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Old 09-26-2015, 10:33 AM
 
2,696 posts, read 1,717,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Infinite_heights77 View Post
You're more optimistic than me. Until Baltimore deals with the concentrated sources of hardcore Black poverty and social dysfunction, the city WILL NEVER flourish as it should.
Cities flourish because they are in a position to take full advantage of current economic and social trends. This is why places like DC, San Francisco, NYC and Houston are booming right now. These cities are all in a position to take advantage of the current economical, cultural and social trends. Baltimore is not in that position and is not currently able to be. So it will continue to suffer.

If you look at history, this has always been what determines a city's vitality. When the automobile industry was in full swing nationally, Detroit took full advantage and boomed as a result. But Detroit is in no position to take advantage of today's more white collar, knowledge/entertainment/technology based national economy like other cities.

Baltimore does not have the tools to thrive in the current climate. There is no reason for the people and businesses that are driving today's economy and culture to be drawn to Baltimore. So Baltimore will suffer until either the climate changes or it changes.
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Old 09-26-2015, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Prince George's County, Maryland
6,212 posts, read 7,037,521 times
Reputation: 2581
Quote:
Originally Posted by pwduvall View Post
The riots themselves didn't cause any significant physical damage to the city as a whole. The problem is that when you add the riots on top of the city's weak (nonexistent?) political leadership and the city's preexisting terrible reputation, you end up in a box that will be hard to get out of.

DC folks know all too well that perception is reality. And the current perception of Baltimore couldn't be worse. That is why people on the Detroit and Cleveland boards feel comfortable disparaging Baltimore in comparison to their home towns. This is their rare opportunity for them to bask in relative sunshine.
Eye personally think Baltimore does have it takes to be a pretty dynamic and even formidable player on the East Coast, it has the foundations and the blueprint to make it happen. The leadership has to change because it seems like they are one of the main reasons that Baltimore's true potential hasn't been resurrected yet. Plus, the leadership is too focused on the Inner Harbor and the waterfront neighborhoods. They're just as much a part of Baltimore as the rest of the neighborhoods who don't border the Bay but if they can focus more on the rest of the neighborhoods, then Baltimore in its entirety can be a crown jewel, not just the Inner Harbor area. DC and LA are no strangers to riots, Bmore may be able to recover in several years but obviously there are different dynamics in DC and LA that has made them recover more smoothly from their riots than what Bmore has to deal with going forward. The crime rate in Baltimore can be rather unsettling and some of its more nicer neighborhoods such as Mount Vernon and Charles Village have experienced recent crime upticks as well. Though it may err the need of caution of one's surroundings, Charles Village and Mount Vernon still look like neighborhoods Eye would thoroughly enjoy hanging out in and even living in should Eye ever relocate to Bmore or transfer to school up there for a couple of years. The Shaw neighborhood in DC for example has recently experienced an uptick in crime too but that sure as hell isn't gonna stop me from enjoying one of my most favorite neighborhoods in DC. Yes, everyone's different particularly with comfort level but I'm a cautious optimist And Eye say this as someone who grew up in the 'burbs (PG County, albeit the more working class and rougher parts of the county so that might skew things a little bit) who's constantly aware of the beauty and warts of city life.

My statement may seem rather simple but Eye honestly do think Bmore will turn out fine in the end once it gets its act together and I'm wishing it the best of luck in its future. Perhaps Bmore could look at how Pittsburgh has steadily transitioned its economy into a multifaceted system following the closure of most of the city's heavy industry.
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Old 09-27-2015, 05:36 AM
 
1,589 posts, read 880,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by halfamazing View Post
Holy cow chriz, you must of had a rough day fighting papal traffic today...
Papal traffic? It was like a ghost town out there.
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Old 09-27-2015, 06:05 AM
 
1,589 posts, read 880,471 times
Reputation: 1084
Quote:
Originally Posted by DistrictSonic View Post
DC actually turned itself around after a riot in 1991, the Mt. Pleasant riot.
Well, the chronology fits, and police harassment of Latinos did decline. But Home Rule and Metro did a lot more to help turn the city around.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DistrictSonic View Post
Oddly enough, that was also an instance of police violence, but with a black cop and a latino man.
A rookie black female cop who exhibited some poor decision-making with regard to public drunkenness in a Latino community on the evening of Cinco de Mayo.
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Old 09-27-2015, 06:16 AM
 
1,589 posts, read 880,471 times
Reputation: 1084
Quote:
Originally Posted by Infinite_heights77 View Post
You're more optimistic than me. Until Baltimore deals with the concentrated sources of hardcore Black poverty and social dysfunction, the city WILL NEVER flourish as it should.
Poverty and dysfunction are results, not actions. These things have been put upon the communities that have them to deal with.
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Old 09-27-2015, 03:55 PM
 
