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Old 08-13-2008, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Western views of Mansfield/Camels Hump!
1,305 posts, read 1,870,687 times
Reputation: 568
I read about this last week and was very happy. Just got my iPhone...good to know it'll still work when we move.
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Old 08-13-2008, 12:56 PM
 
102 posts, read 195,558 times
Reputation: 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by arel View Post
Another great post that hits home for me.

I anticipate a lot of homesicknesses for NYC.

When I first visited Brattleboro, I thought it was in the middle of nowhere! I only saw downtown and I thought the town was shapeless (whatever that means). I had all sorts of complaints, mostly petty. The town felt alien. Some people seemed unfriendly and that hurt my feelings. I didn't like all that Victorian architecture. The mountain across the river (Mount Wantastiquet) seemed wierd, although it made a good reference point when I got lost in town. I almost tripped on something sticking out of the sidewalk. Later, the drop near the town commons seemed dangerous; you have to walk down a path on the edge of the hill. The theater (Hooker Dunham or something like that) felt like a theater on a college campus. The Chestnut Hill Reservoir seemed ugly, dangerous and out of place. Retreat Tower seemed scary; I later read that it is believed to be haunted. The Food Coop was too expensive. The road to Keene had a place where a lake came practically up to the road. Etc. Etc. Etc. Etc.

I think all this is just resistance to the new.

But one thing happened that created a link to the city: I stepped in "it". If you have to ask what "it" is, then you probably live in a place where pooper scooper laws are obeyed, or where there are no dogs.
Your post made me chuckle. You are from NYC and got LOST in Brattleboro? It just tickled me to read that ! (Just picking on you, glad you changed your mind !)
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Old 08-13-2008, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Vermont
1,434 posts, read 4,507,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duff in VT View Post
Your post made me chuckle. You are from NYC and got LOST in Brattleboro? It just tickled me to read that ! (Just picking on you, glad you changed your mind !)

Of course I can get lost in Brattleboro. It may be smaller than NYC, but if it is unfamiliar one can still get lost.

BTW, New Yorkers get lost in New York. It is so big that there is always something new to explore, and there are always unfamiliar areas. Even familiar areas can get confusing at times, if you are not there on a regular basis. Yesterday I was in Brooklyn Heights and I had to ask someone where a certain, well-known street was. I am a native Brooklynite, and the person who told me was a foreigner.
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Old 08-14-2008, 11:27 AM
 
Location: hinesburg, vt
1,574 posts, read 3,228,914 times
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Ha, ha, concerning getting lost and needing directions. A few years ago I visited the rubble of what once was a nice neighborhood where I grew up in NYC and on several occasions had people stop and ask for directions for this that and the other. I was amazed that even after an absence of thirty plus years I could recall accurate details. The only thing that remained the same was the layout of the streets, virtually none of the original neighborhood features were there anymore.
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Old 08-14-2008, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Vermont
1,434 posts, read 4,507,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flu189 View Post
Ha, ha, concerning getting lost and needing directions. A few years ago I visited the rubble of what once was a nice neighborhood where I grew up in NYC and on several occasions had people stop and ask for directions for this that and the other. I was amazed that even after an absence of thirty plus years I could recall accurate details. The only thing that remained the same was the layout of the streets, virtually none of the original neighborhood features were there anymore.
What did it feel like to see that?
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Old 08-14-2008, 07:28 PM
 
Location: hinesburg, vt
1,574 posts, read 3,228,914 times
Reputation: 370
Quote:
Originally Posted by arel View Post
What did it feel like to see that?
Actually, quite a bit of sadness and frustration. I guess it would have been different were the neighborhood improved as nothing can ever really stay the same, but the sheer volume of decay, garbage, and the relentless paving over of virtually every sqaure yard of exposed soil where years ago trees grew between the sidewalk and curb and homeowners tended to their small plot gardens and hedges in front of their homes, well you get the picture. I realize there are some very nicely maintained neighborhhods in the city, but unfortunately the new denizens of my old digs have opted for the opposite in aesthetics.
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Old 08-14-2008, 10:12 PM
 
Location: Vermont
1,434 posts, read 4,507,192 times
Reputation: 409
Quote:
Originally Posted by flu189 View Post
Actually, quite a bit of sadness and frustration. I guess it would have been different were the neighborhood improved as nothing can ever really stay the same, but the sheer volume of decay, garbage, and the relentless paving over of virtually every sqaure yard of exposed soil where years ago trees grew between the sidewalk and curb and homeowners tended to their small plot gardens and hedges in front of their homes, well you get the picture. I realize there are some very nicely maintained neighborhhods in the city, but unfortunately the new denizens of my old digs have opted for the opposite in aesthetics.

That is upsetting.
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Old 08-15-2008, 06:24 AM
 
Location: Western views of Mansfield/Camels Hump!
1,305 posts, read 1,870,687 times
Reputation: 568
They actually are finally changing the zoning laws here in Queens - after so many old homes were town down and replaced with huge brick monstrosities that are two or three family homes, owner would completely pave over all the greenery on the property for parking. They're going to make that illegal now. Wish they'd done that years ago.
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Old 08-15-2008, 01:20 PM
 
19 posts, read 43,786 times
Reputation: 15
My dream is to live in Woodstock-- in the town. And WALK to the coffee shop, one of the two bookstores, etc. And DRIVE if I want to go to the Norwich market, etc.

Sure, it is a little touristy, but in the most civilized, historical way. Billings farm is a national treasure. The farmers market in Woodstock on Wednesdays is gorgeous. The On The Edge farm up the road makes the best bacon I've ever tasted.

Mark my vote for Woodstock.

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Last edited by vter; 08-15-2008 at 03:08 PM..
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Old 08-18-2008, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Vermont
1,457 posts, read 2,549,913 times
Reputation: 721
Quote:
Originally Posted by littlebitcountry View Post
My dream is to live in Woodstock-- in the town. And WALK to the coffee shop, one of the two bookstores, etc. And DRIVE if I want to go to the Norwich market, etc.

Sure, it is a little touristy, but in the most civilized, historical way. Billings farm is a national treasure. The farmers market in Woodstock on Wednesdays is gorgeous. The On The Edge farm up the road makes the best bacon I've ever tasted.

Mark my vote for Woodstock.

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I love my cabin and property. I'll walk around and can't believe I live here.
But I'm always thinking ahead, and my next move will be to a home that is within a short distance to a functional town with acccess to good food, bread (read Red Hen bread) and a tavern. Preferably with a bike path. I really enjoy sitting in a tavern and having a few beers with the locals. I'm not crazy about getting in a car afterward though, so I rarely go anymore. The reasons for not drinking and driving are obvious, but one additional aspect would change the way I live here. Get a DUI and you're not getting into Canada for at least 7 years. To me, the proximity to Montreal is one of the biggest bonuses of living in Burlington.
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