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Washington, DC suburbs in Maryland Calvert County, Charles County, Montgomery County, and Prince George's County
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Old 06-11-2009, 11:42 AM
 
4 posts, read 6,005 times
Reputation: 10
Default Got a job in DC, where to live?

HI All!
I got a job in DC and plan to relocate from New Jersey.Have 2 kids going to preschool so, looking for a place which offers good public schools,not too far from DC and someplace where I rent now and buy a house later say in a year or so.Maryland is the suggested place but I am still a lattle vague as to where exactly in MD.Please advise me on this.Thanks
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Old 06-11-2009, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD (Charles Village)
22 posts, read 72,212 times
Reputation: 13
Who suggested Maryland?
I'm suggesting you live in DC. Why live elsewhere? You've got the metro, plenty to do...
"Good public schools" more often than not means "White public schools" to a lot of people.
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Old 06-11-2009, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Silver Spring, Maryland / But still having San Diego / Eastlake withdrawal damn it !!!
339 posts, read 918,199 times
Reputation: 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by losingmylycosa View Post
Who suggested Maryland?
I'm suggesting you live in DC. Why live elsewhere? You've got the metro, plenty to do...
"Good public schools" more often than not means "White public schools" to a lot of people.
I don't suggest living in DC unless you are use to Urban living which is great if thats what your use to. If not DC's safer neighborhoods are far and in between, not to mention EXPENSIVE. But you do get what you pay for.

DC schools are not good, with the exception of a few in great neighborhoods or private.

I would suggest Montgomery County Maryland which borders DC to the North. It too has had some changes over the years and you have to do your homework on what areas to live .

My wife is in the Navy and works at Bethesda Naval Hospital so we found the little town of Kensington (20895 zip code) very nice place to still raise a family. The schools are very good as we have one starting next year and all the neighbors around us rave about the local school in our area.

Silver Spring (which is a big area) of Montgomery County also has some nice areas as well. Which again are close to DC for driving or better yet Metro stops nearby as well for the subway. I would concentrate on 20902 ,20905 ,20910 zip codes for Silver Spring. In my research they tend to have the better schools in them.

There are other areas that are safe as well like Rockville , Bethesda ,Chevy Chase , Potomac and others that are very expensive or farther out. I hope this helps some and I'm sure others will chime in on any areas I might have missed. Good Luck and welcome to Maryland !!!!!

PS- The town of Olney would be our number one spot if we were going to be here long term (which were not because we're military). The only thing is it further away from DC. But it is a very nice area with great schools. It would be worth the extra commute time to my wife and I.
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Old 06-11-2009, 02:37 PM
 
4 posts, read 6,005 times
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Thanks Bunky.You got it right that we are not very used to the urban living, Ever here in NJ we live in the suburban area with all the amenities which one can think of.i Looked into the Olney city, looks pretty good too but I couldn't find the nearest station to it ..By car google map shows a 35 minute ride but with traffic in mind it can lead to an hour also.so what do you say about that?
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Old 06-12-2009, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD (Charles Village)
22 posts, read 72,212 times
Reputation: 13
Yeah, but there is also the social responsibility question. The reason cities like D.C. are so bad is because middle-class people with families refuse to live in them. The only way that is going to change is if people make different, less selfish and cowardly choices. Honestly, I'm really sick of people working in D.C. and not living in it. Either you're part of the problem or part of the solution.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bunky3301 View Post
I don't suggest living in DC unless you are use to Urban living which is great if thats what your use to. If not DC's safer neighborhoods are far and in between, not to mention EXPENSIVE. But you do get what you pay for.

DC schools are not good, with the exception of a few in great neighborhoods or private.

I would suggest Montgomery County Maryland which borders DC to the North. It too has had some changes over the years and you have to do your homework on what areas to live .

My wife is in the Navy and works at Bethesda Naval Hospital so we found the little town of Kensington (20895 zip code) very nice place to still raise a family. The schools are very good as we have one starting next year and all the neighbors around us rave about the local school in our area.

Silver Spring (which is a big area) of Montgomery County also has some nice areas as well. Which again are close to DC for driving or better yet Metro stops nearby as well for the subway. I would concentrate on 20902 ,20905 ,20910 zip codes for Silver Spring. In my research they tend to have the better schools in them.

There are other areas that are safe as well like Rockville , Bethesda ,Chevy Chase , Potomac and others that are very expensive or farther out. I hope this helps some and I'm sure others will chime in on any areas I might have missed. Good Luck and welcome to Maryland !!!!!

PS- The town of Olney would be our number one spot if we were going to be here long term (which were not because we're military). The only thing is it further away from DC. But it is a very nice area with great schools. It would be worth the extra commute time to my wife and I.
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Old 06-12-2009, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD (Charles Village)
22 posts, read 72,212 times
Reputation: 13
Oh, that's hilarious. New Jersey is the most urbanized state. You should meet my wife, she's from Wyoming. It's not like she's used to urban living.

Quote:
Originally Posted by syeem View Post
Thanks Bunky.You got it right that we are not very used to the urban living, Ever here in NJ we live in the suburban area with all the amenities which one can think of.i Looked into the Olney city, looks pretty good too but I couldn't find the nearest station to it ..By car google map shows a 35 minute ride but with traffic in mind it can lead to an hour also.so what do you say about that?
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Old 06-15-2009, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Northwest Suburbs of Denver
433 posts, read 537,628 times
Reputation: 282
Olney is a nice area, but it is SUCH a long commute to D.C. that you wouldn't have time to enjoy that nice recreation center ;-)

Since you are coming from a suburban area, here are some suggestions for some close-in suburbs. These are older suburbs, so they will be different from the newer "brand-new, tear down all the trees, build a massive housing development and a bunch of Bed,Bath & Beyond, Olive Garden, and Best Buy" type of suburbs, but some of us like our older suburbs with occasional pockets of normality.

