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Old 01-20-2008, 10:00 PM
 
1 posts, read 10,702 times
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I know this is a very broad category, but could someone give me an idea what the starting salary for a consulting job (Goverment contracting work) would pay. I currently live in Pittsburgh and work in the retail investment business and considering relocating.

Just trying to see if the pay makes up for the cost of living increase. Thanks.
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Old 01-21-2008, 04:19 PM
 
32 posts, read 137,786 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imk814 View Post
I know this is a very broad category, but could someone give me an idea what the starting salary for a consulting job (Goverment contracting work) would pay. I currently live in Pittsburgh and work in the retail investment business and considering relocating.

Just trying to see if the pay makes up for the cost of living increase. Thanks.
Sorry, but consulting is too broad, even with the govt specification. That could mean management, IT, etc. That said, consulting can pay pretty well vs. most jobs as the government is always looking for ways to waste money.

Most of the best consulting jobs with the major agencies either go to big integrators/firms or to former employees. After many government employees retire, they come back for 2x the pay for the same job, so it can be hard to break in to certain kinds of consulting.

Do yourself a favor and find a real job. Consulting is a terrible life. Further, consultants are one of the lowest forms of life in this region next to lawyers and insurance companies.

For the record, yes, I am a consultant so I can attest and I can't wait until I'm done with it forever.
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Old 01-07-2011, 09:59 AM
 
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what about salaries for consultants who provide strategy and access for small to medium consulting firms in metro dc?
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Old 01-07-2011, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Maryland
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glassdoor.com
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Old 01-12-2011, 06:08 PM
 
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I am graduating from college and was offered $60,000 for health care consulting and $55,000 for sales/retail consulting. I've talked to a lot of people that are young consultants and they've said that in DC, somewhere in the 50,000 range is normal for federal consultants and somewhere around 60,000 for private industry consultants. It depends a lot on the firm though (the person that gave me these figures has worked for Booz Allen and Deloitte). Hope this helps!
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Old 01-12-2011, 06:21 PM
 
561 posts, read 1,382,975 times
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Originally Posted by CollegeGrad2011 View Post
I am graduating from college and was offered $60,000 for health care consulting and $55,000 for sales/retail consulting. I've talked to a lot of people that are young consultants and they've said that in DC, somewhere in the 50,000 range is normal for federal consultants and somewhere around 60,000 for private industry consultants. It depends a lot on the firm though (the person that gave me these figures has worked for Booz Allen and Deloitte). Hope this helps!
That's the ballpark, but be prepared to work some long, long hours.
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Old 01-12-2011, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
4,489 posts, read 10,038,330 times
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Originally Posted by RyanZ View Post
That's the ballpark, but be prepared to work some long, long hours.
Yup...as an IT consultant for one of the "big name" firms, I regularly put in 70+ hour weeks, mandatory weekends, not allowed to travel for holidays, etc. They tell you it's awesome and they give you 5 weeks of vacation, but in my almost 4 years I've been lucky to take 2-3 of those 5 weeks each year.

That said, if you're ready and willing to put in the hours, it's a great starting point for a career. I've seen a LOT in those 4 years, and having the company name on my resume is a great foot-in-the-door when I am looking for other jobs. I've also met some of the smartest, most driven people I've ever known working there.

If you want to play kickball in the evenings and have regular date nights with your SO, consulting's not the gig. But if you want to set aside the first few years of your career to learning a zillion things and boosting your resume as quickly as possible, it's a great industry.
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Old 01-12-2011, 10:20 PM
 
Location: Marshall-Shadeland, Pittsburgh, PA
31,438 posts, read 70,442,747 times
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What's with all of these inquiries lately from Pittsburghers wanting to know about DC salaries? As someone who lived near DC and now lives in Pittsburgh I can safely say that (with few exceptions) your salary bump by moving from Pittsburgh to DC will be fully devoured by the much higher cost-of-living. In some cases, depending on the salary bump, you may end up with a lower standard of living by relocating.

I was earning in the $40k/year range when I lived near DC and worked as an auditor. Meanwhile I had a friend in Pittsburgh who was earning $50k/year. I was paying $1,200/month for a no-frills 1-BR apartment in the sterile suburbs of NoVA. Here in Pittsburgh I pay $550/month for an upscale 1-BR loft walking distance from Downtown with exposed brick, a fenced yard, hardwood flooring, a chandelier, high ceilings, etc. I make half the salary here in Pittsburgh, but my standard of living has marginally improved.

I'm not trying to dissaude people from Pittsburgh from moving to DC; however, I'm irked at how many think "Why not move to DC if I can make $50,000 instead of $40,000?" Why not do it? How about your quality-of-life will go into the toilet for taking such a small salary bump. A unit like the one I currently rent would cost at least $1,500/month in NoVA. That's an extra $12,000/year, roughly, from what I'm paying now annually in Pittsburgh. So if I'm making $40,000 in Pittsburgh, I'd need to make at least $52,000/year in DC to start (not factoring in other more expensive items).
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