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Old 02-02-2015, 11:31 AM
 
5 posts, read 7,003 times
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Hi everyone,

We are looking into relocating to Vermont. We are in our early 40's, very secular, don't have and don't want to have kids, and are both computer programmers and work full time. We can easily convert our current jobs to working from home, so we don't need to change jobs or look for new jobs because of this move. We want to have our own homestead and a large parcel of land to live a simple and quite life, re-connect with nature, reduce our negative environmental impact and contribute to the community we live in. All our research pointed to Vermont, and our two visits (4-5 days each, in October and early December) made us more confident that this is the place for us. We currently live in Cleveland which is not exactly tropical, and we actually like the weather here. However, Vermont seems to be significantly colder. I am hoping that there are areas in VT where winter is a bit milder. Since we don't have any job- or kid-related restrictions, I wanted to tap your collective wisdom and experience and ask for suggestions on where in Vermont we can find milder winters and still have some hills/mountains and the breathtaking natural beauty that we love so much in VT. Many thanks in advance for your suggestions and insights. We so much look forward to this move!

Sami
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Old 02-02-2015, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Vermont
3,329 posts, read 8,782,460 times
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The Champlain Valley is the warmest part of VT (northern anyway). Growing season is a couple weeks longer. But its still darn cold in the winter~
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Old 02-02-2015, 12:17 PM
 
809 posts, read 676,989 times
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We refer to Brattleboro as being in "the banana belt," but it's not really that much warmer than anyplace else. I believe the whole state sits on the Laurentian Shield, which practically guarantees it's going to have cold winters.

If you want to stay warm in Vermont, get either cross-country skis or snowshoes. After an hour or two outside, it will feel like heaven to come into your 54-degree house. Plus, they are 18-calorie-a-minute exercisers, so you'll stay fit. And if you snowshoe, you will have the chance to view scenery that nobody else is looking at.

When you look for land or a place to live, avoid the valleys and hollows, since the cold air settles in and stays there a long time. A house sited facing slightly southwest, free of shade, will make sunny winter days seem to or actually be less frigid. Of course, you'll miss the shade in the summer, and when it gets up to 85, don't expect that sitting around is going to cool you off.
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Old 02-02-2015, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Western views of Mansfield/Camels Hump!
1,942 posts, read 3,235,693 times
Reputation: 1085
One thing to keep in mind if you are going to work from home and you want a large parcel of land is internet connectivity (I'm going to assume you'll need it). Large parcels of land will more likely be in rural areas, which may, or may not, have good internet options.
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Old 02-02-2015, 03:21 PM
 
Location: The Woods
16,946 posts, read 22,257,781 times
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The Vernon area is probably one of the warmest in VT. There are even black gum trees in some swamps there, a species that is more common further south. But it's colder than Ohio.
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Old 02-02-2015, 05:13 PM
 
221 posts, read 266,016 times
Reputation: 375
Champlain valley has its own lil weather system being in the valley and shielded by the mountains most times it is warmer than other areas, but every once in a while it can actually be colder. Same with snow most times doesn't get as much sometimes gets more. I'm not really all that familiar with the other places mentioned here but out of the ones I do know I would agree with vter. But doesn't stop it from being sub zero this week!
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Old 02-03-2015, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
17,851 posts, read 54,134,324 times
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You want to move to Vermont from Ohio and find a warm spot, and you work in programming when IBM is trying to downsize and leave Vermont, providing an overabundance of workers in that field with no jobs.

I trust you have a plan B?
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Old 02-03-2015, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Vermont
3,329 posts, read 8,782,460 times
Reputation: 1996
Harry-you must have missed where they said they will bring their jobs with them (telecommute) . Also, IBM is in the hardware business, not software. At least at the Essex plant. But yes, if they pull out it would be bad for the local economy but that's a different thread for a different day. Now if Dealer, MyWebGrocer or GE Healthcare were to pull out...that would be bad for the local software engineer job market.
OP-another poster brought up a good point-if you are looking for a rural property make sure it will have access to the internet speeds you need to do your jobs. Luckily where I live we have cable internet but some friends down the road do not have access to cable internet and have DSL...they complain that it is really slow.
In northern Vermont, the Champlain Valley will give you the longest growing season. The area also has great fertile farm land. The area can also be very expensive depending on the towns you are interested in.
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Last edited by vter; 02-03-2015 at 10:46 AM..
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Old 02-03-2015, 07:13 PM
 
Location: USA (North Springfield, Vermont)
219 posts, read 409,935 times
Reputation: 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by sami- View Post
Hi everyone,

We are looking into relocating to Vermont. We are in our early 40's, very secular, don't have and don't want to have kids, and are both computer programmers and work full time. We can easily convert our current jobs to working from home, so we don't need to change jobs or look for new jobs because of this move. We want to have our own homestead and a large parcel of land to live a simple and quite life, re-connect with nature, reduce our negative environmental impact and contribute to the community we live in. All our research pointed to Vermont, and our two visits (4-5 days each, in October and early December) made us more confident that this is the place for us. We currently live in Cleveland which is not exactly tropical, and we actually like the weather here. However, Vermont seems to be significantly colder. I am hoping that there are areas in VT where winter is a bit milder. Since we don't have any job- or kid-related restrictions, I wanted to tap your collective wisdom and experience and ask for suggestions on where in Vermont we can find milder winters and still have some hills/mountains and the breathtaking natural beauty that we love so much in VT. Many thanks in advance for your suggestions and insights. We so much look forward to this move!

Sami
Downtown Springfield. Almost nothing beats that area, good-weather-wise.
It normally gets far less snow than a Great Lakes city.

2011 was an unusually snowy winter, thus even 8.5 inches is on the high side per-single-snow-day.
(2011 had a lot of snow days with 13 inches per snow day) (January 12, January 18 and February 25)

(February 2, 2011 had 10 inches) (some snow then thunder sleet on February 5, 2011)

Keep in mind that 2011 was an unusually-high-precipitation year.

I found Burrrlington to be one of the coldest places! At least in 2014, where it failed to get above zero (or much more than 1 degree) during daytime!

(Even though that was far below average for even northern Vermont!)

Even when Burlington's supposed to be the most mild of northern Vermont.
Looks like possibly the best jobs, likely followed by Rutland.

Last edited by RJARRRPCGP; 02-03-2015 at 07:28 PM..
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Old 02-04-2015, 01:55 PM
 
Location: Aiken, SC
35 posts, read 33,828 times
Reputation: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by sami- View Post
Hi everyone,

....... We are in our early 40's, very secular, don't have and don't want to have kids,.....

Sami
I think that you are both a perfect match for Vermont, the least religious state in the country. And, there are no
warm areas in Vermont, except in July and August. I live in the Champlain Valley too, and it was
-18 degrees yesterday morning. Not uncommon. Sometimes even lower.
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