U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland > Washington, DC suburbs in Maryland
 [Register]
Washington, DC suburbs in Maryland Calvert County, Charles County, Montgomery County, and Prince George's County
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
Old 12-10-2011, 08:28 PM
 
11 posts, read 7,003 times
Reputation: 15

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phyxius View Post
I see plenty of Virginia license plate on the BW Parkway heading towards DC in the evening. All of them pile up in the right lane on 295 at the Sewage Plant trying to get over the Wilson Bridge.
They are crossing into Maryland to use I-295 to get into DC.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-10-2011, 08:36 PM
 
11 posts, read 7,003 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
Ummmm.....lol. Ok, a little urban 101 for you. No area in the whole region has anywhere near the density of DC. People in the city tale the train and many don't own cars. People walk to the store instead of drive to some suburban country parking lot with their mini-van. Anybody who knows anybody from Manhattan knows if they moved to DC, they would prefer the city. No where outside of DC is the city period. I know you don't really know what cities are all about but nothing in Maryland or Virginia is the city. Period!
It's about office space. Northern Virginia has more office space than entire nations. More office space than all of Austria. More office space than DC and Maryland (including Baltimore) combined. More office space than Philadelphia and suburbs. More office space than Pittsburgh, Cleveland, St. Louis, Denver, and Kansas City combined. It has A LOT of office space. That's just Northern Virginia, not the remainder of the state. (Richmond, BTW, comes close to topping Baltimore in downtown development, pathetic as it sounds for Baltimore.) And back to my original original post, that adds us to Maryland looking rather, well, let's just say "undeveloped." There is NOT a single metropolitan area in the ENTIRE United States with a population of at least 3 million that has as little development as the Maryland suburbs. NONE! Not Seattle, not Minneapolis, not St. Louis, not Dallas, not Phoenix, not Miami, not Boston, NONE. I grew up in Maryland, I've lived and traveled all over. Maryland looks like the sticks. Keep living in the clouds and voting for career politician Babs Mikulski (hey, Babs still takes the train from Baltimore to DC each day---she's real urban chic). LOL!!!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-10-2011, 08:37 PM
 
1,263 posts, read 769,150 times
Reputation: 834
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarioSmario View Post
They are crossing into Maryland to use I-295 to get into DC.
and what's your reasoning behind Virginia drivers on the BW Parkway in the evenings heading towards DC?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-10-2011, 08:54 PM
 
1,263 posts, read 769,150 times
Reputation: 834
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarioSmario View Post
And back to my original original post, that adds us to Maryland looking rather, well, let's just say "undeveloped." There is NOT a single metropolitan area in the ENTIRE United States with a population of at least 3 million that has as little development as the Maryland suburbs. NONE! Not Seattle, not Minneapolis, not St. Louis, not Dallas, not Phoenix, not Miami, not Boston, NONE. I grew up in Maryland, I've lived and traveled all over. Maryland looks like the sticks. Keep living in the clouds and voting for career politician Babs Mikulski (hey, Babs still takes the train from Baltimore to DC each day---she's real urban chic). LOL!!!
The problem is that you just can't pick a random location and just develop. That's what happening in Northern Virginia When you develop an area, it has to make sense. You develop around people not in a isolated area expecting people to come there. Northern Virginia is just a place where people come and go. Tysons Corner was a quiet normal community turned into disarray. Half of those strip malls and other development are worthless. Virginia has all the office space and may be developed but it's not planned well. I just hope the Silver Line can come through and shape up Northern Virginia.

You need to preserve land for farm and agriculture uses. Some lands just doesn't have any business being bother with.

Last edited by Phyxius; 12-10-2011 at 09:09 PM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-10-2011, 11:12 PM
 
