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Old 06-21-2011, 10:13 AM
 
Location: It's in the name!
5,616 posts, read 6,391,152 times
Reputation: 2199

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Quote:
Originally Posted by missimplicity View Post
FYI, I have to second the poster who advised you not to move here if you have children. PG County schools rank 24 out of 24 school districts in the state, even lower Baltimore City schools. To anyone reading this post, I'd advise you to check out the counties north of PG (Anne Arundel/Howard) and even Montgomery, if it would work for you commute...but then the traffic is something you sorta just gotta deal with here.

While I agree that PG County schools do need to improve, I think statements that warn people as if their kids attend a PG County school, they won't make it into college. I'm sorry, but that's a slap in the face to every kid who graduates and moves on to college and does well. I know that PG doesn't rank high against the big three, Montgomery, Fairfax, and Howard counties. But lower than Baltimore?

Word to the wise. Do your own research and visit a school or two. Sheesh. This is not the deep south. Some people would have you believe that the thousands that live here must be drinking some koolaid. Kids do just fine. PG has more working class families where surviving may take precedence over education. If you're educated and make education a priority in your home, your kids will do just fine. I'm a product of pg schools and D.C. schools. If I can do it, so can your kids.
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Old 06-21-2011, 10:59 AM
 
Location: DMV
10,136 posts, read 11,229,228 times
Reputation: 3176
Quote:
Originally Posted by adelphi_sky View Post
While I agree that PG County schools do need to improve, I think statements that warn people as if their kids attend a PG County school, they won't make it into college. I'm sorry, but that's a slap in the face to every kid who graduates and moves on to college and does well. I know that PG doesn't rank high against the big three, Montgomery, Fairfax, and Howard counties. But lower than Baltimore?

Word to the wise. Do your own research and visit a school or two. Sheesh. This is not the deep south. Some people would have you believe that the thousands that live here must be drinking some koolaid. Kids do just fine. PG has more working class families where surviving may take precedence over education. If you're educated and make education a priority in your home, your kids will do just fine. I'm a product of pg schools and D.C. schools. If I can do it, so can your kids.
Actually she's 100% correct, according to schooldigger.com, PG is ranked lower than Baltimore City. I agree with you that going to PG County Schools doesn't mean you won't go to college, but you have to put it in prospective. We're talking about your child's future, wouldn't you want to give them the best or at least better than what you had? A better way of looking at it, when you have a family with young kids in it, what are some of the most important factors in determining where you will move? Schools have to rank way up there if not at the very top.

I am a product of PG County School as well, I went to PG county schools my whole time in grade school, went to college got 3 degrees, got a job, so I guess I made it right? Even with that said, there were things that I went through that I never would want my daughter or future children to go through. I don't want them to go to the run down school buildings that I went to, deal with the apathetic administration, struggle with poor preparation for standardized testing, be surrounded by students who have no sense of worth and therefore do not strive to be the best at the same rate as other places. When I think about my child's future I want her to have the best education I can possibly afford to give her. To me it seems almost irrational for any parent to subject their kids to this school system. There are tons and tons of issues with this county school system and these things aren't changing overnight. But then I also wonder, what would be my motivation to stay here when I could afford to move someone where else? Because I want a bigger house, because I want to live around a lot of black people? It's all about priorities. If my child's education isn't at the top of my list, then what could possibly be more important?
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Old 06-21-2011, 01:04 PM
 
Location: PG County MD
83 posts, read 120,118 times
Reputation: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by meatkins View Post
Actually she's 100% correct, according to schooldigger.com, PG is ranked lower than Baltimore City. I agree with you that going to PG County Schools doesn't mean you won't go to college, but you have to put it in prospective. We're talking about your child's future, wouldn't you want to give them the best or at least better than what you had? A better way of looking at it, when you have a family with young kids in it, what are some of the most important factors in determining where you will move? Schools have to rank way up there if not at the very top.

