shipped a long distance. Another valuable resource is growing your own. Not everyone has the time or space to have a full garden, but anyone can grow some peppers in a pot or some herbs on a windowsill, and it all helps to improve nutrition.

The biggest obstacle to getting the best nutrition, in my opinion, is an overdependence on "convenience." That's what drives people to buy so much processed food instead of preparing from fresh ingredients.
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