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Old 04-09-2013, 01:40 AM
 
Location: Volcano
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtaustin View Post
If you're correct (and I don't doubt it), then the author of the book aforementioned is misinformed on both counts.
Funny, I went on a fact checking expedition after you said this... and discovered that the 100 chews technique comes up easily in an internet search today, but I never heard of it 30 years ago. "Mama Tomiko" in Japan seems to be a leader of this school of thinking: Easy Macrobiotics with Mama Tomiko-Healthy Japanese Cooking with "Mama Tomiko"-

She also mentions pressure cooking brown rice, which was my preferred method when I was following the macrobiotic way 100%. It's not that it shortened cooking time and preserves nutrients, as it does with vegetables, so much as that it produces a soft, fluffy brown rice that is easy to eat. Here's Mama Tomiko's recipe for cooking brown rice in a pressure cooker. It's similar to my way, except I include a piece of kombu seaweed to help soften the rice. Notice that she mentions soaking the rice before cooking for only 30 minutes to an hour. Macrobiotic Recipes: Your Secret Weapon for Beauty-Healthy Japanese Cooking with "Mama Tomiko"-

Today I've mostly moved to another way of preparing brown rice that is more complex, but seems to offer health benefits related to longevity. It is called GABBA brown rice, which you can Google, and it involves a long soak in warm water before cooking to activate certain enzymes. Perhaps this is why the book suggested an overnight soak? In any case, since brown rice is so much a part of my normal diet today, I invested a couple of years ago in a rather pricey induction heating rice cooker with automatic GABBA rice cycle that just manages it all for me.
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Old 04-09-2013, 11:19 AM
 
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There are a lot of unfamiliar but frequently-mentioned ingredients in the book; I didn't find them in the local grocery, which is a new Market Street with a lot of items not found elsewhere in my town. I don't know if I would like these things or be able to eat them. As a cook based in the southern tradition, my process is usually to vary the recipes to suit my taste, thus Oklahoma-Chinese food, Oklahoma-Mexican food. Animal products, sugar, white flour, oil (aside from soy or olive oil), are all verboten to me.

I've got to run, but I'll append a list of these items this afternoon.

Thanks for all your input!!!!
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Old 04-09-2013, 01:47 PM
 
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I do use seseme oil and tahini, but have not used seitan or tempah, though seen them mentioned frequently. Here are the items with which I am totally unfamiliar:

umeboshi vinegar
shoyu
mochi
amasaki
mirin (or sake? - so it's an alcohol?)

Edamame is available in all sorts of forms at the grocery here, but I have no idea what to do with them.
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Old 04-10-2013, 03:05 PM
 
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This is the brand of moshi that I get at health food groceries, even comes in gluten-free I believe:
mochi brands - Google Search

It puffs up into a delightful treat out of the oven!!

Shoyu is a type of soy sauce.

I think that is amazake, fermented rice drink:
Google Image Result for http://www.grainaissance.com/images/amazake.jpg

Umeboshi plums are used in the center of vegetarian sushi, make with a bamboo roller with nori seaweed sheets & brown rice. I've never tried the umeboshi vinegar.
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Old 04-10-2013, 08:20 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
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I used to snack on mochi but haven't found it in years. Could be because I now live out in the middle of nowhere and there are no natural food stores. It would poof up in the oven and be sweet and delectable without being sugary, sort of sticky.

Umeboshi plums were expensive and very salty, if I remember correctly.

I will say that one problem I had with the macrobiotic diet was the high level of salt.

Another problem was that if you fall off the diet, it is very tempting to not get back on again. You have to be strict. But by being strict you start to feel better and better--well I did to a point until I got too weak because I hated fish and wasn't getting enough protein.

It's about balance. It's more than dietary balance, it's about balance in all aspects of your life.
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Old 04-13-2013, 01:14 AM
 
Location: Volcano
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtaustin View Post
Here are the items with which I am totally unfamiliar:

umeboshi vinegar
umeboshi are a pickled or dried fruit (commonly called a plum, but actually more like an apricot) which are very sour and very salty (and eaten in small amounts, usually with rice), and which are prized as a healthy digestif. The fresh fruits are packed in barrels of salt to ferment and dry, and the juice that accumulates at the bottom of the barrel is called "umeboshi vinegar," although it is not really a vinegar. It is used as a condiment, or drunk in small quantities as a tonic.

Quote:
shoyu
Shoyu is Japanese soy sauce, made from soybeans, roasted wheat, sea salt, and koji (a mold culture) which is mixed together and fermented. Shoyu is different from Chinese Soy Sauce. Nama shoyu is an unpasteurized shoyu prized by some raw food adherents. You'll also hear Tamari mentioned, which is made without wheat and is thicker. And Miso is a related product that is a fermented soybean paste that is mixed with boiling water to make a savory soup that is considered very healthy. Many Japanese people eat miso soup for breakfast.

