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Old 12-09-2011, 11:13 PM
 
1,251 posts, read 737,311 times
Reputation: 817
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
This madness is thanks to Governor O'Malley's Plan Maryland which wants to steer development toward existing areas. However this will decrease the quality of life in existing areas. Gaithersburg is crowded enough, this will only push existing residents further out to Frederick or into West Virginia. The liberals in MoCo don't understand that most of us do not want to live in these dense areas. We prefer to live in a low-density suburban or rural area. Many people moved to Gaithersburg from closer to DC for the open space and suburban lifestyle. These plans for the fairgrounds are ridiculous.

And I don't expect the liberal elites to care much about the "hicks" "rednecks" and "inbred hillbillies and trailer trash" who participate in the fair. I'm sure they rather see these things gone and replaced by "multicultural festivals" with diverse things like rap music and illegal immigrants.
The same people wanting open space are the same ones congesting roads. You're willing to find a job closer to DC or in DC but don't want to live closer.........make so much sense.

People like you prefer open space but demand everything that's closer to DC to come with it. You end up losing that open space that you desire thus defeating the purpose of moving away. Logically, it doesn't make sense to build something on the outskirts of a town instead of the center where people don't need to travel far to get there.

That's what happened in Northern Virginia

People wanted to get away from DC and the congestion, so they move to Loudoun County and Prince Williams leaving everything they eventually demand behind. Well those counties isn't so open anymore is it?

At least the fairground plan is planned out unlike suburbs.
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Old 12-10-2011, 07:52 AM
 
9 posts, read 3,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phyxius View Post
Just like the people in Alexandria/Northern Virginia do not support the National Harbor because the fear that it will take business and tourists away from Alexandria and Arlington......

LOL! Unlikely people in Virginia fear Maryland taking jobs or even tourists from them. If anything, the National Harbor awakens an interest in Alexandria in people who had never heard of it before. I doubt it awakens an interest in Oxon Hill. LOL!
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Old 12-10-2011, 08:00 AM
 
9 posts, read 3,662 times
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If you could compare the DC area to a steak dinner it would be like so:

Northern Virginia is the porterhouse steak, while Suburban Maryland is the baked potato, and the District is the underdone slightly cold broccoli no one eats. (West Virginia's eastern panhandle would be the crumbs left on the table.)
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Old 12-10-2011, 08:23 AM
 
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Default DC area has longest commute times in the Nation

Quote:
Originally Posted by $mk8795 View Post
Maryland License Plates Leave Maryland in the Morning to Virginia commuting to the Dulles Corridor while Barely any Virginia Tags Drive North of the George Washington Parkway Exit but yet its Maryland Tags that are driving North of the American Legion Bridge.....
It's the same scenario across the Wilson Bridge. Has been since I was a kid living in PG County. Looks exciting in the morning to see so much traffic stretched out in PG County, a county that rarely gets traffic compared with the rest of the region. Yet, all those Marylanders from Calvert and PG are heading into Virginia for a reason. That's where all the jobs are. But by the afternoon, it's southern Fairfax that has to deal with the gridlock heading east. Marylanders puddling back to rural suburbia.
Apparently, Marylanders have no issue making some of the longest commutes in the nation. They call it "extreme commuting." DC has the longest commute times in the nation. America's 15 Longest - And Most Costly - Commutes - CBS News

Baltimore rates sixth for "extreme" commutes. Is it because people from Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, western Maryland are pouring into downtown Baltimore each morning? No, it's because people from the Baltimore area (the city, county, Anne Arundel, Howard) are pouring into Northern Virginia. \

Why does DC rate number one? Travel around Northern Virginia during a typical work week and count all the cars from Maryland.
The number of people from Virginia who work in Maryland is negligible. Where I used to work in Rockville back in the early 1990s for a small pharmacuetical startup (which has since relocated to Loundon County), the two coworkers from Virginia were a conversation piece.
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Old 12-10-2011, 12:10 PM
 
