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Old 03-25-2012, 12:13 PM
 
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I read stories of Adams-Morgan being one of the prime areas to live/hang out back in the 1990s. I have heard it described as the Greenwich Village or Height-Ashbury of DC, lots of lively street life,ethnic restaurants, shops.

Was it actually like this at one point or is this just false nostalgia based on how run down the rest of the city was at that point?

Every time I go to A-M before 9 pm it always seems pretty dead. Not much of a vibe, little foot traffic, mostly just bars and related junk food places, little shopping or people watching. Wondering if the growth of Penn Quarter, 14th Street, Columbia Heights, even Barracks Row are eating into A-M leaving the rump of a dive bar district.
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Old 03-25-2012, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
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Eh, it's *always* been dead before nightfall, especially during the work week.
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Old 03-25-2012, 02:11 PM
 
447 posts, read 564,258 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RickOrz View Post
I read stories of Adams-Morgan being one of the prime areas to live/hang out back in the 1990s. I have heard it described as the Greenwich Village or Height-Ashbury of DC, lots of lively street life,ethnic restaurants, shops.

Was it actually like this at one point or is this just false nostalgia based on how run down the rest of the city was at that point?

Every time I go to A-M before 9 pm it always seems pretty dead. Not much of a vibe, little foot traffic, mostly just bars and related junk food places, little shopping or people watching. Wondering if the growth of Penn Quarter, 14th Street, Columbia Heights, even Barracks Row are eating into A-M leaving the rump of a dive bar district.
DC is changing. In the 90s, there weren't may neighborhoods where you could safely spend an evening dining, drinking, and strolling. U Street and H Street were both still burnt-out from the 1968 riots, Penn Quarter/Chiantown pre-1997 was filled with drugs and prostitutes, Columbia Heights was unsafe. There are so many other good areas in DC now, so naturally people are spending less time in Adams Morgan when there's so many other places to go. Twenty years ago, you had Adams Morgan and Georgetown, and that was about it.
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Old 03-25-2012, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
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I think what might turn *some* people off about Adams Morgan is the horrific lack of parking and a metro stop that's a bit of a hike away from the action. When you're in college or a 20-something it's not as big of a deal but as you start to outgrow that type of lifestyle, you realize it's not worth the hassle just to hit up a strip of dive bars and be packed in like sardines.
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Old 03-25-2012, 02:46 PM
 
89 posts, read 132,663 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curbed Enthusiasm View Post
DC is changing. In the 90s, there weren't may neighborhoods where you could safely spend an evening dining, drinking, and strolling. U Street and H Street were both still burnt-out from the 1968 riots, Penn Quarter/Chiantown pre-1997 was filled with drugs and prostitutes, Columbia Heights was unsafe. There are so many other good areas in DC now, so naturally people are spending less time in Adams Morgan when there's so many other places to go. Twenty years ago, you had Adams Morgan and Georgetown, and that was about it.
Exactly, I remember those areas before gentrification swept through the city and it wasn't too pretty. People new to the area can't even imagine what Chinatown was like a mere 10-15 years ago...But I think Adams Morgan's decline can also be tied to the metro station. When I was in college, I didn't mind that walk from the metro over to the bars/the dinner, but now, I'd rather just catch the metro and hang out downtown or around U street, where the walk is significantly shorter...
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Old 03-25-2012, 08:21 PM
 
80 posts, read 92,795 times
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Originally Posted by user8 View Post
I think what might turn *some* people off about Adams Morgan is the horrific lack of parking and a metro stop that's a bit of a hike away from the action. When you're in college or a 20-something it's not as big of a deal but as you start to outgrow that type of lifestyle, you realize it's not worth the hassle just to hit up a strip of dive bars and be packed in like sardines.
This is why I rarely visit Adams Morgan.
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Old 03-25-2012, 10:40 PM
 
Location: Standing outside of heaven, wating for God to come and get me.
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I absolutely detest commuting to Adam's Morgan. No parking, no metro...
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Old 03-26-2012, 07:52 AM
 
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I think AM is less attractive as a nightlife destination than it was 25 years ago, for the reasons mentioned, but the residential areas west of 18th are nicer. There are few buildings that have gone into disrepair and an ever-increasing number of row houses and apartments that have been fixed up. For people who want a bourgie urban lifestyle, it's very attractive, so long as you keep away from the troublemakers on Saturday night and don't mind the smell of puke too much on Sunday morning.

So I'd be more inclined to say it evolved than that it declined. But, having lived there years ago, I'll always have a soft spot for the era when AM was a place to be discovered.
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Old 03-26-2012, 08:05 AM
 
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Its like a ten minute walk from Woodley Park to the heart of Adams Morgan. Does ten minutes really qualify as "no metro?" I think its easy and actually quite nice to walk over that bridge in nice weather.
I also don't know what you guys mean by no parking. I have always been able to find a spot on some side street, with the exception being on Friday or Saturday nights. But if you are going to Adams Morgan at that time, you probably don't want to be driving anyway.
I agree that Adams Morgan is in decline, but it is not due to transportation. H St is much harder to get to and it is on the rise. I think that, as was previously stated, new destinations are drawing people away from Adams Morgan.
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Old 03-26-2012, 09:30 AM
 
Location: USA
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not the rent.
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