I am a product of PG County School as well, I went to PG county schools my whole time in grade school, went to college got 3 degrees, got a job, so I guess I made it right? Even with that said, there were things that I went through that I never would want my daughter or future children to go through. I don't want them to go to the run down school buildings that I went to, deal with the apathetic administration, struggle with poor preparation for standardized testing, be surrounded by students who have no sense of worth and therefore do not strive to be the best at the same rate as other places. When I think about my child's future I want her to have the best education I can possibly afford to give her. To me it seems almost irrational for any parent to subject their kids to this school system. There are tons and tons of issues with this county school system and these things aren't changing overnight. But then I also wonder, what would be my motivation to stay here when I could afford to move someone where else? Because I want a bigger house, because I want to live around a lot of black people? It's all about priorities. If my child's education isn't at the top of my list, then what could possibly be more important?

Thank you for corraborating.

I researched plenty, because before deciding to try to relocate out of state, I researched tons of PG County areas/schools. I too, graduated from PG County Schools and went on to college and have a great job. I graduated Summa *** Laude and all that jazz, however, when I transfered into PG County from DC, I found that the work was very easy and expectations were not great. Sure, not every school in PG is bad, but a lot of them do not perform so great. There is serious overcrowding at some schools as well. I immediately changed my direction for house hunting when I realized how much we pay in taxes and how much of that is not reflected in the quality of education. Don't get me wrong, I love where I'm from. This is and will always be home, but the county is not what it used to be and my daughter deserves more. I deserve to be able to have a nice home in a good school district and not pay ridiculous amounts of property taxes. I worked hard to achieve what I have now and I feel like PG cannot give us what WE need. Not everywhere in the county is bad, but you really have to do your research before deciding where to go. All that glitters ain't gold.
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Old 06-21-2011, 01:12 PM
 
Location: PG County MD
83 posts, read 120,118 times
Reputation: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by adelphi_sky View Post

Word to the wise. Do your own research and visit a school or two. Sheesh. This is not the deep south. Some people would have you believe that the thousands that live here must be drinking some koolaid. Kids do just fine. PG has more working class families where surviving may take precedence over education. If you're educated and make education a priority in your home, your kids will do just fine. I'm a product of pg schools and D.C. schools. If I can do it, so can your kids.
Understand that there are some kids, even in homes where education may be a priority, that need special attention, extra help, kind teachers, and a good, uncrowded learning environment to reach their full potential. I'm not saying that that won't happen in PG County, but there are certain areas where you will not get that. I live in Northern PG county, and there are not a lot of schools up here where I'd want to send my daughter. And you refer to working class families in certain areas, however, we all know that areas like Upper Marlboro/Largo/Bowie are mostly white collar professionals and those areas have some of the worst high schools. I agree that parents need to be more involved, but until that changes, I think this will continue to be a problem.
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Old 06-21-2011, 01:41 PM
 
Location: It's in the name!
5,616 posts, read 6,391,152 times
Reputation: 2199
Quote:
Originally Posted by missimplicity View Post
I agree that parents need to be more involved, but until that changes, I think this will continue to be a problem.
That's my point. It is just as much the parent's responsibility as it is the schools. If you let your child manage their own study habits and allow them to watch countless hours of TV, play video games until midnight, facebook all day, and carry cell phones, of course their learning will be affected.

Let's face it, today are kids are more distracted than ever. When I was growing up, all we had was Nintendo and Sega. We didn't have cell phones that you could text on, the internet, or the more engaging video game systems we had today.

I think some parents put too much on the school. How can school work with kids who have no since of discipline or boundaries? That starts at home. If we replaced TV time, video game time, and phone time with reading and math practice, our kids would be much further ahead. But you have parents where education is just not a priority. First, some are just trying to keep food on the table let alone make keeping an eye on their kids. That's no excuse, but in lower income neighborhoods, that's just a given. Some of these kids live around daily drama. And that affects the overall perception about a particular school.

But I can guarantee that if you focused on your child's education, took away the distractions, and had them do over and above what the teacher required, what's stopping them from making straight A's and going on to college just like any other kid in the other jurisdictions?

I do agree that the teacher may have to dumb down the class to where your child may need supplemental coursework to keep the busy. That can be a negative factor. But there are stories behind these numbers I think we're not taking into account. I fail to believe that by definition if your child goes to a PG school they are in great danger of not getting a good education. The foundation starts at home. I believe a good rule of thumb is that there should be a healthy balance between what a child learns at home and what they learn at school.

There are tons of learning aids to try at home to supplement what is learned in school. I disagree with any parent that says they shouldn't have to worry about teaching their child anything extra. I personally think you're doing the child a disservice. If anything, a child would be more receptive to their parents than a teacher. But that's just me.