7,565 posts, read 4,857,598 times
Reputation: 1291
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mario Smario View Post
If you could compare the DC area to a steak dinner it would be like so:

Northern Virginia is the porterhouse steak, while Suburban Maryland is the baked potato, and the District is the underdone slightly cold broccoli no one eats. (West Virginia's eastern panhandle would be the crumbs left on the table.)
Lol.....now that is funny. DC is the Center of the region and the most sought after part of the area if you can afford it. That's like saying Brooklyn is over Manhattan. Lol....Northern Virginia is Jersey. Maryland is Brooklyn, Bronx, and Queens and DC is Manhattan. That is the only breakdown for the area.
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Old 12-10-2011, 01:59 PM
 
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Default Virginia welcomes Maryland's wealthy refugees

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Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
Lol.....now that is funny. DC is the Center of the region and the most sought after part of the area if you can afford it. That's like saying Brooklyn is over Manhattan. Lol....Northern Virginia is Jersey. Maryland is Brooklyn, Bronx, and Queens and DC is Manhattan. That is the only breakdown for the area.
Well, you're kinda right. You have all the regions in the same geographic locations. However, I would label Maryland more like Long Island (many parts of LI resembled Bowie--built by the same men). Lots of houses, few businesses.
DC more like the Bronx and Brooklyn (crime wise especially).
Virginia is more like Manhattan. Considering Tyson's Corner has the most office space on the east coast (35 million square feet) after only one other jurisdiction--Manhattan, runner up, not a bad position to be in.
BeyondDC - Profiles - Tysons Corner

But who built Tyson's Corner and all those other office hubs scattered about Northern Virginia. Entrepreneurs, mega rich entrepreneurs. Something Maryland hasn't had in quite some time, not since James Rouse, anyway, the man who built Columbia. Men and women with a lots of capital and the will to spend it, added with a desire to place their home towns on the map, is what makes people work. It's the buzz the sounds like effort and innovation.
Where have all Maryland's venture capitalists gone? Take a guess. It starts with a "Northern" and ends with a "Virginia."
Millionaire tax: While the millionaire tax may not be the primary factor making wealthy people leave the state, something's making them get out. - Baltimore Sun
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Old 12-10-2011, 02:34 PM
 
1,251 posts, read 737,311 times
Reputation: 817
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mario Smario View Post
LOL! Unlikely people in Virginia fear Maryland taking jobs or even tourists from them. If anything, the National Harbor awakens an interest in Alexandria in people who had never heard of it before. I doubt it awakens an interest in Oxon Hill. LOL!
You misquoted me. I didn't say that. that was smk and I disagree with what he said. National Harbor doesn't benefit people in Oxon Hill. I believe that what I originally said.
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Old 12-10-2011, 02:48 PM
 
1,251 posts, read 737,311 times
Reputation: 817
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mario Smario View Post
Well, you're kinda right. You have all the regions in the same geographic locations. However, I would label Maryland more like Long Island (many parts of LI resembled Bowie--built by the same men). Lots of houses, few businesses.
DC more like the Bronx and Brooklyn (crime wise especially).
Virginia is more like Manhattan. Considering Tyson's Corner has the most office space on the east coast (35 million square feet) after only one other jurisdiction--Manhattan, runner up, not a bad position to be in.
BeyondDC - Profiles - Tysons Corner

But who built Tyson's Corner and all those other office hubs scattered about Northern Virginia. Entrepreneurs, mega rich entrepreneurs. Something Maryland hasn't had in quite some time, not since James Rouse, anyway, the man who built Columbia. Men and women with a lots of capital and the will to spend it, added with a desire to place their home towns on the map, is what makes people work. It's the buzz the sounds like effort and innovation.
Where have all Maryland's venture capitalists gone? Take a guess. It starts with a "Northern" and ends with a "Virginia."
Millionaire tax: While the millionaire tax may not be the primary factor making wealthy people leave the state, something's making them get out. - Baltimore Sun
who cares about the businesses Northern Virginia has, the fact is that it's not planned well. It's just a big mess and overdeveloped. Maryland may not have all the businesses but at least they think before building and just don't plot things down all kinds of way. Virginia is more like Manhattan? I can't walk in Tysons Corner

