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Old 12-04-2009, 01:28 PM
 
163 posts, read 152,672 times
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OK,
I note that most questions here are about I'm moving hither and yon and want to know this or that.

My question is:

We just read a story about sugar bush and maple trees in reading. (I'm an elementary teacher)

The children want to know about how much sap you get from a tree and how many gallons of sap it takes to make a gallon of syrup.

Also, how long would it take for that to boil down?


I hopw someone can answer our questions over the weekend so we'll have the answers on Monday.

THANKS!
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Old 12-04-2009, 01:35 PM
 
Location: over here
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I am sure you'll get lots of answers...

the amount of sap depends on the weather. You need cold nights and warm days to make the "sap run". Which is usually just a steady drip.

It takes about 40 gallons of sap to make a gallon of syrup. Since sap is made mostly water, this creates a lot of steam when it is boiled. The sap looks like water when dripping out and will brown as it cools.
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Old 12-04-2009, 01:42 PM
 
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Is the sap sweet coming from the tree? or does it have a "different" taste?
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Old 12-04-2009, 01:46 PM
 
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tastes like maple syrup watered down about 40:1
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Old 12-04-2009, 02:41 PM
 
Location: over here
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Quote:
Originally Posted by plowman View Post
Is the sap sweet coming from the tree? or does it have a "different" taste?
Tastes like sugar water.
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Old 12-05-2009, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
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The problem is elementary, Watson. I'm sure you can find all sorts of resources on the net to answer the questions. A small tree might support one tap. A large tree could have more, as many as three or four, without stealing too much and disrupting the growth.

One favorite activity of teachers in Vermont is a field trip of third graders to a sugaring operation. All the kids get to pile into a bus, trundle off and go into a hot and steamy sugarhouse, then go outside where they get treated to sugar on snow (a really thick form of syrup that forms a melted plastic-like paste). The teachers then watch as all the kids get a sugar buzz and throw up all over the place before the bus ride back to school. It is one of the highlights of a teacher's year.
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Old 12-06-2009, 08:08 PM
 
Location: On the west side of the Tetons
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Like someone already said, it takes 40 gallons of sap for 1 gallon of syrup. On average, a mature tree (anywhere from 40 to 200 years old) gives about 10 gallons of sap per year. So, it will take 4 trees to make a gallon of syrup.
Sap is 2% sugar and weighs 8.35lbs/gallon. Syrup is 66% sugar and weighs about 11lbs/gallon.
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Old 12-07-2009, 04:41 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post

One favorite activity of teachers in Vermont is a field trip of third graders to a sugaring operation. All the kids get to pile into a bus, trundle off and go into a hot and steamy sugarhouse, then go outside where they get treated to sugar on snow (a really thick form of syrup that forms a melted plastic-like paste). The teachers then watch as all the kids get a sugar buzz and throw up all over the place before the bus ride back to school. It is one of the highlights of a teacher's year.
How exciting! We have that problem just going to the local dinosaur dig or over to the Pipestone quarry. Only our kids get hot and steamy on the bus, get filled up on hotdogs and hamburgers we grill at the park, then run around until their in a frenzy and kutz up their dinner all over the place but they're right as rain in time for supper.

I recall this happening once when we went to Pipestone, MN and the bus driver and all the kids deserted me while I cleaned the third grader up and took the bus to the car wash across the street from McDonald's where we had just eaten our noon dinner. I hosed the thing out and loaded them all up again. I wanted to hose the kid too. Just a half hour before while I was passing out the fries and burgers at McD he said, "Give me the biggest burger! " then "I want the one which the most fries! Oh which one has the most fries?"

Needless to say, I had him clear through the eighth grade and the other kids never let him forget it. Anytime we ate together they'd holler, "Hey Matt, do you want the biggest piece?"
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Old 12-07-2009, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Vermont
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
The problem is elementary, Watson. I'm sure you can find all sorts of resources on the net to answer the questions. A small tree might support one tap. A large tree could have more, as many as three or four, without stealing too much and disrupting the growth.

One favorite activity of teachers in Vermont is a field trip of third graders to a sugaring operation. All the kids get to pile into a bus, trundle off and go into a hot and steamy sugarhouse, then go outside where they get treated to sugar on snow (a really thick form of syrup that forms a melted plastic-like paste). The teachers then watch as all the kids get a sugar buzz and throw up all over the place before the bus ride back to school. It is one of the highlights of a teacher's year.
And, strange as it seems, the traditional accompaniment to sugar on snow is a pickle.
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Old 12-08-2009, 08:49 AM
 
Location: over here
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Originally Posted by jackmccullough View Post
And, strange as it seems, the traditional accompaniment to sugar on snow is a pickle.
Sweet and sour...one compliments the other.
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