Quote:
mochi
Rice cakes made from pounded sticky rice. Can be used many ways. Has a velvety texture. Very high in protein. Popular ice cream is made with it.

Quote:
amasaki
Amazake is a fermented rice drink, either low alcohol or no alcohol, yet another in the family of Japanese foods that are fermented using a koji mold culture.

Quote:
mirin (or sake? - so it's an alcohol?)
It's a type of sake, but low alcohol and much sweeter, used as a condiment.

Quote:
Edamame is available in all sorts of forms at the grocery here, but I have no idea what to do with them.
These are green soybeans that are steamed, shelled from the pod, and eaten as a vegetable. In Japanese restaurants they are commonly served steamed, in the pod, as an appetizer. You insert the pod most of the way into your mouth, close your mouth until your teeth almost touch, and then pull the pod out to strip the beans into your mouth, and then discard the pod. In the supermarket the shelled beans are available frozen, to be added to stews and soups, or just eaten as a vegetable.
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Old 04-15-2013, 08:05 AM
 
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I'm going to see if I can find dashi today. I really like the taste of miso, but according to some recipes online for miso soup, one should wait to add the miso after cooking the other ingredients in order to get the full benefit. Also going to get the edamame, though it's in the frozen vegetable section.

Chewing a lot is a difficult habit to establish, at least for me. But all of this is, I am convinced, more healthy, both for the individual and the environment. And it's really not a diet or a temporary fix but a change in personal philosophy. But I'm preaching to the choir.

Looking forward to the miso soup, and not buying, today, whole wheat bread and tortillas, fake meat and a host of other things I usually purchase.

Last edited by jtaustin; 04-15-2013 at 08:14 AM..
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Old 04-15-2013, 08:12 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
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I'm so glad you're going on the diet because I do think it's a healthy one--and for me, you are inspiring me to get back on. I have the miso in the fridge. I used to make miso soup every morning and for greens in it I used mustard greens. Yes, you are supposed to wait until the soup cools a little bit before adding the miso.

I hope I can remember how to make it. I think it was mainly water, seaweed (which I have), greens, take it off the burner and let it cool a bit and add the miso. The house will smell like low tide.
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Old 04-15-2013, 08:20 AM
 
532 posts, read 908,393 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
I'm so glad you're going on the diet because I do think it's a healthy one--and for me, you are inspiring me to get back on. I have the miso in the fridge. I used to make miso soup every morning and for greens in it I used mustard greens. Yes, you are supposed to wait until the soup cools a little bit before adding the miso.

I hope I can remember how to make it. I think it was mainly water, seaweed (which I have), greens, take it off the burner and let it cool a bit and add the miso. The house will smell like low tide.
If you google it there are a lot of recipes online. I like the one with green onions and potatoes. Why would the house smell like low tide. Does dashi have fish in it? I bet it does. Oops. No good for me, then, but I think you can instead use vegetable bouillion. I'm not going to eat anything that has the remains of any dead animals in it, if I can help it.

Another new idea I came across is that, in cooking beans, soak them overnight with a carrot or ginger in the water, then the next morning, dump the carrot or ginger, and the water, and then boil the beans in new water for a while, then dump that water, then you can cook the beans (I use a crock pot), as you normally do. This sounds good to me.
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Old 04-15-2013, 08:28 AM
 
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In the book I mentioned, she talks about "sludge," and how sludge can be vacated (my expression) from the body by eating macrobiotically and chewing, as a habit as often as possible. I don't agree with every single thing she says in the book (she likes Madonna, of all things), but most of it is very good, IMHO.

I really want to affect these changes in my life, but what is called to mind (among other things) is this notion of the Ordeal of Change, which is a book by a writer from the 60's, Eric Hoffer (who also wrote The True Believer). Hoffer worked as a stevedore in California and also picked vegetables. He pointed out that after six months of (say?) picking green beans, changing to picking green peas was traumatic. In other words, human beings resist change. We tend to want to fall back into old habits and make excuses for what is really a psychological phenomena.

My life is not what it should be; I'm not happy, I'm not in good health, and change has to come. I can see where chewing a lot would thin the products going into our bodies, making it easier to digest and flushing away the "sludge," given that it's mostly rice, soy, vegetables. Not an easy change to make, however; I have a roaring desire to eat the comfort foods of my youth (chicken fried steak, mashed potatoes and gravy, sliced tomatoes - but vegan versions, with fake meat, soy milk and butter). This later is a step up from omnivore fare but not really there yet.
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