U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Vermont
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-25-2012, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Vermont
5,439 posts, read 14,746,800 times
Reputation: 2629

Advertisements

you might want to compare the efficiency of a oil boiler to efficiency of propane boiler to get true dollar per BTU. they put 80% efficiency for both fuels in that PDF. I don't know what efficiency of a modern oil boiler is, but its 95% for a modern propane boiler. Plus propane do not require any maintenance really. Less maintenance than oil at least.

If you're doing the whole radiant floor heat, one of these 2 in combination with your masonry heater seem to make sense. What happens if you go away in the winter ... going to get a neighbor to load the pellet boiler? You could, I guess, drain all the pipes and leave it cold or winterize with antifreeze. But that is also a lot of work.

I guess if you're paying $4 for propane or $4 for #2, even at 80% efficiency on the oil, you're getting more energy out of oil than 95% efficiency on the propane. Dunno how much the prices end up varying between the two fuels?


my parents just put in radiant in their whole house and are very happy with it. they even put it in the concrete in the basement. I've been thinking that radiant here in concrete polished floors would be real fun and durable and easy to maintain. maybe some day
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-25-2012, 01:42 PM
 
444 posts, read 683,889 times
Reputation: 402
The best option, actually, is to build a passive home: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/26/bu...vermont&st=nyt.
They're more expensive, but really sound amazing. I'm surprised more of them aren't built in the U.S.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-25-2012, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Vermont
5,439 posts, read 14,746,800 times
Reputation: 2629
great article. This is what I want to do essentially.
I wonder how they are made??? Looks like it's made with SIPs???

I don't care a bout LEED certification, but making a home that requires almost nothing to keep warm makes sense looking to the future I think.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-25-2012, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Western views of Mansfield/Camels Hump!
1,941 posts, read 3,228,155 times
Reputation: 1085
I've spoken with several builders about the passive homes...a few in the state doing it...one was going up in Stowe actually, I think the walls were 16" thick if I recall. I would love to go that route as well but every builder I spoke with came back with some high numbers...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-26-2012, 04:50 AM
 
Location: Manassas, VA
1,559 posts, read 3,171,817 times
Reputation: 839
Quote:
Originally Posted by joe moving View Post
you might want to compare the efficiency of a oil boiler to efficiency of propane boiler to get true dollar per BTU. they put 80% efficiency for both fuels in that PDF. I don't know what efficiency of a modern oil boiler is, but its 95% for a modern propane boiler. Plus propane do not require any maintenance really. Less maintenance than oil at least.

If you're doing the whole radiant floor heat, one of these 2 in combination with your masonry heater seem to make sense. What happens if you go away in the winter ... going to get a neighbor to load the pellet boiler? You could, I guess, drain all the pipes and leave it cold or winterize with antifreeze. But that is also a lot of work.
Exactly my thoughts on the matter. What happens if we need to be gone. We have to have something as backup to keep the house warm enough to prevent the pipes from freezing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-26-2012, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Winter Springs, FL
1,789 posts, read 4,057,353 times
Reputation: 925
If the climate experts and USDA are correct (this winter is a good example), we may be heading for warmer and warmer winters. An efficient oil burner may be the most affordable way to go. Our furnace is going to be 40 years old this year. While most of it has been replaced in that time and I'm sure the efficiency is not close to a new oil burner. We used an all time low amount of fuel oil this winter. We just filled it today. The last time it was filled (250 gallon tank) was in November. Our plan is a new furnace in the near future and we had thoughts of geothermal, but I'm not sure I would ever make up the cost of the system in the time we will be here. Our oil company has records of our oil use since we owned the home. In all the years we have owned our home, the amount we have spent in oil does not make a sizable dent in a different system. The only other conversion that could possibly come close in cost would be natural gas. That would be with a discount on installation from the gas company.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-26-2012, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
68,946 posts, read 51,100,582 times
Reputation: 11342
Something else to think about. I re-did my entire house. Gutted out inside, roof, windows, ect. In a way I regret how air tight and newly insulated it is because you can tell how stuffy it gets and stays in Spring and Summer where the a/c is on more often to keep things cool.

This is coming from someone who needs and loves fridgid weather so it might be fine for someone else. But it does get too hot and stuff a lot.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-27-2012, 03:21 AM
 
Location: Manassas, VA
1,559 posts, read 3,171,817 times
Reputation: 839
Yeah, we won't even be using the radiant heat when we are home with the exception of the basement. I get super hot in the house and keep it at 60 in the winter. I generally keep a window open in the bedroom. In the summers here in VA we are out of luck with trying to keep things cool. Our air conditioner can't keep up and during the day it stays in the upper 70s/low 80s (depending on how hot it is outside). It's only at night when the house can finally get into the mid 70s (with the air conditioner still running . It's horrible.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Vermont
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:22 AM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top