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Old 08-02-2010, 01:05 PM
 
2,414 posts, read 3,192,651 times
Reputation: 613
Quote:
Originally Posted by coldbliss View Post
Count me in the minority but I miss the gritty, dark and under-developed era of DC. Reasons why I miss the old DC?

1. As a couple people noted...it was much cheaper to rent and to buy property in many neighborhoods today. In the mid-1990s, I could have staked some property in Logan Circle on a pittance of a salary. Today? Forget about it.

It wasn't unusual for cash-starved college students and artists to rent places near DuPont, Adams Morgan, Columbia Heights, and Capitol Hill. You can struggle with finances and still live in a dump near many amenities such as restaurants, bars, and public transportation. Today? Apartments once inhabited by artists and college students were spruced up and converted into $500,000 condo units. How many students can afford a half-Mil condo?

2. More independent-owned businesses dotted the District back in the day. Restaurants, hardware stores, pharmacies and clothing stores were owned and operated by families. Today? Good luck finding a store that doesn't have a national chain outreach. Part of this transformation is due to escalating rents imposed by property owners during the Boom-Boom years of the late 1990s and early 2000s. Independent shops couldn't afford to renew the leases but a corporate giant like Starbucks could easily swing the rent.

3. Race relations were better before the Big Gentrification. Before the Boom-Boom times of the 1990s and 2000s, there was basically white and black in the District. The whites lived in their neighborhoods west of 16th Street and blacks were on the other side. This was segregation (imposed and self-imposed). There was an "understanding" between white and blacks that involved respect of each others territory and culture. The economic relations were always skewed in favor of whites who employed the local black population for various service-related jobs. But there was a level of social STABILITY between the races.

Starting under the Anthony Williams mayoral administration, there was a concerted effort by the DC government, private real estate developers and banks to shift the white/black and upper-class/poor dynamic for one important purpose: PROFIT. This paved the way for wealthier whites to purchase properties in black neighborhoods and drive up taxes and real estate costs in the communities. In sum, this was a white invasion of historical black neighborhoods in the District. The "understanding" was broken.

The huge influx of Latino immigrants to Adams Morgan and Mount Pleasant added to the disharmony. Asian immigrant families were establishing more shops in predominately black sections of the city. Clearly, DC was no longer just a Black and White City.

4. Well, I kinda miss the hookers on 14th and K Streets. They added some late-night favor in downtown. And I dug the XXX-rated shops near the tourist traps back in the day. All well.

And many of the excellent programs Barry instituted (exampe: the youth summer jobs program) were ended.
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Old 08-02-2010, 02:18 PM
 
1,280 posts, read 1,310,032 times
Reputation: 533
Quote:
Originally Posted by coldbliss View Post
Count me in the minority but I miss the gritty, dark and under-developed era of DC. Reasons why I miss the old DC?

1. As a couple people noted...it was much cheaper to rent and to buy property in many neighborhoods today. In the mid-1990s, I could have staked some property in Logan Circle on a pittance of a salary. Today? Forget about it.

It wasn't unusual for cash-starved college students and artists to rent places near DuPont, Adams Morgan, Columbia Heights, and Capitol Hill. You can struggle with finances and still live in a dump near many amenities such as restaurants, bars, and public transportation. Today? Apartments once inhabited by artists and college students were spruced up and converted into $500,000 condo units. How many students can afford a half-Mil condo?

2. More independent-owned businesses dotted the District back in the day. Restaurants, hardware stores, pharmacies and clothing stores were owned and operated by families. Today? Good luck finding a store that doesn't have a national chain outreach. Part of this transformation is due to escalating rents imposed by property owners during the Boom-Boom years of the late 1990s and early 2000s. Independent shops couldn't afford to renew the leases but a corporate giant like Starbucks could easily swing the rent.

3. Race relations were better before the Big Gentrification. Before the Boom-Boom times of the 1990s and 2000s, there was basically white and black in the District. The whites lived in their neighborhoods west of 16th Street and blacks were on the other side. This was segregation (imposed and self-imposed). There was an "understanding" between white and blacks that involved respect of each others territory and culture. The economic relations were always skewed in favor of whites who employed the local black population for various service-related jobs. But there was a level of social STABILITY between the races.

Starting under the Anthony Williams mayoral administration, there was a concerted effort by the DC government, private real estate developers and banks to shift the white/black and upper-class/poor dynamic for one important purpose: PROFIT. This paved the way for wealthier whites to purchase properties in black neighborhoods and drive up taxes and real estate costs in the communities. In sum, this was a white invasion of historical black neighborhoods in the District. The "understanding" was broken.

The huge influx of Latino immigrants to Adams Morgan and Mount Pleasant added to the disharmony. Asian immigrant families were establishing more shops in predominately black sections of the city. Clearly, DC was no longer just a Black and White City.

4. Well, I kinda miss the hookers on 14th and K Streets. They added some late-night favor in downtown. And I dug the XXX-rated shops near the tourist traps back in the day. All well.
This has to be one of the stupidest posts I've ever seen on this here thingy...

