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Old 08-13-2012, 08:39 PM
 
438 posts, read 385,457 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrugalYankee View Post
This is why I gave up on tomoatoes. I had vines bursting with green tomatoes and then.....
the leaves started turning grey. Blight.

My choices were to spray with chemicals or leave the land fallow for a few years. We finally are giving it a shot this year after four years of no home grown tomatoes.
Late blight is different from other blights in that it requires a living plant to survive the winter. In most cases that would be a potato. Unless you have potatoes from a blight year you should be OK. I'm just wondering if it would be worth it to apply a fungicide now to help ward off the spores in case they do arrive. If my plants can hold up for a couple more weeks I may be able to harvest most of them. I guess this is a relatively new phenomenon around here, and it's hard to get a good feel on what is likely to happen. The spores can travel many miles in the wind, but require moist, cool conditions to germinate. The nearest outbreaks are downwind from here to the north, but we could still get spores from the south. Late Blight Map | USAblight
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Old 08-14-2012, 07:17 AM
 
Location: Colchester, Vt
1,786 posts, read 2,652,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pauldorell View Post
Late blight is different from other blights in that it requires a living plant to survive the winter. In most cases that would be a potato. Unless you have potatoes from a blight year you should be OK. I'm just wondering if it would be worth it to apply a fungicide now to help ward off the spores in case they do arrive. If my plants can hold up for a couple more weeks I may be able to harvest most of them. I guess this is a relatively new phenomenon around here, and it's hard to get a good feel on what is likely to happen. The spores can travel many miles in the wind, but require moist, cool conditions to germinate. The nearest outbreaks are downwind from here to the north, but we could still get spores from the south. Late Blight Map | USAblight
Our area is one of the areas affected by blight right now. We use a combination of organic sprays (because of the crops we sell) and have not been touched. Our tomatoes (and potatoes)look awesome. It's a shame they will be gone in about a months time. If anyone is interested in the company, they can DM me and I can pass that info on. One of the sprays we have used in the past is compost tea and cooper. Cornell University has a recipe to spray along with the products mentioned. We have used an organic version of their recipe:
1 tablespoon baking soda
2 drops dish-washing liquid or insecticidal soap
1 tablespoon oil. You can use vegetable oil, but horticultural oil will work better
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Old 08-14-2012, 09:36 AM
 
Location: at the end of a dirt road
3,070 posts, read 1,816,946 times
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We've never done potatoes. We burned the blighted tomato plants when this happened a few years ago and so far so good with our plants this year. I'm hoping the spores will be gone since we waited over four years.
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Old 08-14-2012, 10:26 AM
 
438 posts, read 385,457 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 68vette View Post
Our area is one of the areas affected by blight right now. We use a combination of organic sprays (because of the crops we sell) and have not been touched. Our tomatoes (and potatoes)look awesome. It's a shame they will be gone in about a months time. If anyone is interested in the company, they can DM me and I can pass that info on. One of the sprays we have used in the past is compost tea and cooper. Cornell University has a recipe to spray along with the products mentioned. We have used an organic version of their recipe:
1 tablespoon baking soda
2 drops dish-washing liquid or insecticidal soap
1 tablespoon oil. You can use vegetable oil, but horticultural oil will work better
I just sprayed my tomatoes with this:
Concern Copper Soap Fungicide. Still no sign of late blight here.
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Old 08-14-2012, 10:32 AM
 
438 posts, read 385,457 times
Reputation: 335
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrugalYankee View Post
We've never done potatoes. We burned the blighted tomato plants when this happened a few years ago and so far so good with our plants this year. I'm hoping the spores will be gone since we waited over four years.
The spores and late blight fungus die over winter unless the fungus spends the winter in living tissue. There are other kinds of fungus that can survive the winter, but if you get late blight again it will be from spores blown in from somewhere else.
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Old 08-14-2012, 11:22 AM
 
Location: at the end of a dirt road
3,070 posts, read 1,816,946 times
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I don't know what kind of blight we had but I asked a couple of farmer friends of mine what to do and they said to either spray or just not grow tomatoes on that patch for a few years. Maybe if I had ripped out the plants that showed the first signs of it the rest might have survived. Who knows. I didn't realize what it was at first and then I thought I might be able to harvest the tomatoes before the blight took over. As it was I threw in the towel and burned the plants as my farmer friends suggested.
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Old 08-14-2012, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Vermont
1,458 posts, read 2,617,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrugalYankee View Post
Maybe if I had ripped out the plants that showed the first signs of it the rest might have survived..
We have a very suspect looking Mister Stripey who had me worried from the start. Wife wouldn't toss it.
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Old 08-17-2012, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Vermont
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well i just yanked a plant that appears to have late blight, so it's probably only a matter of time.

still we probably got more tomatoes than ever before
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Old 08-17-2012, 01:23 PM
 
438 posts, read 385,457 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quickdraw View Post
well i just yanked a plant that appears to have late blight, so it's probably only a matter of time.

still we probably got more tomatoes than ever before
Yeah, I don't know what's going on with the late blight. It started in July and then just seemed to stop. But conditions have been good for it to spread for the last few days, with the thunderstorms. No sign of blight on my tomatoes, though, so I'm keeping my fingers crossed. In theory, if everyone pulled out the infected plants immediately and put them in trash bags, that could stop its spread.
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Old 08-17-2012, 01:36 PM
 
Location: at the end of a dirt road
3,070 posts, read 1,816,946 times
Reputation: 2155
Looks like we may be getting hit with it. I looked at hubby's plants and don't like the looks of a few leaves one bit.
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