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Old 10-18-2011, 09:51 AM
 
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Hi!

I'm renting a building and had a question related to how the landlord is calculating their total rent.

When I did my numbers, I took the total interior area of the building -- the length multiplied by the width which gave me, lets say, 2000 sqft.

But they came back and said no, its actually 2600 sqft because of the fire escape.

I cant find where in the DCRA it says what is used to calculate that number -- can anyone point me in the right direction? I'm going to negotiate with them soon, so I'd like to know if I have a legal leg to stand on...

Thank you!!
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Old 10-18-2011, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC
2,010 posts, read 3,028,140 times
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For the purposes of reporting residential square footage, you typically only include spaces intended for human occupancy. Things like open areas, unheated garages, crawl spaces etc, do not count. A fire escape certainly wouldn't count.

I don't believe it would count if it were commercial either. My firm leases two floors of an office building on a $/sqft basis. The lower floor is completely enclosed; something like 18,000 sqft. Our upper floor sits on the same basic foot print, except we have two enormous balconies that take up 4,000 sqft or so. So even though we have the use of 36,000 square feet, we only pay for the finished 32,000.

There are ANSI/BOMA standards for measuring that you could point to, but they differ depending on the building type. The official guidance document costs $, but you can usually find an old version posted online, or states often summarize them. You really need to dive into DC's codes to be certain of the rules here though.
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