Those entrepreneurs and developers are more interested in making money than caring about how they impact quality of life. That's why they going to Virginia because Virginia doesn't care about clearing out land. I don't want the rest of Maryland to look like Waldorf or Northern Virginia with miles and miles of strip malls and car dealership and big box stores. It's an eyesore and I have better thing to do than to sit in traffic.
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Old 12-10-2011, 03:02 PM
 
1,251 posts, read 737,311 times
Reputation: 817
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mario Smario View Post
It's the same scenario across the Wilson Bridge. Has been since I was a kid living in PG County. Looks exciting in the morning to see so much traffic stretched out in PG County, a county that rarely gets traffic compared with the rest of the region. Yet, all those Marylanders from Calvert and PG are heading into Virginia for a reason. That's where all the jobs are. But by the afternoon, it's southern Fairfax that has to deal with the gridlock heading east. Marylanders puddling back to rural suburbia.
Apparently, Marylanders have no issue making some of the longest commutes in the nation. They call it "extreme commuting." DC has the longest commute times in the nation. America's 15 Longest - And Most Costly - Commutes - CBS News

Baltimore rates sixth for "extreme" commutes. Is it because people from Virginia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, western Maryland are pouring into downtown Baltimore each morning? No, it's because people from the Baltimore area (the city, county, Anne Arundel, Howard) are pouring into Northern Virginia. \

Why does DC rate number one? Travel around Northern Virginia during a typical work week and count all the cars from Maryland.
The number of people from Virginia who work in Maryland is negligible. Where I used to work in Rockville back in the early 1990s for a small pharmacuetical startup (which has since relocated to Loundon County), the two coworkers from Virginia were a conversation piece.
I see plenty of Virginia license plate on the BW Parkway heading towards DC in the evening. All of them pile up in the right lane on 295 at the Sewage Plant trying to get over the Wilson Bridge.

I don't see how I-95 North of Baltimore heading South can be pouring into Virginia in the evening especially when according to you...people travel from Baltimore to work in Virginia.

Last edited by Phyxius; 12-10-2011 at 03:12 PM..
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Old 12-10-2011, 05:07 PM
 
7,565 posts, read 4,857,598 times
Reputation: 1291
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mario Smario View Post
Well, you're kinda right. You have all the regions in the same geographic locations. However, I would label Maryland more like Long Island (many parts of LI resembled Bowie--built by the same men). Lots of houses, few businesses.
DC more like the Bronx and Brooklyn (crime wise especially).
Virginia is more like Manhattan. Considering Tyson's Corner has the most office space on the east coast (35 million square feet) after only one other jurisdiction--Manhattan, runner up, not a bad position to be in.
BeyondDC - Profiles - Tysons Corner

But who built Tyson's Corner and all those other office hubs scattered about Northern Virginia. Entrepreneurs, mega rich entrepreneurs. Something Maryland hasn't had in quite some time, not since James Rouse, anyway, the man who built Columbia. Men and women with a lots of capital and the will to spend it, added with a desire to place their home towns on the map, is what makes people work. It's the buzz the sounds like effort and innovation.
Where have all Maryland's venture capitalists gone? Take a guess. It starts with a "Northern" and ends with a "Virginia."
Millionaire tax: While the millionaire tax may not be the primary factor making wealthy people leave the state, something's making them get out. - Baltimore Sun
Ummmm.....lol. Ok, a little urban 101 for you. No area in the whole region has anywhere near the density of DC. People in the city tale the train and many don't own cars. People walk to the store instead of drive to some suburban country parking lot with their mini-van. Anybody who knows anybody from Manhattan knows if they moved to DC, they would prefer the city. No where outside of DC is the city period. I know you don't really know what cities are all about but nothing in Maryland or Virginia is the city. Period!
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