Look at the PTA meeting attendance. You'll see why the scores are so low. Parents in some of these areas just don't care about education. It's not a priority. You can't tell me that if the PTA meeting was packed and people actually VOTED some of these deadbeat board members out of office that things can't change. Parents have the biggest voice but they are non-existent.
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Old 06-21-2011, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Wylie, Texas
1,574 posts, read 2,301,646 times
Reputation: 2398
Quote:
Originally Posted by missimplicity View Post
Understand that there are some kids, even in homes where education may be a priority, that need special attention, extra help, kind teachers, and a good, uncrowded learning environment to reach their full potential. I'm not saying that that won't happen in PG County, but there are certain areas where you will not get that. I live in Northern PG county, and there are not a lot of schools up here where I'd want to send my daughter. And you refer to working class families in certain areas, however, we all know that areas like Upper Marlboro/Largo/Bowie are mostly white collar professionals and those areas have some of the worst high schools. I agree that parents need to be more involved, but until that changes, I think this will continue to be a problem.

You know it's so sad...down here in Texas, in grappling with the problem of minority schools being low performing, the biggest reason offered up is that in Dallas, the minorities tend to be working class/on welfare, thus their kids tend to perform badly...yet here in the DC area yhou have white collar areas with the same low performance...I dont even know what to think now...
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Old 06-21-2011, 02:48 PM
 
Location: PG County MD
83 posts, read 120,118 times
Reputation: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by biafra4life View Post
You know it's so sad...down here in Texas, in grappling with the problem of minority schools being low performing, the biggest reason offered up is that in Dallas, the minorities tend to be working class/on welfare, thus their kids tend to perform badly...yet here in the DC area yhou have white collar areas with the same low performance...I dont even know what to think now...
This could very well be that these white collar jobs are having a negative effect on child's education. The parents are so focused on work that they don't have time to spend with their kids. And of course this is NOT true about every household in these affluent areas, but if you were to just do a property search and see what it costs to live in these areas, and then look at school performance in these same areas, there's clearly something missing.

Quote:
I do agree that the teacher may have to dumb down the class to where your child may need supplemental coursework to keep the busy. That can be a negative factor. But there are stories behind these numbers I think we're not taking into account. I fail to believe that by definition if your child goes to a PG school they are in great danger of not getting a good education. The foundation starts at home. I believe a good rule of thumb is that there should be a healthy balance between what a child learns at home and what they learn at school.
Actually, I have a friend who's son is in elementary school and she told me that there are already different learning levels built into the classroom curriculum. I think they're are three she said. Of course the lowest level is a waste and she argued with her teacher to get her son on the middle level so he would at least feel challenged and encouraged to learn, you know? And I definitely agree with you about all the technology. We had Nintendo and Super Nintendo and internet was dialup. I wish someone would really look into though. I'm passionate about education, but I have family members who could care less, and as a result, a soon to be 20 year old suburban girl can't even get her GED. But that's a whole nother story.
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Old 06-21-2011, 02:57 PM
 
Location: DMV
10,136 posts, read 11,229,228 times
Reputation: 3176
Quote:
Originally Posted by adelphi_sky View Post
That's my point. It is just as much the parent's responsibility as it is the schools. If you let your child manage their own study habits and allow them to watch countless hours of TV, play video games until midnight, facebook all day, and carry cell phones, of course their learning will be affected.

Let's face it, today are kids are more distracted than ever. When I was growing up, all we had was Nintendo and Sega. We didn't have cell phones that you could text on, the internet, or the more engaging video game systems we had today.

I think some parents put too much on the school. How can school work with kids who have no since of discipline or boundaries? That starts at home. If we replaced TV time, video game time, and phone time with reading and math practice, our kids would be much further ahead. But you have parents where education is just not a priority. First, some are just trying to keep food on the table let alone make keeping an eye on their kids. That's no excuse, but in lower income neighborhoods, that's just a given. Some of these kids live around daily drama. And that affects the overall perception about a particular school.

But I can guarantee that if you focused on your child's education, took away the distractions, and had them do over and above what the teacher required, what's stopping them from making straight A's and going on to college just like any other kid in the other jurisdictions?