Neighborhoods


I would say that these areas of P.G. County, but inside the beltway, AND North of D.C. that you may want to consider are as follows:
Historic Hyattsville (1-2 miles to metro; walkable)
University Park (1-2 miles to metro; walkable)
College Park (0-2 miles to metro, except Berwyn)
Berwyn Heights (2-3 miles to metro, not easily walkable)
Greenbelt (2-3 miles to metro, not easily walkable)
Cheverly (1-2 miles to metro, walkable)
All of these areas have reasonable rents and crime stats for the region. In any of these schools you'll likely find a mix of races and socio-economic statuses.

You may want to take a look at my town, University Park, in Prince George's County. University Park is an incorporated town within P.G. County with our own town government, police force, sanitation department, etc. Very similar in look and feel to the very expensive area of Chevy Chase, Maryland but with houses that are a little smaller and a LOT more affordable. Metro station is with a mile, and we have a town shuttle that runs throughout the town and to the metro every morning and evening. Many people assume that since University Park is in Prince George's County that it is unsafe, but that is UNTRUE ! Our town has lower crime than any almost any other area in P.G. OR Montgomery County. I could go on and on - but check out our town website [url="http://www.upmd.org"]www.upmd.org[/URL]

Towns, cities, unincorporated Areas
Many areas of Montgomery County and Prince George’s County are not in a particular town or city. For example, Silver Spring is not a real town. It has no mayor, town government or political boundaries. It is an unincorporated area of MoCo. Services (police, sanitation, etc.) are provided by MoCo. Conversely, Hyattsville in P.G. County is really an incorporated city with specific political/geographic boundaries. BUT, many people call random areas of PG County (that aren't incorporated into a town) Hyattsville (when they are really miles away from Hyattsville) and they call random areas of MoCo “Silver Spring” when they are nowhere near the downtown Silver Spring area. So, it's better to talk about neighborhoods or small actual cities/towns when you're talking about MoCo or P.G. County.

Crime
Since you're coming from the suburbs of New Jersey, I'll mention something about crime near D.C.
In all of these areas (and frankly anywhere in the DC metro region) you're going to have petty crime, like car break-ins. So I wouldn't take anybody's word for it that a particular area is safe or unsafe. Look at the specifics of the crime statistics: the street locations and the specific types of crime.

Schools
Many school districts in the DC area typically cross several neighborhoods with varying levels of socio-economic status and that skews the rankings. So, if you are coming from an area where all the lesser levels of socio-economic status went to one school and all the higher levels of SES went to another school - then the DC/suburban stats will look very different to you.

When talking about the “best” schools, here are some things to consider:
School rankings are based on test scores, and the test scores of any given child are directly related to the education level of the mother. In the entirety of the D.C. metro area, there are pockets of extreme wealth (with highly educated mothers) and there are pockets of lower wealth (with typically less educated mothers). You can’t really look at school rankings here like you can in other, less urban, areas. There’s also some positives to being at a low ranking schools. Low ranking schools are often Title I schools and therefore get more funding. More funding means more teachers, paraprofessionals, and supplemental funding for after school programs.

What I would look for is the specific ranking/test scores of a particular school within a county and use that as a guide. Cross reference that with neighborhoods with homes in your price range. Look for whether there is an increase in test scores from year to year, this shows you that the children are learning. Also look at class size. Finally, consider what environment your child will thrive in. Lots of “high performing” schools are in buildings that were built in the seventies when the phase of “open classrooms” was popular. These were very large classrooms separated by partitions – even the best school with the best teacher has a hard time with easily distractible children in that environment!

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Old 06-15-2009, 12:48 PM
 
Location: California, MD
876 posts, read 1,464,578 times
Reputation: 368
I would think it would be worth the extra commute time to live in Olney... My dad makes the commute into DC to GW university everyday and it takes him just under an hour... Some of those areas in PG specifically Hyattsville I would not recommend as well as some areas in Silver Spring...
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Old 06-15-2009, 01:39 PM
 
269 posts, read 945,619 times
Reputation: 67
consider northern VA as well.
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Old 06-15-2009, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
205 posts, read 538,386 times
Reputation: 160
Quote:
Originally Posted by losingmylycosa View Post
Yeah, but there is also the social responsibility question. The reason cities like D.C. are so bad is because middle-class people with families refuse to live in them. The only way that is going to change is if people make different, less selfish and cowardly choices. Honestly, I'm really sick of people working in D.C. and not living in it. Either you're part of the problem or part of the solution.
You can't force people to live in the city. The middle-class has clearly spoken and they reject the inner-city. Instead of complaining about their choices and trying to trap them inside the city limits like Baltimore does, try enticing them to move in. Stick a carrot in their faces and see if they bite. They won't when taxes are sky high, crime is uncontrollable, and properties are worthless. I see a lot of complaining about people working in the cities and living out in the suburbs or rural areas, but I see no attempt to make any changes. All I see are attempts to herd people into a desired course of action rather than to entice them to come of their free will.

The OP may also want to think about Howard County, MD, although Northern VA is probably cheaper and comparable.
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