7,751 posts, read 5,064,239 times
Reputation: 1339
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarioSmario View Post
It's about office space. Northern Virginia has more office space than entire nations. More office space than all of Austria. More office space than DC and Maryland (including Baltimore) combined. More office space than Philadelphia and suburbs. More office space than Pittsburgh, Cleveland, St. Louis, Denver, and Kansas City combined. It has A LOT of office space. That's just Northern Virginia, not the remainder of the state. (Richmond, BTW, comes close to topping Baltimore in downtown development, pathetic as it sounds for Baltimore.) And back to my original original post, that adds us to Maryland looking rather, well, let's just say "undeveloped." There is NOT a single metropolitan area in the ENTIRE United States with a population of at least 3 million that has as little development as the Maryland suburbs. NONE! Not Seattle, not Minneapolis, not St. Louis, not Dallas, not Phoenix, not Miami, not Boston, NONE. I grew up in Maryland, I've lived and traveled all over. Maryland looks like the sticks. Keep living in the clouds and voting for career politician Babs Mikulski (hey, Babs still takes the train from Baltimore to DC each day---she's real urban chic). LOL!!!
You have no idea what urban is I see. Unless we are talking about zero lot office buildings in CBD's without surface parking anywhere and first floor retail fronting the street, it doesn't count. Just reading what you type makes it so clear that you are from the suburbs. Nothing in Northern Virginia is urban except Arlington and even Arlington has way too many single family homes to every be really urban. Northern Virginia has suburban office parks. Tyson's Corner won't be urban till 2040. That is really far from now. The highways that run through Tyson's already take away from the urbanity of the future developed Tyson's. Concrete blocks of high rises like downtown DC is the only urban office space that counts. Northern Virginia needs to knock down a couple thousand single family homes if they ever want to be urban. You are such a suburban guy. It's so clear. People in Paris, London, and Tokyo would laugh you off this board of they read how you think Northern Virginia is urban! Lol....have you ever even been on the subway? Do you know what downtown DC looks like? Do you see a bunch of spread out buildings and parking lots everywhere? Do you see grass medians and huge surface parking lots? Lol....
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2011, 08:58 AM
 
11 posts, read 7,003 times
Reputation: 15
Talking Oo-la-la!

Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
People in Paris, London, and Tokyo would laugh you off this board of they read how you think Northern Virginia is urban!
Now we see a clearer picture why Maryland is in the economic mess it's in, and has been for 30 years. The "urban" uber cool residents of Maryland are more concerned with what people in Europe and Japan think about them than being a national joke (if anyone is even thinking about them). LOL!
If I'm not mistaken, people in Asia and Europe consider high rise or sky scraper development to be chic and cool and a sign of progress. They look to American cities for examples. DC is much like european capitals, which have no high rise development in the center of the cities. All the building that goes upward, if there is any, takes place in the peripheral of the cities. (DC has height codes whereas european cities are just so old there's no room.)
I'm sure people in Paris (oo-la-la) and London (milk with your tea, mum?) would look at Tyson's Corners, Crystal City, Roslyn, Alexandria along the Beltway, even Springfield off I-95 and say, "wow, check it out. Now that's modern progress! We have nothing like that in our old dilapidated countries!" But wait until they see Maryland! LOL!
Try to figure it out. We're not discussing technical aspects of "urban" versus suburban. We're talking about the fact that the state of Maryland lags. It lags in nearly every category of development for most states with large cities. It lags in highway infrastructure, it lags in office space infrastructure, it lags in business development. If you're happy living there, good. Stay, pay your taxes, listen to your leaders, commute to Virginia and DC (and increasingly Delaware and Pennsylvania). Enjoy your standard of living plummeting as Marylanders spend more hours behind the wheel than any people in North America. Oo-la-la!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2011, 12:17 PM
 
2 posts, read 582 times
Reputation: 10
Do people realize that the official name of the Washington DC CSA is the "Washington/Baltimore/Northern Virginia Metropolitan Area"? [url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Washington-Baltimore-Northern_Virginia_CSA,_2005.png[/url]
Why doesn't suburban Maryland get honorable mention, while Northern Virginia does?
The answer is quite obvious.
At least the US census mentions Baltimore.... but for how much longer???
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2011, 12:19 PM
 
2 posts, read 582 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mario Smario View Post
If you could compare the DC area to a steak dinner it would be like so:

Northern Virginia is the porterhouse steak, while Suburban Maryland is the baked potato, and the District is the underdone slightly cold broccoli no one eats. (West Virginia's eastern panhandle would be the crumbs left on the table.)
LOL!!! It's true. Although nothing in the DC area can be comparable to a Chateaubriand.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2011, 01:15 PM
 
