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Washington, DC suburbs in Maryland Calvert County, Charles County, Montgomery County, and Prince George's County
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Old 03-25-2008, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Log home in the Appalachians
10,494 posts, read 10,070,117 times
Reputation: 6838

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ffknight918 View Post
Actually UMUC is University of Maryland University College, which is part of the UMD campus.

However, if I need to get certified with a firefighter 1 class or something(I have it, but it may not transfer), I would be going to Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute. That may be what you are thinking of because someone told me its just a block or two away.
Just a little advice, I was born and raised and grew up in Prince George's County, grew up in the Riverdale, Hyattsville and College Park area,I know the area you're talking about, I lived there for almost 60 years, you might not think that you're going to need a vehicle and that the Metro may get you around to where you want to go, but believe me you will want to have your vehicle with you, there will be times that you will wish that you had it.
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Old 03-25-2008, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Metro Washington DC
12,553 posts, read 18,931,506 times
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Yes that's right. The UM Campus is just a few blocks away. If going to UMUC get off Metro on the west side of the station (College Park) and walk a few blocks to campus. If going to the Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute, you exit on the east side.
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Old 03-25-2008, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
1,340 posts, read 3,678,890 times
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Thanks again guys.

ptsum... if I'm working and going to school there, you think I'd still need it? The only reasons that I'd be going anywhere special would be once in awhile on weekends to DC or something for the nightlife. Would I still need it then since I'm not really going to need to travel anywhere?

If I make the move I'll probably base it off of what the fire dept tells me. They might have a few vehicles that I can use which would make things easier. It would just be really nice not to need to pay for my insurance since I won't be making any money.
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Old 03-26-2008, 09:22 AM
 