1) "You can struggle with finances and still live in a dump near many amenities such as restaurants, bars, and public transportation. "

Yeah, you also had to deal with crack dealers, hobos, and hookers every time you stepped out of your home. Yeah, I'm pretty sure the real estate agents loved to point out the used condoms every time they showed a property.

2) What's wrong with going to a chain store? Yeah, it would be nice to buy locally but let's face, a lot of times they suck. Poor selection, poor service, and prices are usually higher. And many large retail chains you hate once started out as mom and pop shops.

3) Race relations were better? Is better to you having white people hide in their houses once the sun went down? Once again you have the "White man is trying to keep the black man down" mindset that so many locals here have. Don't even get me started on the historically black neighborhoods part because guess what? Before they were black they were white!!! So what?! Times change, demographics change, you can't claim DC for only black people!

And now you have something against Asian and Latino immigrants? Maybe if the black community would learn to invest and maintain their own neighborhoods they would not have this "invasion" from other sources.

4) You want hookers? Learn to use the internet or Craigslist, it's the 21st century...
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Old 08-02-2010, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Rockville, MD
3,548 posts, read 4,814,941 times
Reputation: 1281
Quote:
Originally Posted by stars99 View Post
And many of the excellent programs Barry instituted (exampe: the youth summer jobs program) were ended.
You mean this one? DOES: Mayor Adrian M. Fenty’s 2010 Summer Youth Employment Program (http://www.does.dc.gov/does/cwp/view,a,1232,q,537757.asp - broken link)
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Old 08-02-2010, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Rockville, MD
3,548 posts, read 4,814,941 times
Reputation: 1281
Quote:
Originally Posted by coldbliss View Post
Count me in the minority but I miss the gritty, dark and under-developed era of DC. Reasons why I miss the old DC?

1. As a couple people noted...it was much cheaper to rent and to buy property in many neighborhoods today. In the mid-1990s, I could have staked some property in Logan Circle on a pittance of a salary. Today? Forget about it.

It wasn't unusual for cash-starved college students and artists to rent places near DuPont, Adams Morgan, Columbia Heights, and Capitol Hill. You can struggle with finances and still live in a dump near many amenities such as restaurants, bars, and public transportation. Today? Apartments once inhabited by artists and college students were spruced up and converted into $500,000 condo units. How many students can afford a half-Mil condo?

2. More independent-owned businesses dotted the District back in the day. Restaurants, hardware stores, pharmacies and clothing stores were owned and operated by families. Today? Good luck finding a store that doesn't have a national chain outreach. Part of this transformation is due to escalating rents imposed by property owners during the Boom-Boom years of the late 1990s and early 2000s. Independent shops couldn't afford to renew the leases but a corporate giant like Starbucks could easily swing the rent.

3. Race relations were better before the Big Gentrification. Before the Boom-Boom times of the 1990s and 2000s, there was basically white and black in the District. The whites lived in their neighborhoods west of 16th Street and blacks were on the other side. This was segregation (imposed and self-imposed). There was an "understanding" between white and blacks that involved respect of each others territory and culture. The economic relations were always skewed in favor of whites who employed the local black population for various service-related jobs. But there was a level of social STABILITY between the races.

Starting under the Anthony Williams mayoral administration, there was a concerted effort by the DC government, private real estate developers and banks to shift the white/black and upper-class/poor dynamic for one important purpose: PROFIT. This paved the way for wealthier whites to purchase properties in black neighborhoods and drive up taxes and real estate costs in the communities. In sum, this was a white invasion of historical black neighborhoods in the District. The "understanding" was broken.

The huge influx of Latino immigrants to Adams Morgan and Mount Pleasant added to the disharmony. Asian immigrant families were establishing more shops in predominately black sections of the city. Clearly, DC was no longer just a Black and White City.

4. Well, I kinda miss the hookers on 14th and K Streets. They added some late-night favor in downtown. And I dug the XXX-rated shops near the tourist traps back in the day. All well.
The city you long for still exists--it's called Baltimore.
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Old 08-02-2010, 02:30 PM
 
9,999 posts, read 8,538,587 times
Reputation: 3544
Quote:
Originally Posted by stars99 View Post
And many of the excellent programs Barry instituted (exampe: the youth summer jobs program) were ended.
Once again, the question must be asked: what are you talking about?

Fenty employs over 18,000 youth in the summer jobs program today.

On the race issue - I gotta actually agree with jsusmc for once. I don't understand why people feel DC is rightfully "black" and everyone else is "invading". Its couple decade status as a majority black city is a drop compared to its overall history. Why is there such a sense of ownership over a city that wasn't majority black until the 1970s? I'm genuinely curious - not trying to be antagoistic.
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Old 08-02-2010, 04:21 PM
 
2,414 posts, read 3,192,651 times
Reputation: 613
Quote:
Originally Posted by 14thandYou View Post
The city you long for still exists--it's called Baltimore.
Well, Fells Point is a better bar scene than U Street
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Old 08-02-2010, 04:31 PM
 
2,414 posts, read 3,192,651 times
Reputation: 613
Quote:
Originally Posted by coldbliss View Post
Count me in the minority but I miss the gritty, dark and under-developed era of DC. Reasons why I miss the old DC?