1,263 posts, read 769,150 times
Reputation: 834
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarioSmario View Post
Now we see a clearer picture why Maryland is in the economic mess it's in, and has been for 30 years. The "urban" uber cool residents of Maryland are more concerned with what people in Europe and Japan think about them than being a national joke (if anyone is even thinking about them). LOL!
If I'm not mistaken, people in Asia and Europe consider high rise or sky scraper development to be chic and cool and a sign of progress. They look to American cities for examples. DC is much like european capitals, which have no high rise development in the center of the cities. All the building that goes upward, if there is any, takes place in the peripheral of the cities. (DC has height codes whereas european cities are just so old there's no room.)
I'm sure people in Paris (oo-la-la) and London (milk with your tea, mum?) would look at Tyson's Corners, Crystal City, Roslyn, Alexandria along the Beltway, even Springfield off I-95 and say, "wow, check it out. Now that's modern progress! We have nothing like that in our old dilapidated countries!" But wait until they see Maryland! LOL!
Try to figure it out. We're not discussing technical aspects of "urban" versus suburban. We're talking about the fact that the state of Maryland lags. It lags in nearly every category of development for most states with large cities. It lags in highway infrastructure, it lags in office space infrastructure, it lags in business development. If you're happy living there, good. Stay, pay your taxes, listen to your leaders, commute to Virginia and DC (and increasingly Delaware and Pennsylvania). Enjoy your standard of living plummeting as Marylanders spend more hours behind the wheel than any people in North America. Oo-la-la!
You're basing your claims on one user post of how all residence in Maryland think?

Can you provide a source that Asia and Europe look to American cities as an example?

If you still don't understand, that's okay you will sooner or later whether is it by reviewing my post at a future time or on your own.

Maryland actually cares about its farming and agriculture and plan development accordingly. They aren't going to let some greedy developer come in try to have his way. I've said this before, you build around people not in the middle of nowhere expecting people to travel there.
Tysons, Springfield, there's no energy, no community life within those places. People just come during the day and empty out by night. How can you say that you're not comparing urban vs. suburban then say that Maryland lags in development for states with large cities? Tysons and Springfield aren't cities. Northern Virginia is only hurting themselves long term.

Maryland has its share of problems but the lack of development isn't one of them. Their economic problems is solely on overspending.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2011, 02:05 PM
 
7,751 posts, read 5,064,239 times
Reputation: 1339
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarioSmario View Post
Now we see a clearer picture why Maryland is in the economic mess it's in, and has been for 30 years. The "urban" uber cool residents of Maryland are more concerned with what people in Europe and Japan think about them than being a national joke (if anyone is even thinking about them). LOL!
If I'm not mistaken, people in Asia and Europe consider high rise or sky scraper development to be chic and cool and a sign of progress. They look to American cities for examples. DC is much like european capitals, which have no high rise development in the center of the cities. All the building that goes upward, if there is any, takes place in the peripheral of the cities. (DC has height codes whereas european cities are just so old there's no room.)
I'm sure people in Paris (oo-la-la) and London (milk with your tea, mum?) would look at Tyson's Corners, Crystal City, Roslyn, Alexandria along the Beltway, even Springfield off I-95 and say, "wow, check it out. Now that's modern progress! We have nothing like that in our old dilapidated countries!" But wait until they see Maryland! LOL!
Try to figure it out. We're not discussing technical aspects of "urban" versus suburban. We're talking about the fact that the state of Maryland lags. It lags in nearly every category of development for most states with large cities. It lags in highway infrastructure, it lags in office space infrastructure, it lags in business development. If you're happy living there, good. Stay, pay your taxes, listen to your leaders, commute to Virginia and DC (and increasingly Delaware and Pennsylvania). Enjoy your standard of living plummeting as Marylanders spend more hours behind the wheel than any people in North America. Oo-la-la!
Lol....you are mistaken. European cities are extremely dense low rise cities like Washington D.C. D.C. was designed like Paris. Have you ever been to Rome, Paris, or Amsterdam? Lol....you sound like you have never been out of your single family suburban street. Try to add a little culture to your life and you would know this. People don't look at southern looking designs like Atlanta, Houston, and Northern Virginia think ooww anything. This is comical. Northern Virginia is the part of DC we get blasted about. How country and spread out it is. Boston, NYC, Philly etc. etc. don't have sprawling suburbs like DC. You are the opposite of urban and you are holding our region back. I can tell you have never been on the city vs. city board because you would get absolutely blasted. How about you go say this over there. Lol....you belong in the burbs with your McMansions and all your trees and forests. Embarrassing!!!! Nobody cares about skyscrapers unless it's zero lot development. Do you even know what zero lot development means?

Last edited by MDAllstar; 12-11-2011 at 02:24 PM..
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland > Washington, DC suburbs in Maryland
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top