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Old 09-10-2009, 07:04 PM
 
9,999 posts, read 8,829,655 times
Reputation: 3545

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The problem isn't your opinion, it's extrapolating your experience to make a blanket statement about the region. A wise man once said something about intyolerance of others' opinions being a bad sign.

Anyway,
hope you got your pent up rage off your chest in those 3 posts for this medium-sized town (or 8th largest metro in the country).

Good luck in your new home. Hope you like it better.
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Old 09-10-2009, 08:14 PM
 
Location: Rockville, MD
3,548 posts, read 4,980,120 times
Reputation: 1283
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greetings100 View Post
This mostly emanates from a crass, bad attitude among people here that I''ve found unusually pervasive for a medium-sized town. Not much redeeming to counter that major problem... Well I'm glad that the original poster began this thread - as you can see many agreed with him - the town is simply soul-less. Take care now.
You make comments like this and complain about people in DC having a "bad attitude"? Methinks the problem may be with you.
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Old 09-11-2009, 12:00 PM
 
367 posts, read 420,874 times
Reputation: 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by 14thandYou View Post
You make comments like this and complain about people in DC having a "bad attitude"? Methinks the problem may be with you.
As I said, I think personal issues are very common among those who are so ridiculously negative.
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Old 09-11-2009, 12:03 PM
 
367 posts, read 420,874 times
Reputation: 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greetings100 View Post
So anyway, as I was saying: newcomers interested in the general atmosphere of this area, caveat emptor... my experience is that the town gets a major thumbs-down. This mostly emanates from a crass, bad attitude among people here that I''ve found unusually pervasive for a medium-sized town. Not much redeeming to counter that major problem... Well I'm glad that the original poster began this thread - as you can see many agreed with him - the town is simply soul-less. Take care now.
It might help if you got into more specifics instead of speaking in such general terms.


I'm guessing you did some kind of Google search which turned up this thread and you signed up with this board with the soul intent of bringing this thread back even though its been dormant for 6 months.

Either that or you're just a troll.
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Old 09-17-2009, 02:22 AM
 
13 posts, read 33,690 times
Reputation: 23
It sounds like the D.C. metro area is not for you. I was born in D.C. and lived here until my mid-twenties, when my husband's military job took us around the country. Let me tell you, after many years experiencing other places, I couldn't get back to D.C. fast enough. I thought it would be interesting to live in such drastically different places and I, too, was tired of the hectic D.C. pace. But I hated living in small or rural areas with uneducated people, terrible salaries, and little to no culture. But some people's dream is to live on a farm or in the desert, mountains, etc. So maybe you should just bite the bullet and relocate. It's a pain, but sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do. I ended up wishing I was back in D.C. and ended up loathing both CA and TX with the fiery passion of 1,000 red hot burning suns. If you loathe the D.C. area so much, just cut your losses and escape. You'll feel much better once it's over with.
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Old 09-23-2009, 12:48 AM
 
Location: Denver
90 posts, read 252,450 times
Reputation: 100
Southerners don't belong in metro Maryland unless they're ready to become Easterners. If you haven't made that decision, it's time to go back to where you belong. And I don't mean that insultingly. I probably couldn't stand living in the south (seeing as how I can barely stand living in boring-ass Denver which is more progressive than the South). Some people just don't belong in certain areas. If you're wired into a certain culture, join that culture. Maryland is a great place for me because I'm a Marylander at heart. Texas may just be a great place for you too.
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Old 09-23-2009, 12:38 PM
 
