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Old 08-16-2012, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Western views of Mansfield/Camels Hump!
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That looks like a great documentary...it's good to see that kind of progress.
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Old 08-16-2012, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Winter Springs, FL
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We (and people every where) typically think this movement is only occurring in their state or region. This is taking the country by storm. Another great tracking tool of how local farm fresh produce and goods is taking off, is to look at the number of farmers markets. We can look at Vermont and the US numbers. In 1994 Vermont had 24 farmers markets. By 2010, that number increased to 87. In the US, in 1994 there were 1744 farmers markets. 18 years later that number increased to 7864 markets. New York (647 markets) and California (827 markets) lead all states followed by Mass (313 markets). The largest increase in local grown food was the mid-Atlantic with a 15.8% increase. Exciting stuff.
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Old 08-16-2012, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Western views of Mansfield/Camels Hump!
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Being in NYC we've been lucky - the amount of farmers markets we have is outstanding. And every year there seem to be more. The CSA programs have increased substantially as well...one minor negative with the markets down here is that it's hard to really get to know the farmer just because of the quantity of customers they have. Plus a lot of them work with restaurants/etc, so it's not as easy to develop any kind of relationship with them. The farmers from our CSA are more accessible though.
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Old 08-16-2012, 02:39 PM
 
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Originally Posted by 68vette View Post
This is taking the country by storm.
I planted a big vegetable garden this year, larger than previous years of just boring tomatoes. We've been enjoying constant green beens for the past four weeks. I've been giving away cucumbers for months. And my very first cantaloupe is sitting on my kitchen counter. I'm sure everyone will laugh at me, but I thought cantaloupe were grown on trees. Everyone told me I was crazy for trying, they said that cantaloupe will just rot on the vine, but I have 20 doing just fine. The honeydew, not so much. Speaking of fruit growing on trees, we are planning to plant every fruit tree and berry bush imaginable this fall. I was motivated by the crazy rise in food prices, and the fear of where my food comes from now that the gas industry is drilling like crazy in my state.
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Old 08-16-2012, 05:45 PM
 
Location: Western views of Mansfield/Camels Hump!
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Yay for you! That is great....nothing like the feeling of eating things you have grown, especially when other people say you can't do it.
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Old 08-16-2012, 07:41 PM
 
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Originally Posted by 68vette View Post
Hi Steve, We do have very good Farm to table, but every state has great food to offer now (including NJ). This is not just a Vermont thing (it actually started and was perfected in California). This is a good link There are thousands of links on the net to great food in every part of this country. The farmers market in of all places Detroit (Detroit Eastern Market - Detroit Eastern Market), is one of the largest and best in the country. Who would have thought.
Related to another thread, this is something we learned from those darn dirty Europeans.
I'm originally from NJ and when I go back for a visit, I've noticed more and more farmers' markets, especially as you head toward the shore. NJ tomatoes are the best. Something about the soil makes them grow unusually sweet and the turn brightest red/orange. You can also get sweet corn quite easily while here most farmers grow cow corn to feed their herds. The NJ blueberry crops and cranberry bogs are also outstanding though we have a great blueberry farm here in Vermont not far from where we live. My toddler is in heaven when we go there to pick and the farm just smiles when I apologize b/c she puts more in her mouth than in her bucket.
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