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Old 02-13-2013, 09:34 PM
 
56,274 posts, read 80,465,056 times
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I'm shocked that no one has suggested Charlottesville. While it may not be as diverse as the OP wants, it is a college town with enough diversity and is more "liberal" than many other parts of VA. US2010
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Old 02-14-2013, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Portland Oregon via Hawaii
345 posts, read 580,312 times
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I actually did look at Charlottesville, I saw a few companies in my field competing for employees there.
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Old 02-14-2013, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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Although Charlottesville has a high percentage of non-Whites, I'm not sure it is the best place for the good kind of ethnic diversity: where people of different backgrounds and racial origins mix freely and are friends with and marry each other. There is a big divide between the local residents who are primarily White and Black, and UVA people. Among UVA people, the non-Whites are mostly international students and scholars on temporary non-immigrant visas, and therefore have no intention (or more accurately, no legal means) of staying in Charlottesville for a long time and establishing roots. Many of them don't even speak English and prefer to cluster among their "own kind". NoVA might be a better place for ethnic diversity.
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Old 02-14-2013, 11:14 AM
 
1,210 posts, read 2,199,962 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alikair View Post
I grew up in Hawaii and find ethnic diversity a good thing.

Would like to get suggestions for cities in VA that have a nice MIX of people (not segregated)
I have read a few post on this forum about northern Va, very interesting until I got to the parts were they mentioned how unfriendly people are near the DC boarder and how incredibly expensive it is to live there.

SO, what med - large cities in VA have a normal cost of living (compared to wages) and a good mix of folks.
Spanish/Asian preferred?

PS, the only reason I picked Virginia is the climate is so much better then other states I have on my radar like Austin, Arizona, Florida.

And yes, California is the better choice for weather and diversity, just don't know if i could live in that nutty place.

All suggestions are very welcome, I love doing research on places to live.
I'm hopping to move out of Oregon one day soon. (I don't fit in here)
My wife is from Hawaii (born and raised) and we moved from Honolulu to Virginia Beach 3 years ago and like it. We are in an interracial marriage (she is asian/hispanic/polynesian) and nobody even gives us a second glance around here. There is a large Filipino and small Puerto Rican population due to the Navy presence as well as a moderate hispanic presence in general such that you wouldn't stick out in the least. It is also very middle class, not a lot of super-rich or super-poor and most everyone lives in the same neighborhoods as everyone else.

The area gets a little crazy in the summer with all of the tourists coming to the resort area but there are enough low-key beaches around that you can mostly avoid it. The hard thing around here is just finding a good paying job unless you are government/military/DOD contractor. Housing is slightly above the national average and private sector wages are slightly below... but if you are in the right fields you can do very well around here. I will add this though... It is flat here, it is suburban here, and it is relatively car-first in the way things are set up. So if you are looking for dramatic scenery, urban, and walkable this might not be the best area for you. But then again, if you are leaving Oregon and left Hawaii then maybe you want something different so maybe it is for you.

It is really hard to say where you would fit in without knowing you, being from Hawaii I am surprised you didn't like Oregon... seems like most of the expats we knew either went there, seattle, vegas, or california.

If you want to really see how "diverse" certain places are I suggest using this. People's opinions are nice, but data is always better. THis shows you not just ethnic/racial diversity but also educational, income, median home value etc...

Mapping America ? Census Bureau 2005-9 American Community Survey - NYTimes.com
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Old 02-14-2013, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Portland Oregon via Hawaii
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UHgrad, thanks for the reply. I like Oregon, i just don't think Oregon likes me. I had no problems making friends in Hawaii.
I've been in Oregon since 2005 and have no real friends. I don't see that changing either. you need to be white or Mexican or black. I'm not. In Hawaii, I was a Haoli just like the other white guys. here, they are nice and all, but forget about getting close enough to become buddies. I guess thats probably a united states thing, but it came as a shock to me. People here feel cold and distant. I read its called the Oregon freeze. Who knows.
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Old 02-14-2013, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Portland Oregon via Hawaii
345 posts, read 580,312 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by usuario View Post
Although Charlottesville has a high percentage of non-Whites, I'm not sure it is the best place for the good kind of ethnic diversity: where people of different backgrounds and racial origins mix freely and are friends with and marry each other. There is a big divide between the local residents who are primarily White and Black, and UVA people. Among UVA people, the non-Whites are mostly international students and scholars on temporary non-immigrant visas, and therefore have no intention (or more accurately, no legal means) of staying in Charlottesville for a long time and establishing roots. Many of them don't even speak English and prefer to cluster among their "own kind". NoVA might be a better place for ethnic diversity.
I hear you. but does a place like that exist?
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Old 02-14-2013, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Danville, VA - 3rd Capital of the Confederacy!
203 posts, read 339,767 times
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Cool Learn How to Create Your Own "Ethnic Diversity" Wherever You Live!

Quote:
Originally Posted by usuario View Post
... Charlottesville has a ... big divide between the local residents who are primarily White and Black, and UVA people. Among UVA people, the non-Whites are mostly international students and scholars on temporary non-immigrant visas ... [who] ... don't even speak English and prefer to cluster among their "own kind". NoVA might be a better place for ethnic diversity.
NoVA is probably one of the most successful "melting pots" in the United States. Most of us here in NoVA had gotten far beyond that "racism" and "prejudice" bullsh*t at least half a century ago.