I do agree that the teacher may have to dumb down the class to where your child may need supplemental coursework to keep the busy. That can be a negative factor. But there are stories behind these numbers I think we're not taking into account. I fail to believe that by definition if your child goes to a PG school they are in great danger of not getting a good education. The foundation starts at home. I believe a good rule of thumb is that there should be a healthy balance between what a child learns at home and what they learn at school.

There are tons of learning aids to try at home to supplement what is learned in school. I disagree with any parent that says they shouldn't have to worry about teaching their child anything extra. I personally think you're doing the child a disservice. If anything, a child would be more receptive to their parents than a teacher. But that's just me.

Look at the PTA meeting attendance. You'll see why the scores are so low. Parents in some of these areas just don't care about education. It's not a priority. You can't tell me that if the PTA meeting was packed and people actually VOTED some of these deadbeat board members out of office that things can't change. Parents have the biggest voice but they are non-existent.
So you believe the issues with the school system has more to do with the parents than anything? I can see your point, but what do you think about the adminstration? Do you you think they should share a lot of the blame too. I just read today that they are trying to get rid of 700 classroom teachers and what's funny is you never hear about people in the adminstrative office losing their jobs. I wonder what is really the priority of this school system.
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Old 06-21-2011, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Maryland
18,563 posts, read 15,792,009 times
Reputation: 6259
Quote:
Originally Posted by missimplicity View Post
I recently was thinking of buying a house in PG county, but also looked at Howard and Anne Arundel counties. I was astonished at the difference in property taxes between the three counties. PG County taxes are the highest in the state. The rates were increased a couple years ago to help the financial situation, but I think it's hurt more than help. I've lived in PG county most of my life, but was educated primarily in DC when schools were good. FYI, I have to second the poster who advised you not to move here if you have children. PG County schools rank 24 out of 24 school districts in the state, even lower Baltimore City schools. To anyone reading this post, I'd advise you to check out the counties north of PG (Anne Arundel/Howard) and even Montgomery, if it would work for you commute...but then the traffic is something you sorta just gotta deal with here.
Wow about PG schools being worse than Baltimore. Also I believe Baltimore has the highest property tax in the state.
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Old 06-21-2011, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Maryland
18,563 posts, read 15,792,009 times
Reputation: 6259
Quote:
Originally Posted by adelphi_sky View Post
That's my point. It is just as much the parent's responsibility as it is the schools. If you let your child manage their own study habits and allow them to watch countless hours of TV, play video games until midnight, facebook all day, and carry cell phones, of course their learning will be affected.

Let's face it, today are kids are more distracted than ever. When I was growing up, all we had was Nintendo and Sega. We didn't have cell phones that you could text on, the internet, or the more engaging video game systems we had today.

I think some parents put too much on the school. How can school work with kids who have no since of discipline or boundaries? That starts at home. If we replaced TV time, video game time, and phone time with reading and math practice, our kids would be much further ahead. But you have parents where education is just not a priority. First, some are just trying to keep food on the table let alone make keeping an eye on their kids. That's no excuse, but in lower income neighborhoods, that's just a given. Some of these kids live around daily drama. And that affects the overall perception about a particular school.

But I can guarantee that if you focused on your child's education, took away the distractions, and had them do over and above what the teacher required, what's stopping them from making straight A's and going on to college just like any other kid in the other jurisdictions?

I do agree that the teacher may have to dumb down the class to where your child may need supplemental coursework to keep the busy. That can be a negative factor. But there are stories behind these numbers I think we're not taking into account. I fail to believe that by definition if your child goes to a PG school they are in great danger of not getting a good education. The foundation starts at home. I believe a good rule of thumb is that there should be a healthy balance between what a child learns at home and what they learn at school.

There are tons of learning aids to try at home to supplement what is learned in school. I disagree with any parent that says they shouldn't have to worry about teaching their child anything extra. I personally think you're doing the child a disservice. If anything, a child would be more receptive to their parents than a teacher. But that's just me.

Look at the PTA meeting attendance. You'll see why the scores are so low. Parents in some of these areas just don't care about education. It's not a priority. You can't tell me that if the PTA meeting was packed and people actually VOTED some of these deadbeat board members out of office that things can't change. Parents have the biggest voice but they are non-existent.
You're the one that said some months ago that schools shouldn't be a factor in determining where to live if you have a family?
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