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Old 04-09-2009, 12:16 PM
 
1,135 posts, read 2,053,850 times
Reputation: 1486

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Below is part of a press release I received at work this week. It shows that Vermont isn't a good place to retire--- unless you have lots of money.

New AARP Study Establishes Basic Needs Affordability Threshold
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The basic costs of living for older Vermonters far exceed the poverty levels set by the federal government – levels often used to determine eligibility for public assistance programs.* A new study released by AARP Vermont today details the costs for elders to meet the basic needs of living here, and establishes an affordability baseline called the Elder Economic Security Standard (EESS).* Similar to the process of setting a livable wage calculation for Vermont workers, this data highlights the heavy economic burden on older residents (retired residents over age 65), many of whom live on very modest fixed incomes. It factors in the costs of housing, food, transportation, health care, and a host of miscellaneous expenses such as furniture, clothing, telephone and household supplies, etc.*
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The study is being released today as attention focuses on Vermont’s affordability and poverty problems at the 2009 Governor’s Summit on Pathways to Economic Stability.* The summit is taking place in the Vermont Statehouse.
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“This standard provides a baseline for policymakers, state agencies and government officials as they look at programs that support this population,” said Greg Marchildon, AARP state director.* “The most glaring finding here is the huge gap between the Vermont EESS and the federal poverty level used to determine eligibility for a host of state and federal assistance programs.* The current poverty levels are clearly outdated and do not reflect the reality of today’s cost of living.”
*
For example, to meet their basic needs, a couple over age 65 with a mortgage needs nearly triple the $13,014 poverty level as established by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. A couple without a mortgage still needs $28,505 a year to meet their basic needs – more than twice the federal poverty level – according to the EESS research.* The EESS for an individual (without a mortgage) is $21,058 – the highest of any state for which similar data is available.

For a copy of the report and more comparative data, go to AARP Online Community: AARPVT - My Journals & Blogs or contact Dave Reville at AARP Vermont at 802-951-1303 or dreville@aarp.org.

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Old 04-09-2009, 12:57 PM
 
894 posts, read 1,289,471 times
Reputation: 259
VT is downright mean to old people. Seniors in VT get taxed on all sorts of things that most states exempt. If you are going to have a high tax state you should at least cut a break for folks who are done working.
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Old 04-09-2009, 04:52 PM
 
6,764 posts, read 19,785,491 times
Reputation: 4688
Considering everyone is older and still working (I swear it looks like every store/library/shop is serviced by 60 and older workers) that is not surprising.

I know I am not retiring here. We already said once our son finishes school we are out of here (if not sooner).
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Old 04-09-2009, 05:27 PM
 
47 posts, read 96,970 times
Reputation: 34
#1 tax state, so it is well known.
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Old 04-10-2009, 08:32 AM
 
Location: hinesburg, vt
1,574 posts, read 4,424,893 times
Reputation: 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by mustmove View Post
VT is downright mean to old people. Seniors in VT get taxed on all sorts of things that most states exempt. If you are going to have a high tax state you should at least cut a break for folks who are done working.
Come on! Old people must pay more for the collective good of the state and then their estate must be liquidated to the people. Seniors are a drain on the system, hence, Vermont insures that they will continue to pay. Also, all those old folks 60 and over are the ones responsible for global warming, nukes, Interstate Highways, and a host of other terrible innovations. Needless to say my wife and I will not be growing old in Vermont.
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