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Old 12-21-2018, 02:15 PM
 
171 posts, read 81,980 times
Reputation: 265

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Quote:
Originally Posted by brooklynborndad View Post
People vote based on their ideas, values and interests. No one defers in their voting to historical values they don't happen to share. That was true when yankees moved to the south, when southerners moved to the mountain states or California (as they did, often) when appalachians moved to Baltimore or Cleveland, when southern blacks moved to NYC or Chicago.

In any case the political climate of Virginia in 1965 was NOT that of 1765. Virginia in the old days had primogeniture, and rule by a landed gentry who got political deference from poorer whites which included sharecroppers. There was no Byrd machine, or concentrated political influence by VEPCO. The continuity you are looking for ignores how politics, even southern politics, has changed and evolved with all kinds of other historical changes.
Good points. Although I had to look up what "primogeniture" meant. I learned something new today!
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Old 01-12-2019, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Northern VA
94 posts, read 83,816 times
Reputation: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
Well, the Bluer states in the US tend to generally have a higher quality of life so I'm fine with it. I don't think Virginia is ever going to be the next California but I assume it will head in the direction of perhaps a New Jersey/Maryland.
I am late to the thread, but not so fast. Former US Rep. Tom Davis has obsrved the blue side here seems to going right past the New Jersey shade of blue to the California shade of blue.
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Old 01-12-2019, 11:40 AM
 
171 posts, read 81,980 times
Reputation: 265
Thus far Virginia has been fiscally conservative and has balanced its budget, but we'll see what happens moving forward. Below is a link to an interesting article, with a few highlights.

Winter 2018
Virginia Knows How to Balance Its Budget
https://magazine.pewtrusts.org/en/ar...nce-its-budget

"Virginia’s adherence to cautious budget management is partially rooted in its history. Even before Southern states borrowed heavily to finance the Civil War, Virginia had piled up debt to build roads, canals, and railroads. By the time that Governor (and later U.S. Senator) Harry F. Byrd (D) was elected in 1925, paying off the debt was a heavy political lift. He was adamant that the state government balance its budget, keep taxes low, and pay for capital improvements out of available revenue instead of issuing debt. The budget was balanced by 1937."

"Since the Wilder administration, Virginians have elected three Republican and four Democratic governors; the state constitution bars the chief executive from seeking a consecutive term. The two parties have split control between the state House of Delegates and Senate at various times, though Republicans have held a majority in both chambers more years than Democrats have. But partisan advantage does not seem to matter as much in Virginia as it does in other states because of both parties’ allegiance to best fiscal practices. Even when Republican Governor James Gilmore proposed the largest tax cut in state history in 1998, a Legislature with split control phased it in and capped the amount of lost revenue."

"What longtime Virginia political analyst Robert Holsworth calls the state’s “cultural commitment to fiscal responsibility under both parties” is aided by having one of the nation’s longest-tenured state budget experts, Secretary of Finance Richard D. “Ric” Brown, who emerged as Wilder’s top budget specialist in 1990 and has served under every governor and Legislature since. No one can determine Brown’s own party preference, and lawmakers and their staffs implicitly trust him to carry out their policy choices. “Virginia’s finances haven’t been looked at as a partisan thing,” says Brown, who retired in January."

"Not every state can clone a respected official like Brown, but some do share Virginia’s culture of sound fiscal policy and informed management. One measure of a state’s financial standing is its bond rating, and 12 states hold top, or triple-A, ratings across the three credit rating agencies. (Virginia has been a triple-A state since 1938, which state officials say may be longer than any other state.) This top grade allows states to borrow at the lowest rates available, saving on interest costs and boosting the bonds’ appeal to investors."
"No matter who is governor in the years ahead, Virginia faces challenges that will test its fiscal resolve. The number of Virginians 65 and older is growing four times faster than the state’s total population while the number of children under age 18 is increasing at a slower rate. Both trends will affect revenue and spending.

We’re facing strong headwinds,” Delegate Chris Jones, the Republican chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, said following the Nov. 7 election that left the GOP-led Senate and House of Delegates narrowly divided. Del. Jones and other lawmakers stressed the need to uphold Virginia’s tradition of focusing on policy, not politics, in making fiscal decisions. “We can continue on the path of bipartisan cooperation or we can allow this committee to become a battleground for the next election.”
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Old 01-14-2019, 08:22 AM
 
2,456 posts, read 2,231,199 times
Reputation: 1766
Quote:
Originally Posted by HDTBill View Post
I am late to the thread, but not so fast. Former US Rep. Tom Davis has obsrved the blue side here seems to going right past the New Jersey shade of blue to the California shade of blue.
As a former CA resident, I'm fine with that.
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Old 01-28-2019, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Northern VA
94 posts, read 83,816 times
Reputation: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by EmiSky View Post
Thus far Virginia has been fiscally conservative and has balanced its budget, but we'll see what happens moving forward. Below is a link to an interesting article, with a few highlights.

>> The number of Virginians 65 and older is growing four times faster than the state’s total population while the number of children under age 18 is increasing at a slower rate. Both trends will affect revenue and spending.
Interesting about the 65+'ers...I do not know if Virginia is unique in this regard. Aside from Social Security exclusion, Va. tends to tax the 65+'ers pretty heavily compared to say NJ and other states that allow more retirement income exclusion. So we are not a tax haven for all retirees, but we are a tax haven for lower income retirees on Social Security.
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Old 01-28-2019, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Northern VA
94 posts, read 83,816 times
Reputation: 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
As a former CA resident, I'm fine with that.
OK well we won't hold it against you...then again let me think about it. But there you go, I am from NJ so between the two of us we can help judge whether Va. is more like Ca. or NJ in its future blueness.
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