U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland > Washington, DC suburbs in Maryland
 [Register]
Washington, DC suburbs in Maryland Calvert County, Charles County, Montgomery County, and Prince George's County
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 05-09-2012, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Macao
12,673 posts, read 18,861,966 times
Reputation: 6246
Default The 'FALL LINE' going through Maryland & DC.

I believe this discussion was buried within another thread (perhaps even on the Baltimore Forum). Not so easy to find again, but it brought up a very interesting item.

So what are some significant differences that you've noticed between the two sides of the Fall Line? Thinking of trees, foilage, plants, weather patterns, etc.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
THE FALL LINE:
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-09-2012, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Sneads Ferry, NC
6,880 posts, read 6,673,495 times
Reputation: 2806
The only significant difference I know of is the amount of snow. People have said that Montgomery County schools should have two different kinds of snow days. Sometimes the snow in lower Montgomery is very light, and it's much heavier in upper Montgomery. The school system has to cancel school for the whole county, but it could have proceeded in lower Montgomery.

As far as trees, etc. you don't see any difference right at the fall line. But you might see a few more pines out in western Montgomery.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-09-2012, 07:50 PM
 
Location: It's in the name!
2,843 posts, read 2,011,902 times
Reputation: 848
The Fall Line is usually where the rain/snow line sets up in borderline winter storms for the DC area. Forecasters though almost always use I-95 as the marker but I-95 parallels the Fall Line up to Baltimore.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-09-2012, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Cumberland
3,031 posts, read 4,205,088 times
Reputation: 1257
Quote:
Originally Posted by goldenage1 View Post
The only significant difference I know of is the amount of snow. People have said that Montgomery County schools should have two different kinds of snow days. Sometimes the snow in lower Montgomery is very light, and it's much heavier in upper Montgomery. The school system has to cancel school for the whole county, but it could have proceeded in lower Montgomery.

As far as trees, etc. you don't see any difference right at the fall line. But you might see a few more pines out in western Montgomery.
The fall line doesn't cut through much of Montgomery County at all. Perhaps just a tiny sliver near D.C. The difference in climate is lattitude (to a small degree) and the urban heat island effect of D.C.

As for the flora, there is a clear difference when you hit the fall line. In fact flora, even more than topography is when I know I have crossed it. West of the fall line hardwoods dominate. You have the occasional White Pine, or Scrub Pine, but Oak and Hickory dominate most sites with the usual cohort of Beech, Tulip Poplar, Maples, based on individual site indexes and forest age.

East of the fall line, Big yellow pines prosper. The sandier soil gives them an advantage they lack in the Piedmont. The Yellow Pines mix with scrubbier oaks, American Holly becomes a large component of the understory.

This is best noticed heading south on I-97 out of Baltimore, where Fall line starts just before the interchange, and on Rt. 32. On Rt. 32, once you get past Mt. Meade into Anne Arundel county, the flora changes quickly and dramatically. If you know what trees to look for, you can't miss it.

Last edited by westsideboy; 05-09-2012 at 08:17 PM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-10-2012, 12:20 PM
 
82 posts, read 75,690 times
Reputation: 59
I saw this chart in that other thread, and since then I have been paying attention as I drive around. IMO, one can really see the differences, even if you just take a simple drive from Annapolis to Frederick. I love this map!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-10-2012, 05:27 PM
Status: "Hitoribotchi no yoru" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Maryland about 20 miles NW of DC
4,594 posts, read 2,071,649 times
Reputation: 1620
People need a little lesson on geography! The Fall Line represents a place where the topography undergoes a rapid increase in altitude over a short distance. Rivers and streams crossing the Fall Line either go over a water fall or series of rapids or enter a canyon. This is seen in Maryland on Rock Creek, the Potomac River, Patapsco and Gun Powder Rivers and the Susquehanna River. In colonial times this meant having to do a portage if one wanted to go up stream beyond the Fall Line. Later these places had value because you built a water wheel and set up a mill or factory using water power. The Fall Line is one of the reasons a canal with locks called the C&O Canal qas built around the Great Falls on the Potomac. Today there is a dam with a hydroelectric power plant on the Susquehanna River at Coniwingo on the Fall Line.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-10-2012, 05:47 PM
 
1,109 posts, read 1,193,867 times
Reputation: 398
Of course when you go East past the fall line, snow will be lighter. Not a surprise here. As goldenage mentioned, the snow in the part of Montgomery that I live in will get less snow than the Northern part of the county.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-11-2012, 10:36 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,476 posts, read 5,830,527 times
Reputation: 2970
The fact that the fall line bisects Baltimore is really neat. To have the hilly, almost foothills-like topography of Leakin Park and also a big, low harbor all in the same city is unique.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland > Washington, DC suburbs in Maryland
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top