415 posts, read 1,777,554 times
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I was with the PGFD for several years. Here's my take:
Co. 1 (Hyattsville) runs a "super station" with 2 engines, a tiller truck (because real trucks bend in the middle!), ambulance, and a heavy rescue squad. They run a good volume of calls, and you'll see a good amount of fire. (Probably more in the vollie system than you see in a paid system other places)
Co. 34 (Chillum-Adelphi) runs 2 engines, a tiller truck (tiller trucks are still popular around here, mainly because there are a lot of small streets) and an ambulance. A lot of mexican and central american immigrants in the area makes it difficult sometimes to do your job.
Co. 12 (College Park) runs 2 engines, a foam unit (an old Mack CF, its sweet), a straight truck, and a BLS ambulance. The station has an ALS unit also, but its staffed by career people, not volunteers (there are no volunteer ALS providers in the county). The station live-ins are for people attending the fire science program at UMCP (basically they're university owned dorms, and they look it).
Co. 11 (Branchville) runs 2 engines and a BLS ambulance. I swear some times it would seem like they'd flip their engine over pulling out of their station, but a bunch of good guys.
Co. 14 (Berwyn Heights) runs a tiller truck, 2 heavy rescue squads, a BLS ambulance, and a boat (on the 1 or 2 calls a year it gets). A lot of good people there, I really liked my time with them. They KNOW vehicle rescue and truck work because its all they do.
Other stations start getting away from the university, and I don't have a lot of experience with them.
Regarding your certs, PG is pretty accepting of outside certifications, but you'll need at least Firefighter I, HazMat Ops, and CPR to run calls. I know they prefer people to at least have their EMT-B certification. If you are a rookie, and they tell you to ride the ambulance, don't *****. There used to be some wild initiations in PGFD, and a lot of those old time die-hards are still around to give new people grief if they ***** too much. Call MFRI as to whether or not your certs will be accepted by the state, and then call the station to see if it really matters. If you're pro-qualed then you'll be good to go immediately.
Transportation to the university- The university runs a shuttle bus system (not like regular shuttles, this is a full fledged transit system) that runs throughout the area. It's changed routes since I worked for it, but it still goes to where the students are. From Hyattsville, you can either hop a bus (the shuttle system is free for students), or take Metro to College Park and take the shuttle from there. MFRI is right across the street from the College Park metro station, but it's a busy street, so you'll have to walk about a block total to get up to the traffic light and back down to where you want to go so you don't get hit by 60 mph cars. Department of Transportation Services - University of Maryland for more info on the shuttle system.
Regarding personal transportation, most stations have a utility vehicle (car, pickup truck, or SUV), BUT you're required to have Maryland EVOC before you can drive anything in PG. Also, there (used to be at least) is a volunteer recruit school at the PG training academy in southern PG County that you'll need to attend (1 weekend I think, basically an official orientation to the PGFD), and you'll either need your own car, or find someone to ride with. With live-ins you still need to get your own food, so you'll need some way of getting to the store. Getting down to DC if you start working there you'll need a car too.
There is a forum for firefighters in Maryland, but you need to take the bitching with a grain of salt. PM for details. One last thing, for the most part the career and volunteer staff get along just fine. There are a few bad eggs on each side that tend to get blown out of proportion. Just follow the basic rule- treat others the way you want to be treated.
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Old 03-26-2008, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Log home in the Appalachians
10,494 posts, read 10,070,117 times
Reputation: 6838
Quote:
Originally Posted by emsgoof View Post
I was with the PGFD for several years. Here's my take:
Co. 1 (Hyattsville) runs a "super station" with 2 engines, a tiller truck (because real trucks bend in the middle!), ambulance, and a heavy rescue squad. They run a good volume of calls, and you'll see a good amount of fire. (Probably more in the vollie system than you see in a paid system other places)
Co. 34 (Chillum-Adelphi) runs 2 engines, a tiller truck (tiller trucks are still popular around here, mainly because there are a lot of small streets) and an ambulance. A lot of mexican and central american immigrants in the area makes it difficult sometimes to do your job.
Co. 12 (College Park) runs 2 engines, a foam unit (an old Mack CF, its sweet), a straight truck, and a BLS ambulance. The station has an ALS unit also, but its staffed by career people, not volunteers (there are no volunteer ALS providers in the county). The station live-ins are for people attending the fire science program at UMCP (basically they're university owned dorms, and they look it).
Co. 11 (Branchville) runs 2 engines and a BLS ambulance. I swear some times it would seem like they'd flip their engine over pulling out of their station, but a bunch of good guys.
Co. 14 (Berwyn Heights) runs a tiller truck, 2 heavy rescue squads, a BLS ambulance, and a boat (on the 1 or 2 calls a year it gets). A lot of good people there, I really liked my time with them. They KNOW vehicle rescue and truck work because its all they do.
Other stations start getting away from the university, and I don't have a lot of experience with them.
Regarding your certs, PG is pretty accepting of outside certifications, but you'll need at least Firefighter I, HazMat Ops, and CPR to run calls. I know they prefer people to at least have their EMT-B certification. If you are a rookie, and they tell you to ride the ambulance, don't *****. There used to be some wild initiations in PGFD, and a lot of those old time die-hards are still around to give new people grief if they ***** too much. Call MFRI as to whether or not your certs will be accepted by the state, and then call the station to see if it really matters. If you're pro-qualed then you'll be good to go immediately.
Transportation to the university- The university runs a shuttle bus system (not like regular shuttles, this is a full fledged transit system) that runs throughout the area. It's changed routes since I worked for it, but it still goes to where the students are. From Hyattsville, you can either hop a bus (the shuttle system is free for students), or take Metro to College Park and take the shuttle from there. MFRI is right across the street from the College Park metro station, but it's a busy street, so you'll have to walk about a block total to get up to the traffic light and back down to where you want to go so you don't get hit by 60 mph cars. Department of Transportation Services - University of Maryland for more info on the shuttle system.
Regarding personal transportation, most stations have a utility vehicle (car, pickup truck, or SUV), BUT you're required to have Maryland EVOC before you can drive anything in PG. Also, there (used to be at least) is a volunteer recruit school at the PG training academy in southern PG County that you'll need to attend (1 weekend I think, basically an official orientation to the PGFD), and you'll either need your own car, or find someone to ride with. With live-ins you still need to get your own food, so you'll need some way of getting to the store. Getting down to DC if you start working there you'll need a car too.
There is a forum for firefighters in Maryland, but you need to take the bitching with a grain of salt. PM for details. One last thing, for the most part the career and volunteer staff get along just fine. There are a few bad eggs on each side that tend to get blown out of proportion. Just follow the basic rule- treat others the way you want to be treated.

This pretty much covers everything you'll need to know, a lot of good advice here, and yes you will need your vehicle, because if you're going down into DC for the nightlife, I don't think you're going to want to go down there in a county vehicle, it just wouldn't look right and I don't think they would permit that.
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Old 03-26-2008, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Baltimore
1,340 posts, read 3,678,890 times
Reputation: 655
Wow, great information. Thanks. I'm actually going to be riding with 14 as well when I go there. That was definitely one of the stations that got my attention. I'll let ya know if I have any questions, which I'm sure I will.

So the metro doesn't work too great when going to DC? I meant that I would take that if going to DC for something(nightlife). I just brought up the station's vehicle for things such as shopping. Sorry, if it sounds like I'm questioning your knowledge. I'm not, just wanting to get as much info as possible.

Thanks.
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Old 03-26-2008, 02:05 PM
 
415 posts, read 1,777,554 times
Reputation: 111
It works fine, as long as it goes near where you want it to. All of the rail lines focus on the federal city (which is a small section of the actual District), so outside that area, you may not find a rail line close. Also, the Metro closes at 2am I believe, it doesn't run all night.
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Old 03-27-2008, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Baltimore
1,340 posts, read 3,678,890 times
Reputation: 655
Thanks again for everything. Can't wait to go there in June.
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