1,202 posts, read 907,147 times
Reputation: 685
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcave360 View Post
Eye personally think Baltimore does have it takes to be a pretty dynamic and even formidable player on the East Coast, it has the foundations and the blueprint to make it happen. The leadership has to change because it seems like they are one of the main reasons that Baltimore's true potential hasn't been resurrected yet. Plus, the leadership is too focused on the Inner Harbor and the waterfront neighborhoods. They're just as much a part of Baltimore as the rest of the neighborhoods who don't border the Bay but if they can focus more on the rest of the neighborhoods, then Baltimore in its entirety can be a crown jewel, not just the Inner Harbor area. DC and LA are no strangers to riots, Bmore may be able to recover in several years but obviously there are different dynamics in DC and LA that has made them recover more smoothly from their riots than what Bmore has to deal with going forward. The crime rate in Baltimore can be rather unsettling and some of its more nicer neighborhoods such as Mount Vernon and Charles Village have experienced recent crime upticks as well. Though it may err the need of caution of one's surroundings, Charles Village and Mount Vernon still look like neighborhoods Eye would thoroughly enjoy hanging out in and even living in should Eye ever relocate to Bmore or transfer to school up there for a couple of years. The Shaw neighborhood in DC for example has recently experienced an uptick in crime too but that sure as hell isn't gonna stop me from enjoying one of my most favorite neighborhoods in DC. Yes, everyone's different particularly with comfort level but I'm a cautious optimist And Eye say this as someone who grew up in the 'burbs (PG County, albeit the more working class and rougher parts of the county so that might skew things a little bit) who's constantly aware of the beauty and warts of city life.

My statement may seem rather simple but Eye honestly do think Bmore will turn out fine in the end once it gets its act together and I'm wishing it the best of luck in its future. Perhaps Bmore could look at how Pittsburgh has steadily transitioned its economy into a multifaceted system following the closure of most of the city's heavy industry.
You are so right about Pittsburgh. I listened to a presentation by a former Mayor of Pittsburgh. He talked about locking up all sorts of undervalued real estate for future redevelopment.

Here in Baltimore, SRB is the least visionary mayor imaginable. I hate to think about the opportunities that have gotten past us over the past five years. Folks in community development (like I am) know that the current city government is an obstacle at best. On the other hand, we hear that folks in the poorest neighborhoods don't want any real economic development because they are afraid of gentrification. Perhaps the administration is trying to keep that slice of the population happy.
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Old 09-27-2015, 04:25 PM
 
1,202 posts, read 907,147 times
Reputation: 685
Quote:
Originally Posted by pwduvall View Post
The riots themselves didn't cause any significant physical damage to the city as a whole. The problem is that when you add the riots on top of the city's weak (nonexistent?) political leadership and the city's preexisting terrible reputation, you end up in a box that will be hard to get out of.

DC folks know all too well that perception is reality. And the current perception of Baltimore couldn't be worse. That is why people on the Detroit and Cleveland boards feel comfortable disparaging Baltimore in comparison to their home towns. This is their rare opportunity for them to bask in relative sunshine.
As luck would have it there is an article in today's Sun about what it would cost to buy as much negative advertising as Baltimore received during the riots. The estimate was $100-200 million just for the major cable channels. Then they pointed out the estimate does not include other US channels and foreign coverage. Realistically though, you can't buy that kind of negative publicity for any price.
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Old 09-28-2015, 07:51 AM
 
1,589 posts, read 880,471 times
Reputation: 1084
Well, the media busies itself in creating bad press for everywhere. Baltimore should not feel singled out in this. But concerns over the effects of gentrification can hardly be dismissed. Some of these folks after all used to live in DC and were pushed northward by gentrification. The idea of "not again" is an understandable one.
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Old 09-28-2015, 11:51 AM
 
365 posts, read 282,789 times
Reputation: 429
Just want to chime in with another DC/Bmore Texas comparison as someone from the DC / maryland area originally who made the move to Austin, TX. I find a lot of similarity in the comparison of DC and Baltimore with the comparison of Austin and San Antonio. Austin is the newer, white collar, political, technology center and San Antonio is the older, blue collar / military, older downtown, established city. SA is about an hour south of Austin on a major interstate, very similar climate and landscape. San Antonio is a fast growing city without a lot of the problems of Baltimore but I've always felt there was a comparison to be made. Even the area around the Alamo and Riverwalk feels like the inner harbor to me, touristy, a bit underwhelming and someplace you don't want to stray from too far lest you run into some "interesting" locals.
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Old 09-28-2015, 02:44 PM
 
1,202 posts, read 907,147 times
Reputation: 685
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reynard32 View Post
Well, the media busies itself in creating bad press for everywhere. Baltimore should not feel singled out in this. But concerns over the effects of gentrification can hardly be dismissed. Some of these folks after all used to live in DC and were pushed northward by gentrification. The idea of "not again" is an understandable one.
Understandable... but there is also a problem with physical deterioration and eventual collapse of the buildings. The hard choice is having to move because richer folks move in and fix up area houses (driving up rents) or having to move because the roof of the rowhouse next door caves in and water starts to flow into your house (or your house becomes structurally unsound.)

Money will need to spent on these buildings at some point or they will cease to exist. The trend line is toward oblivion. Gentrification is one way to change the trend. Are there other workable solutions?
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