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Old 02-12-2017, 07:43 PM
 
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Hmm....well living half the year in Vermont and half the year just on the Georgia line I have wondered why the radical difference in the amount of church going myself. I think some of it is just a cultural difference. Southern folk tend to be joiners of things. They have a million committees and a million sport teams endless events and going to church is just one of those type of things. Your Daddy was a bulldog fan and a baptist and so was your grandad. You have family pride in that, you support that, you root for your team whether it is football or church. It is just what they do down here. In Vermont it's more of... yeah do whatever you want but leave me out of it.....
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Old 02-12-2017, 10:09 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
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Originally Posted by squarpeg View Post
Hmm....well living half the year in Vermont and half the year just on the Georgia line I have wondered why the radical difference in the amount of church going myself. I think some of it is just a cultural difference. Southern folk tend to be joiners of things. They have a million committees and a million sport teams endless events and going to church is just one of those type of things. Your Daddy was a bulldog fan and a baptist and so was your grandad. You have family pride in that, you support that, you root for your team whether it is football or church. It is just what they do down here. In Vermont it's more of... yeah do whatever you want but leave me out of it.....
I don't know. Vermont people will help each other out. They don't even need a committee, they just do it. When one of those disastrous floods happens, everyone helps, everyone pulls together. They are an amazing breed of people.

Also, travel is difficult when you live in a small mountain town, especially in winter. So it would be hard to get to all these meetings and events. My Vermont family got together for family reunions. They went to church but they didn't make a big deal out of it. There were church picnics and probably church suppers. Do they make radio and tv shows out of it? Probably not. Religion is a personal thing. I think it must only be in the south that they drag religion to the forefront and make it a topic of conversation.

In Vermont it's more of... yeah do whatever you want but leave me out of it....

Yeh, that's how I am and that's how my Vermont family was too.
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Old 02-16-2017, 11:43 AM
 
Location: The Woods
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There's a somewhat famous quote from a Reverend Nathan perkins about VT's founding father, Ethan Allen, that always gives me a bit of a chuckle when I read it:

"Arrived at Onion River falls and passed by Ethan Allyn's grave. An awful infidel, one of [the] wickedest Men [that] ever walked this guilty globe. I stopped and looked at his grave with a pious horror."

Ethan Allen was known for his support of reason and science and his dislike for organized religion.
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Old 02-18-2017, 05:15 PM
 
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I have lived here fourteen years and have yet to be asked about religion from someone I didn't know pretty well and of them none cared that I had no opinion or affiliation. People share or they don't. That is what matters.
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Old 02-19-2017, 07:52 AM
 
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For the most part, we leave each other alone. We don't care. There is no pressure to join any religion. You come if you want to or not. Community is helping each other and there is no need for that to happen in a church. As long as you don't hurt a person physically or mentally (cult), you are fine to be part of the community. That being said, this freedom of religion can cause cults and has been proven in the past that we have had our share.

Living in a rural area helps as well as being in a least populated state.

There is something to be said about the original founders that still has roots in this part of the country. They were "religious" but for the most part, they came to the new country seeking resources and money through a corporation. Not for religious freedom that has been taught to children since the beginning.

That being said, if you skip over to upper NY, you will find a different attitude. Vermont has the attitude that we are all in this together, as long as you don't force it on someone. Then you will be shut down immediately because we realize the dangers of religious fanaticism.
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Old 02-19-2017, 06:48 PM
 
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I haven't posted here for quite a long time, but was interested in this thread. Vermont is an unusual state because of its history. As arctichomesteader said, this used to be a theocracy. Everyone had to support the church financially whether they belonged to it or not. Like New Hampshire and Maine, it remained fairly conservative until recently. It seems to me that demographic changes began here in the 1960's and 1970's, when affluent, well-educated people began to move here, primarily from elsewhere in the Northeast. Well-educated Northeasterners are ideologically similar to Western Europeans, who generally don't take religion seriously. If there were a God, why, for example, would he have allowed Adolf Hitler to exist? Much of the U.S. is still living in the 19th century, because there have never been large armies here massacring millions of people, and stupid religious ideas don't get challenged much. It is these well-educated people who currently define the population in Vermont, but there are still many Vermonters who have lived here for generations and are quite conservative if you get to know them. There are, for example, large pockets of Trump supporters, but for the most part they are poor and uneducated and play little role in defining the state's identity. Some of them have more in common with Appalachian coal miners than they do with Bernie Sanders or Howard Dean. The nice thing is that it's such a small, rural state that people are more inclined to get along than in more populous states even when they have ideological differences.
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Old 02-19-2017, 09:10 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
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Originally Posted by pauldorell View Post
I haven't posted here for quite a long time, but was interested in this thread. Vermont is an unusual state because of its history. As arctichomesteader said, this used to be a theocracy. Everyone had to support the church financially whether they belonged to it or not. Like New Hampshire and Maine, it remained fairly conservative until recently. It seems to me that demographic changes began here in the 1960's and 1970's, when affluent, well-educated people began to move here, primarily from elsewhere in the Northeast. Well-educated Northeasterners are ideologically similar to Western Europeans, who generally don't take religion seriously. If there were a God, why, for example, would he have allowed Adolf Hitler to exist? Much of the U.S. is still living in the 19th century, because there have never been large armies here massacring millions of people, and stupid religious ideas don't get challenged much. It is these well-educated people who currently define the population in Vermont, but there are still many Vermonters who have lived here for generations and are quite conservative if you get to know them. There are, for example, large pockets of Trump supporters, but for the most part they are poor and uneducated and play little role in defining the state's identity. Some of them have more in common with Appalachian coal miners than they do with Bernie Sanders or Howard Dean. The nice thing is that it's such a small, rural state that people are more inclined to get along than in more populous states even when they have ideological differences.
I agree with much of what you have said. You may be interested i this book that talks about the "four different Americas", and their historical roots. It explains the vast cultural divide that we have today, as well as the extreme political divisiveness https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/32081.Albion_s_Seed

Last edited by sheena12; 02-19-2017 at 09:19 PM..
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Old 02-19-2017, 11:29 PM
 
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Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
I agree with much of what you have said. You may be interested i this book that talks about the "four different Americas", and their historical roots. It explains the vast cultural divide that we have today, as well as the extreme political divisiveness https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/32081.Albion_s_Seed
Yes, the book sounds accurate. Although Puritanism has mostly died out, it defined New England's identity and still affects the culture. I was born in England and have lived in the North, South, East, Midwest and West of the U.S. and feel most comfortable in Vermont. There are more French Canadians here than there used to be, but the state hasn't been as affected by Irish-Catholic immigrants as Massachusetts. I often wonder whether Lincoln had the right idea when he decided to preserve the Union.
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Old 02-24-2017, 04:57 PM
 
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I don't know if I agree with the last three statements. We say our prayers, give thanks but it's hard to live here. Hard enough for people to know who is helpful and who isn't. You can preach all you want but if you can't help haul a calf out of a flooded creek, handle a chain saw or walk a mile or two in an ice storm to ease a family's despair you aren't any kind of leader. If you can only offer a prayer but could do much more you should best be quiet.
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Old 02-27-2017, 07:45 AM
 
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John, I"ve noticed you're in Greenbelt. I am too.
P.
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