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Old 02-15-2011, 01:53 PM
 
999 posts, read 1,816,697 times
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National Public Radio has a radio segment this morning about gentrification in the Anacostia district.

D.C., Long 'Chocolate City,' Becoming More Vanilla : NPR

This clip from the article really struck me:

"Charles Wilson, a black lawyer who works for an accounting and consulting firm, went to high school in the Maryland suburbs but bought a home in D.C. in August 2006, just before prices peaked. He's now an elected official active in a number of neighborhood associations.
'Yeah I'm concerned, long term I'm wondering where will my place be within the city," Wilson says. "I'm wondering what the D.C. of tomorrow will look like, and whether I'll still have a seat at the table.'"

If a successful black professional who is active in his community wonders if he has a "seat at the table" in the future, then gentrification becomes an issue beyond the working poor.
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Old 02-15-2011, 06:20 PM
 
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To be fair, the "successful black professional" was not implying he couldn't afford to live there, just wondering if the culture he relates to would be there in the future

Also, Adams in that story turned down buying a 2-bedroom for $285k in order to buy a 5-bedroom in Maryland. What a great problem to have! I wish I could have that much freedom of choice in my housing options.

I still don't get what the solution is. As someone who's priced out of the much of the city myself, I guess I was never raised to believe that I deserved to live somewhere simply because I lived there before. I'm priced out of where I grew up and have no expectation otherwise. Never even crossed my mind to complain about it. I just go where I can afford and the world keeps turning.

Last edited by Bluefly; 02-15-2011 at 06:53 PM..
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Old 02-15-2011, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, VA
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I like the new changes, and the ones to come.
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Old 02-15-2011, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Maryland
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Considering how places like MoCo are being overrun by Hispanics the Whites have to go somewhere. It's like musical chairs.
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Old 02-15-2011, 10:17 PM
 
3,210 posts, read 8,487,764 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coldbliss View Post
If a successful black professional who is active in his community wonders if he has a "seat at the table" in the future, then gentrification becomes an issue beyond the working poor.
The guy is a successful black professional in a 98% black area that is just now getting its first actual sit down restaurant. Something tells me he doesn't have to worry about being pushed out. It's like a rich, white guy in Great Falls wondering if he's going to be pushed out because the Latino population in Fairfax County is growing.

One overreaction does not an issue make.
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Old 02-16-2011, 07:49 AM
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690 posts, read 1,709,133 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coldbliss View Post
National Public Radio has a radio segment this morning about gentrification in the Anacostia district.

D.C., Long 'Chocolate City,' Becoming More Vanilla : NPR

This clip from the article really struck me:

"Charles Wilson, a black lawyer who works for an accounting and consulting firm, went to high school in the Maryland suburbs but bought a home in D.C. in August 2006, just before prices peaked. He's now an elected official active in a number of neighborhood associations.
'Yeah I'm concerned, long term I'm wondering where will my place be within the city," Wilson says. "I'm wondering what the D.C. of tomorrow will look like, and whether I'll still have a seat at the table.'"

If a successful black professional who is active in his community wonders if he has a "seat at the table" in the future, then gentrification becomes an issue beyond the working poor.
you need look no further than what has happened in brooklyn and harlem new york. prior to gentrification, non blacks and italians wouldn't think twice about moving to those areas, post gentrification they are all the rage. it all starts with a coffee shop, then a bakery, you get the point.

what is sad is that the very thing that drew the first "urban pioneers" to move into those areas, are the very things that move will eventually replace.

one thing that bothers me about the term gentrification is that it is almost always tied to where white people choose to move to. i'm not trying to make this into a racial post but it's the truth.

you very seldom if ever hear that term applied to where other minorities move to. 10 $100k minority families move to an all white neighborhood and it's "oh there goes our neighborhood", 10 $100k white families move to a minority neighborhood and it's "up and coming, new hot area, gentrification, etc.".

Gentrification: A Not-So-Subtle Racism | Providence Daily Dose

i remember reading that article for the first time and it really made me start thinking about how we coin what gentrification is and if it is necessarily a good or bad thing.

i'm a rental property owner so on one hand, i'm all for capitalism but other hand i am a minority and i have experienced the other side of gentrification as well.

most times as minorities our identities are tied to our communities i guess so i can see where mr. wilson was coming from.
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Old 02-16-2011, 07:55 AM
 
Location: DC
6,840 posts, read 7,017,024 times
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Population demographics change. White to black in the 60s. Black to mixed in the 21st century. The city doesn't belong to any one group. The poor will always be pushed around from place to place, and while that's sad sometimes I don't think you can fix it. Overall the capital being invested in the city to support gentrification is a good thing. Washington's a heck of a lot better place to live than Detroit.
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Old 02-16-2011, 09:04 AM
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690 posts, read 1,709,133 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DCforever View Post
Population demographics change. White to black in the 60s. Black to mixed in the 21st century. The city doesn't belong to any one group. The poor will always be pushed around from place to place, and while that's sad sometimes I don't think you can fix it. Overall the capital being invested in the city to support gentrification is a good thing. Washington's a heck of a lot better place to live than Detroit.
still doesn't deal with the problem. poor people don't just disappear off of the face of the earth. they relocate somewhere else. shelter and food are basic human needs. the reality is that there will never be 100% employment in america. never. everyone can't live the american dream. capitalism at it's core means someone loses and someone gains.
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Old 02-16-2011, 09:07 AM
 
999 posts, read 1,816,697 times
Reputation: 1179
Excellent post!

Quote:
Originally Posted by (-) View Post
you need look no further than what has happened in brooklyn and harlem new york. prior to gentrification, non blacks and italians wouldn't think twice about moving to those areas, post gentrification they are all the rage. it all starts with a coffee shop, then a bakery, you get the point.

what is sad is that the very thing that drew the first "urban pioneers" to move into those areas, are the very things that move will eventually replace.

one thing that bothers me about the term gentrification is that it is almost always tied to where white people choose to move to. i'm not trying to make this into a racial post but it's the truth.

you very seldom if ever hear that term applied to where other minorities move to. 10 $100k minority families move to an all white neighborhood and it's "oh there goes our neighborhood", 10 $100k white families move to a minority neighborhood and it's "up and coming, new hot area, gentrification, etc.".

Gentrification: A Not-So-Subtle Racism | Providence Daily Dose

i remember reading that article for the first time and it really made me start thinking about how we coin what gentrification is and if it is necessarily a good or bad thing.

i'm a rental property owner so on one hand, i'm all for capitalism but other hand i am a minority and i have experienced the other side of gentrification as well.

most times as minorities our identities are tied to our communities i guess so i can see where mr. wilson was coming from.
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Old 02-16-2011, 09:32 AM
 
Location: DC
6,840 posts, read 7,017,024 times
Reputation: 3503
Quote:
Originally Posted by (-) View Post
still doesn't deal with the problem. poor people don't just disappear off of the face of the earth. they relocate somewhere else. shelter and food are basic human needs. the reality is that there will never be 100% employment in america. never. everyone can't live the american dream. capitalism at it's core means someone loses and someone gains.
Gentrification alone doesn't change the quantity of housing stock, so the poor move to decaying neighborhoods while the affluent move to the up and coming neighborhoods. I'm in favor of the current approach to housing for the poor and think we should do more, but gentrification isn't the problem. The poor need decent places to live.

Capitalism is the tide that lifts all boats. It's a positive sum game.
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