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Old 02-09-2015, 02:19 AM
 
4 posts, read 5,549 times
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I recommend Bennington County or Rutland County (they are protected by the mountains from some of the really large storms). Being from out-of-state, Southern Vermont is a lot more welcoming (not to say that Northern Vermont isn't though, it's relative). Honestly though, if you're hoping to find a warmish spot in Vermont you're sadly mistaking- The warmest part of Vermont is in Massachusetts.
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Old 02-19-2015, 11:46 AM
 
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Thank you very much everyone for taking the time to respond and for your very helpful insights. I completely agree that there are no "warm" places in VT during winter, however, we certainly didn't want to inadvertently end up in the coldest place in the state either. We both like winter very much and love to snowboard, will certainly look into snowshoeing too (thanks for the tip!). We look forward to the move. The truth is that there is so much that VT has to offer, tolerating harsh winters is a minor price to pay for living in the state. Thanks again for your help!
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Old 02-25-2015, 05:57 PM
 
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Nonnative - I've recently started researching Rutland County. You said they seem to miss the big storms, do you happen to know how they fared when that hurricane went through a couple years ago? Even though they miss the big storms, they still get plenty of snow, right?
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Old 02-25-2015, 06:11 PM
 
Location: IN
20,849 posts, read 35,958,846 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by happeemommee View Post
Nonnative - I've recently started researching Rutland County. You said they seem to miss the big storms, do you happen to know how they fared when that hurricane went through a couple years ago? Even though they miss the big storms, they still get plenty of snow, right?
They are further inland, a bit more protected from the larger storms. They get less snowfall from any Nor' Easter events during the Winter compared to areas off to the southeast in southern New England up to the Maine coast. Rutland still gets quite cold, though. Not as cold as northern Vermont or the NEK, though.
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Old 02-24-2016, 06:42 PM
 
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In case anyone is thinking of moving to Vermont and are concerned about winter temperatures, we ended up moving here in December 2015 from Ohio. It's true that this has been a very mild winter, but even the coldest days (reaching a bit below zero Fahrenheit) were a lot more tolerable than the supposedly much warmer temperatures I have previously experienced in New York City and Ohio. It's a lot less windy, so it doesn't feel as cold. We absolutely love it!
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Old 02-25-2016, 06:18 AM
 
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Yeah, some days feel really nice. I personally enjoy the colder days with no wind and with sun than the warmer, windy days. A couple weeks ago that day that started at -20 and climbed up to about +5, even when it was still sub zero in the afternoon after the sun was out felt really great!
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Old 02-25-2016, 06:35 AM
 
809 posts, read 678,128 times
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Don't live in a valley or a hollow, and unless the house is well draft-proofed, don't live on a hilltop or the windward side of a slope. If you have to live on the latter, have lots of evergreens to windward to mitigate the effect of the wind.

Living in a depression will have you either surrounded by the coldest air on still days and nights or subject to the winds that might characteristically be channeled down the valley.

Expect no more than a week of sub-zero temps. (Three weeks used to be normal.)

During those days, snowshoe or cross-country ski. Eighteen calories a minute, and you'll probably be perspiring by the time you're done!
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Old 03-04-2016, 07:51 PM
 
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I live in southeastern Vermont, I think it is the warmest part of the state. Internet connectivity can be an issue, but I've managed to find it without too much trouble in the homes where I've lived. I also work from home, so internet access has been a must. Maybe I should sell you my 5 acres ;-) -- new super eco-friendly home, barn, detached heated office, 1 mile from town with southern exposure, DSL and cable. We are moving back to the west coast this summer.
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Old 04-10-2016, 07:36 AM
BMI
 
Location: Ontario
7,265 posts, read 4,504,148 times
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Southeastern Vermont is the "warmest" ,
VT is a pretty small state....so not a big range in climate....with NEK being the coldest.


Here is a comparison between Vernon in SE and Burlington in NW....


VERNON, VT.......BURLINGTON, VT


33/13.....JAN.......27/10
37/14.....FEB.......31/13
46/25.....MAR......40/22
59/34.....APR.......55/35
71/45.....MAY.......67/45
79/55.....JUN........76/55
84/60.....JUL........81/60
83/58.....AUG.......79/59
75/49.....SEP........70/51
62/38.....OCT.......57/39
50/30.....NOV.......46/31
38/19.....DEC.......33/19


Vernon climate is a slightly cooler version of Amherst, MA


Burlington climate is a slightly warmer version of Montreal, Quebec.


Higher elevation areas will have cooler highs, about 3 degrees winter, 5 degrees summer.
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Old 04-10-2016, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Vermont
10,308 posts, read 11,225,495 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arctichomesteader View Post
The Vernon area is probably one of the warmest in VT. There are even black gum trees in some swamps there, a species that is more common further south. But it's colder than Ohio.
Yeah, but with Vermont Yankee closing that's going to change, right?

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