Back then, I was just another white kid growing up in suburban Arlington VA, but one day in August of 1963 I rode my bicycle across the river into Washington DC, and stood in a mostly black crowd of about 200,000 people, and with my own eyes and ears I saw and heard Martin Luther King say:

"I have a dream, that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. I have a dream today!"

My school had been the first school in Virginia to be integrated, in compliance with the Supreme Court Decision in Brown v. Board of Education. (Look it up if you don't know what it was about.)

On that first day of compliance, in February 1958, the National Guard was all around our school to keep the peace and intimidate us all. And the soldiers stood around ominously all day with big assault rifles in their hands, looking and acting as if they might shoot a bunch of us kids (or stab us all with their bayonets) at any moment if we dared to misbehave.

But nothing happened. And that morning about a dozen black kids began attending a school of about 1200 white kids. And that afternoon they went home. And the same thing happened the next day ... and the next ... and so on.

The National Guard soldiers finally left our school in about a week, and nothing had still happened. But by that time, I had acquired several new black friends about my age.

So naturally by 1963, Dr. King's dream sounded like a damned good idea that made sense to me.

Now I have friends of all colors from all over the world. We're all just people, after all. And at this point, about half a century later, I can personally confirm that in most of Northern Virginia, Dr. King's dream has been realized on the street for quite some time now.

That same reality can exist in YOUR city, or town, or neighborhood. You can help it happen.

"Racism" (or in the more generic sense, "ethnocentrism") is based primarily on ignorance and fear.

If you're standing at spot X, and everybody around you is more or less just like you, things are familiar and "normal" -- to you, and you're more or less comfortable with life.

But then if somebody who happens to be "different" moves in across the street from you, or begins working where you work and gets assigned a desk right next to yours ...

... and if you're unfamiliar with people who are "different" in that particular way ...

... you might initially be a little uncomfortable; or maybe even a little afraid of that "other" person.

That doesn't mean that you're a "racist" or a "bigot" or "prejudiced."

Your fears are just based on your lack of knowledge of the "unknown."

BUT Knowledge is Power ... and Power defeats Fear!

And you can increase your comfort level (and that "other" person's comfort level as well) almost immediately. Just start by smiling and saying "hello." And that's all there is to it.

That's not just "southern hospitality" -- it's mentally healthy interpersonal communication.

Just start a conversation, beginning with whatever you can think of that you might have in common, even if you're only talking about the weather. Later you can talk about "differences" as you and your "new friend" get to know each other a little better.

You can always learn something new from each and every new person you meet.

Make it a habit, and "diversity" soon becomes a way of life for you, no matter where you live.

Increase the peace,
Dan
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Old 02-14-2013, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Danville, VA - 3rd Capital of the Confederacy!
203 posts, read 339,767 times
Reputation: 318
Quote:
Originally Posted by alikair View Post
... does a place like that exist?
Yes it does. Read my previous post carefully.
Dan
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Old 02-15-2013, 06:11 AM
 
1,210 posts, read 2,199,962 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alikair View Post
UHgrad, thanks for the reply. I like Oregon, i just don't think Oregon likes me. I had no problems making friends in Hawaii.
I've been in Oregon since 2005 and have no real friends. I don't see that changing either. you need to be white or Mexican or black. I'm not. In Hawaii, I was a Haoli just like the other white guys. here, they are nice and all, but forget about getting close enough to become buddies. I guess thats probably a united states thing, but it came as a shock to me. People here feel cold and distant. I read its called the Oregon freeze. Who knows.
I think that is just in general when you are not from someplace. Folks who grow up somewhere have their friends, jobs, lives and family there already so they need a reason to make additional close/personal friendships. It took me a while to make good friends in Hawaii and honestly most of them were either outer island transplants or people from other states like me.

The funny thing about Hawaii is that it is very asian/pacific island centered with a good amount of haoles that live in the nicer areas and are generally considered outsiders (my opinion). There are few African, European, Indian, or even South American folks out there and the "local" culture is relatively homogeneous in my opinion. I mean sure, a lot of the asian cultures hold on to traditions like obon, chinese new year, or perpetuate some of the Hawaiian traditions... but generally speaking you are either local or not local out there and that is the big dividing line.

NOVA has folks from all over the world, it is crazy. We are only about a 3-4hr drive (very dependent on traffic) from Reston/Arlington/Sterling and go up there fairly often because I have good friends in the area. Folks from Nigeria living next door to families from China down the street from families from Guatamala... and they all speak their native languages plus english. NOVA may also be good for what you want because most of the population these days in not from there so a lot of people are looking to make new friends. That place has been growing like crazy the last decade or so and it really is like a mini-U.N. up there.

Virginia Beach has a mix of transplants and born and raised locals that have their own social circles already. Because of all of the military a lot of folks are coming and going every few years but generally speaking the culture is very different from NOVA. A lot of my high school friends moved to NOVA for better job prospects, some love it and some want to come back to the beach so I don't know if there is a one size fits all.
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Old 02-15-2013, 08:32 AM
 
Location: Portland Oregon via Hawaii
345 posts, read 580,312 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan_in_DC View Post
Yes it does. Read my previous post carefully.
Dan
Sorry Dan, I somehow missed your post.
You make a lot of great points. for some reason or another, I just have this feeling that anywhere near DC is nowhere I would like to live.
I imagine it to be a highly stressed out area with major traffic issues as well as too expensive.

I am looking for a nice slow pace in life AND were people get along.
If I'm wrong about the northern part of NV please point out a city that is what I would need and I will do my research on it.
Your a wealth of knowledge.
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