1. As a couple people noted...it was much cheaper to rent and to buy property in many neighborhoods today. In the mid-1990s, I could have staked some property in Logan Circle on a pittance of a salary. Today? Forget about it.

It wasn't unusual for cash-starved college students and artists to rent places near DuPont, Adams Morgan, Columbia Heights, and Capitol Hill. You can struggle with finances and still live in a dump near many amenities such as restaurants, bars, and public transportation. Today? Apartments once inhabited by artists and college students were spruced up and converted into $500,000 condo units. How many students can afford a half-Mil condo?

2. More independent-owned businesses dotted the District back in the day. Restaurants, hardware stores, pharmacies and clothing stores were owned and operated by families. Today? Good luck finding a store that doesn't have a national chain outreach. Part of this transformation is due to escalating rents imposed by property owners during the Boom-Boom years of the late 1990s and early 2000s. Independent shops couldn't afford to renew the leases but a corporate giant like Starbucks could easily swing the rent.

3. Race relations were better before the Big Gentrification. Before the Boom-Boom times of the 1990s and 2000s, there was basically white and black in the District. The whites lived in their neighborhoods west of 16th Street and blacks were on the other side. This was segregation (imposed and self-imposed). There was an "understanding" between white and blacks that involved respect of each others territory and culture. The economic relations were always skewed in favor of whites who employed the local black population for various service-related jobs. But there was a level of social STABILITY between the races.

Starting under the Anthony Williams mayoral administration, there was a concerted effort by the DC government, private real estate developers and banks to shift the white/black and upper-class/poor dynamic for one important purpose: PROFIT. This paved the way for wealthier whites to purchase properties in black neighborhoods and drive up taxes and real estate costs in the communities. In sum, this was a white invasion of historical black neighborhoods in the District. The "understanding" was broken.

The huge influx of Latino immigrants to Adams Morgan and Mount Pleasant added to the disharmony. Asian immigrant families were establishing more shops in predominately black sections of the city. Clearly, DC was no longer just a Black and White City.

4. Well, I kinda miss the hookers on 14th and K Streets. They added some late-night favor in downtown. And I dug the XXX-rated shops near the tourist traps back in the day. All well.
It seems like much of DC is being overtaken by upwardly mobile credit card crunchers. People cannot now afford to buy homes in the same neighborhoods they grew up in. Fenty's salary is only $145K/year. How can that salary can enable him to live in DC in the high style becoming of a big city mayor.
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Old 08-02-2010, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Columbia Heights, D.C.
331 posts, read 478,583 times
Reputation: 91
I have lived in D.C. all of my life. I'm 20 years old and go the privilege to attend a private school that was very diverse and got to meet people of different backgrounds, however I lived in in Far Northeast in the projects so day to day I was in two different worlds. But I'm glad I did attend private school from K-12 I've made friends with people from everywhere. I'll admit it was strange going to school with people from Bethesda, Potomac, Kensington, Tenlytown, Great Falls, Mclean, etc.. but it taught me a lot. With that said I like the fact that D.C. is being a more diverse city, but at the same time I hope some area maintain its culture and heritage.

I love D.C., born and raised here and seen the best and worst of this city, I hope ting get better and better. But I do disagree with how its being "cleaned up". The police do too much racial profiling in this city. One day me and two of my friends we're at a bus stop at 16th street smoking a cigarette and all of the sudden jump outs pull up and searched us. We didn't even have anything on us. At times I do feel like less than a human in this city. Me and a lot of other people in this city have gone through too much sh*t.
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Old 08-02-2010, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Rockville, MD
3,548 posts, read 4,814,941 times
Reputation: 1281
Quote:
Originally Posted by stars99 View Post
People cannot now afford to buy homes in the same neighborhoods they grew up in.
Not to be callous about it, but who says they should? Cities and neighborhoods change; what once was affordable may no longer be so, and some neighborhoods that used to be out of reach may come down in price. A city is not something trapped in amber, never to be disturbed.

We can't afford to buy in the neighborhoods where my wife grew up either, but I don't see why that should be some kind of birthright.

I know a lot of people who lived in the Logan/U Street area in the 70s and 80s, and not one of them pines for anything from that period. Sure, the homes were affordable, but prostitution and drug dealing were rampant, crime was through the roof, and there were no amenities whatsoever to speak of. Not exactly the golden days of yore.
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Old 08-02-2010, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Rockville, MD
3,548 posts, read 4,814,941 times
Reputation: 1281
Quote:
Originally Posted by stars99 View Post
Well, Fells Point is a better bar scene than U Street
That's because U Street's scene is lounges and clubs, not bars.

And I love Fell's, BTW. I just have no desire to live in Baltimore. But if more affordable homes, exorbitant crime, urban decay, rampant municipal corruption and sky high property taxes are your thing, Baltimore would be happy to have you as a taxpaying resident.
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