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Old 01-16-2011, 04:12 PM
 
33 posts, read 49,470 times
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I lived outside D.C. from 1981-85 and am thinking of moving back. One of the things I missed in the area though was evergreen trees. I've joked that the only evergreen in D.C is the national Christmas tree!, I know that's an exaggeration, but I also know that there simply aren't evergreens there like say in the Pacific Northwest. My question are there good living areas around D.C., especially near Metro stops, with plentiful evergreens? I know this is a good time of year to ask as all the other trees will be rather naked now!
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Old 01-16-2011, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Orange, California
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No, DC does not have a lot of evergreen trees. They are a few, but certainly not an area with a particularly high concentration of conifers. You can't even compare it to the Pacific Northwest in terms of the type of trees. What DC does have is wonderful deciduous trees that bloom out with tons of green for six months of the year, followed by a pretty spectacular fall foilage season.

If you are committed to being in the eastern United States, you might want to look at some of the southern cities, like Atlanta and Charlotte. They both have way more evergreen trees than DC.
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Old 01-17-2011, 09:08 AM
 
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D.C. has more evergreens than Chicago! But no, you won't find a whole forest of them. There are a couple nice rows of them on the cliff sides at Great Falls. Great Falls is a must-see in general if you haven't been there yet.

Another popular D.C. getaway is the Shenandoah National Park, but unfortunately for you that is probably the least evergreen portion of the entire Appalachian chain!

There is hope, though. There are some nice pines (the Southern kind that the previous poster mentioned) near the Chesapeake. The eastern shore is famous locally for its quiet quaint culture and natural charm. I can attest to the number of pines on Kent Island (right by the Bay Bridge); it felt a bit like I was back in the ponderosa forests of Arizona.

For a more distant but somewhat doable getaway, Vermont and New Hampshire are breathtaking and full of evergreens.
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Old 01-17-2011, 09:13 AM
 
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Also, here in Chicago I like to stop by the conifer garden along the outside of the conservatory in my neighborhood. So if you're really desperate, you might see what they have at the U.S. Botanic Garden or the National Arboretum.
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Old 01-23-2011, 09:54 AM
 
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Thanks, sorry for the slow response, I've been distracted by car issues - had to find a new one. Here in FL I can't live without one. My goal for D.C. is to greatly reduce my carbon footprint by having my main transportation be 1. foot, 2. Metro, and 3. Zipcars.

One of the nice things about FL though (like the NW) is that there is abundant green here all year. That was a major thing I missed in winter when I lived in the D.C. area before. Another nice thing here is that cold is in the 50's!!! But not only does this area NOT have outstanding public transportation as D.C. does, it and the NW also don't have the outstanding culture and museums that D.C. does. Plus much more. A big motivator for me is that I hate the sprawl that predominates here, there would be few if ANY places in FL to even contemplate living a good life by choice without a car. I feel I could do that in D.C. I could do that in NYC too, but I like the scale and feel of D.C. much better than NYC.

Goozer you are not only right about a spectacular fall foliage season but I remember Spring being pretty spectacular too, especially with the contrast to Winter without much green. I know that contrast of course helps appreciate each of the seasons more, but I still like green all year!
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Old 01-23-2011, 03:07 PM
 
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For just 1 cent, you can buy a book all about the trees of Washington DC, here Amazon.com: City of Trees: The Complete Field Guide to the Trees of Washington, D.C. (9780801833205): Melanie Choukas-Bradley, Polly Alexander: Books
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Old 01-24-2011, 06:38 AM
 
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Thanks, I was also thinking IF I get a place with a balcony perhaps I could get a potted Douglas Fir or something like that.
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