1,578 posts, read 2,389,319 times
Reputation: 1400
Quote:
Originally Posted by cory81 View Post
Southerners don't belong in metro Maryland unless they're ready to become Easterners. If you haven't made that decision, it's time to go back to where you belong. And I don't mean that insultingly. I probably couldn't stand living in the south (seeing as how I can barely stand living in boring-ass Denver which is more progressive than the South). Some people just don't belong in certain areas. If you're wired into a certain culture, join that culture. Maryland is a great place for me because I'm a Marylander at heart. Texas may just be a great place for you too.
That's one side to it, but there are people who have lived in Maryland for a long time, but for some reason, are socially restricted and excluded from being seen as fellow "Marylanders" from all of the state's subcultures (Eastern Shore, Baltimore, Panhandle, pseudo-Northeast MoCo, pseudo-NE/SE-DC PG County), are turned off by their pushy, arrogant, and prejudiced attitudes most Marylanders uniformly have, or are beyond aggravated that only the extremely rich and extremely poor(lazy) are given a good standard of living in this state. I realize that I don't belong in Maryland, but the economy is still crap at this moment, not the ideal situation for a recent college graduate to just pack up his bags, relocate to a place 3000 miles away, and be guaranteed a job. But it's really pathetic that it's taking this long to find a decent entry-level job in your city that pays enough so I can at least pack up and reside in the more tolerable Northern Virginia (which btw are completely refreshing compared to suburban Maryland). Hell, I was born in the District and share almost no cultural connection and camaraderie with the DC Natives every time I visit the "authentically DC" neighborhoods. A lot of people say I would fit in very well in the Western states, and with the attitude I have with a lot of things, I would heavily concur.

If you really want, we can swap places. I would give nearly anything to live in such a relaxed, tranquil, laid-back, integrated place like Denver.
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Old 07-14-2012, 07:09 PM
 
1 posts, read 513 times
Reputation: 18
I have to add my voice to the posts here. I've been here two years now...I moved from So. Cal (Newport Beach) to take a job with the Federal Govt. I loved California and had many friends there. I long to go back, but having a stable job really speaks volumes in this economy. California's economy crashed, so there are a lot of us refugees from California out here. After the friendliness of California, I find people in D.C. to be incredibly selfish, uptight, self important, and cold. Really, what do they have to be so self-absorbed about? I knew many wealthy and semi-famous people in California who put themselves out to help others. Many were personal friends of mine. They loved to play and didn't take themselves too seriously. They smile at strangers. I've been here two years now, and I thought I would eventually settle in. But that hasn't happened. I have no friends, which is strange seeing how easily I've made friends every other place I've lived. The only friends I had here were from the Mid West, and they went home after not being able to make friends either.

I would advise against moving here if at all possible.
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Old 07-14-2012, 08:09 PM
 
1,783 posts, read 2,076,542 times
Reputation: 1347
^Well I've been here one year and some change and have the complete opposite impression as you. I find people here may be self important but generally open minded and friendly, especially once you get to know them. Heck when I moved from Arlington to DC I had a whole crew offer to help me move. It's a big city so there will be unpleasant folks that you come across, you just have to move on and spend time with the fun, positive ones.

While I won't say this applies to all people who don't like dc, I will say that I know quite a few people who don't like it here. And one thing each one of those people have in common is that they are egotistical, self-absorbed people themselves. My theory is that they are used to feeling superior to others (big fish in a small pond so to speak) and they resent being in a place full of people who are more accomplished and confident in themselves. I've always been really chill and go with the flow so I don't let others bother me. I think really minimizing your contact with fussy, negative people can do a lot for your own happiness.
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Old 07-15-2012, 12:28 PM
 
869 posts, read 940,389 times
Reputation: 979
My roommate told me that she is heading back to Chicago. She lived here for two years. She has a stable and decent-paying job in the DC area. But she is moving back to the Midwest because she cannot stand the self-absorbed, hyper-calculating 20-somethings who live here. She told me that she no trouble making new friends in the suburbs of Chicago...but here--not a chance. The cost of living and traffic conditions are bothersome too.

And the thing is...I could not argue with her because I know where she is coming from.

The only thing, THE ONLY thing, that attracts people to the Washington, DC area is the job market. You have nothing but crappy job opportunities for college graduates in Los Angeles, Chicago, Cincinnati, Minneapolis or wherever else. When you are looking at $100s/month in student loan bills and you have nothing but hourly wage jobs offered to you, people will tell you to pack up your junk and drive the U-Haul to Washington, DC because it is the ONLY major metropolitan region that offers the most professional opportunities for 20-something university grads. Any parent who reads the news understands that the federal government is a jobs-making machine for all economic sectors and he is going to tell his kid that where is the "gold" lies.

And how many of these new arrivals stick around in the long term? Some like it here enough to build a professional career and perhaps buy some real estate (if they make serious $$$$$). But I come across way too many broken dreams and dashed expectations from 20-something people. It sounds like a sappy line from a Hollywood story in Los Angeles but the situation fits in DC perfectly.
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