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Old 11-25-2007, 02:31 PM
 
34 posts, read 150,178 times
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How much would it cost to build a house, per square foot, in southern VT (the Windsor area)? I realize this is dependant on specifics, but does anyone know a general figure for a basic, well built but not fancy house, per square foot? I would appreciate it! After looking at what we could afford in already built houses, we are thinking it might be best just to find a piece of land and build, probably around 2000 square feet or less. Any thoughts?
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Old 11-25-2007, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Winter Springs, FL
1,789 posts, read 4,056,956 times
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I never lived in the Windsor area, but I did live in Central Vermont which is close. I found that the cost was very close. The way you can save is by doing some of the work yourself if you build(ie tile work, trim, paint, fixtures, ect). I found it was most cost effective to buy an older home that needed some work and to fix it up over time. If you do build, pick a good builder that is known to use quality material(you will have to research this). Some builders use cheap material and give what looks like a good price. You don't want to have to replace things a couple of years down the road.
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Old 11-26-2007, 05:12 AM
 
2,143 posts, read 7,184,536 times
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$80-$100 per square foot. Don't forget to figure in the septic system and well, along with the septic permits.
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Old 11-26-2007, 06:19 AM
 
Location: Western views of Mansfield/Camels Hump!
1,941 posts, read 3,227,812 times
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I was given a range of $150-200 per square foot in the Waterbury area...and this was also for a not-fancy smaller home...I would imagine that Windsor might be more reasonable, but I would still budget at least $125 square foot...construction always ends up being more expensive than you plan for!

I would also agree that it's cheaper to buy something that needs work and make it your own...
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Old 11-26-2007, 07:19 AM
 
34 posts, read 150,178 times
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Thanks! That sounds reasonable. We are afraid of buying a fixer-upper and finding that it needs much more than we anticipated. Also it might be fun to start from scratch. We'll see....
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Old 08-17-2013, 12:52 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
66 posts, read 97,033 times
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[quote=tkln;2088700]I was given a range of $150-200 per square foot in the Waterbury area...and this was also for a not-fancy smaller home...I would imagine that Windsor might be more reasonable, but I would still budget at least $125 square foot...construction always ends up being more expensive than you plan for!

Its so depressing have to pay so much I mean 200 dollars a square foot. I added up based that, just a small house would cost 300,000 based on the square foot price and that does not include things like trim and painting. One can buy a much bigger house or even a new house for 300,000. I live in san franicsco I hear 200 a square foot but maybe these builders are over paid. Do they expect to be paid like lawyers and dentists?
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Old 08-17-2013, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Vermont
5,439 posts, read 14,745,248 times
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I know Huntington Homes starts at around $107/sq ft including foundation pouring but not including: excavation for the foundation, septic, grading, stumping, propane tank, PoCo hookups, well, or LAND or landscaping. Could easily be 200+/sq ft when you include those other items.
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Old 08-18-2013, 04:40 AM
 
Location: Vermont
1,006 posts, read 1,411,235 times
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We built our house with considerable sweat equity 7 years ago. It was our 3rd build. We had a contractor who was fine with giving me projects to save money and speed the process along. I was on the jobsite every day after work cleaning up, moving lumber around, or doing projects. It was a stressful, intense 6 months from start to finish. I would never do it again while still working, but it was rewarding none the less.
Find a house plan you like, and get quotes from a few builders with good references. Plan on a lot of suprises, and budget 10% at least for stuff you never thought of. Do your homework and be prepared for the million, "what do you want to do here?" questions that will pop up. Pick out trim,doors, floors, cabinets etc before you start so as not slow down the process. What kind of heating system? Nail down prices on specifics as early as you can. Be prepared. Our well driller had to go down 500+ feet and our water required an aerator, iron filter, and was a quick $3500 extra. Appliances? Permits? Extras? It will seem like it never ends.
I tell you this to prepare you, not scare you! In this market, it's cheaper to buy an existing house. Our house 7 years later wouldn't sell for what we have in it. I'm still glad we did it. There's nothing like a brand new home exactly the way you want it. If. You're so inclined, you can save a lot doing things yourself. I took 2 weeks vacation, did our hardwood floors and saved $8000. Even just cleaning up and moving lumber around saves.
Good luck!
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Old 08-18-2013, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Western views of Mansfield/Camels Hump!
1,941 posts, read 3,227,812 times
Reputation: 1085
We were THIS close to buying land and building this past spring, but I just couldn't get this nagging feeling out of the pit of my stomach. Land is not cheap and when you throw in all the other variables and unknowns, plus having a not-unlimited budget, it just felt like we were taking a huge chance. We ended up finding a house that fit almost all of our needs at a price we definitely wouldn't have come close to with building. Is it EXACTLY what we wanted? No. Is it close enough? Yes. And with the rising interest rates, I felt more comfortable getting our mortgage now, rather than waiting a year and seeing what the rates are then.

Of course, if we had the funds and the time and found a great lot to build on, things may have been different!
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Old 08-18-2013, 05:57 PM
 
157 posts, read 177,500 times
Reputation: 351
Why not build with alternative materials and yourself?


Video 1


Video 2

Do a search on youtube, or ask me more, but frankly, why not do it yourself with friends?
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