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View Poll Results: Does the prospect of Greater Washington DC-Baltimore becoming a megacity concern you?
Yes; the issues like traffic, congestion, lack of infrastructure, and other things bother me 4 11.43%
No; I see the benefits of gaining more amenities, brands, retail options, infill, services, and increased diversity as a plus to it all 24 68.57%
I don't know much about megacities and the issues presented to cities of that size 3 8.57%
Other 4 11.43%
Voters: 35. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-10-2016, 12:17 PM
 
4,945 posts, read 8,266,499 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriz Brown View Post
DC is not majority black. Not as of 2016 anyway.
DC is 46% black and 40% white homey.
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Old 08-10-2016, 07:31 PM
 
Location: New York City
1,219 posts, read 970,272 times
Reputation: 994
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bfrom73 View Post
I had a white middle school teacher that grew up in Anacostia.....
This isn't 1964....
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Old 08-11-2016, 05:56 AM
 
116 posts, read 82,735 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nonsence View Post
This isn't 1964....
Right....but you missed the point.....You were trying to imply that DC was always just a place with upper class rich whites and bourgeois blacks and that's a fallacy.
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Old 08-11-2016, 06:32 AM
 
Location: New York City
1,219 posts, read 970,272 times
Reputation: 994
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bfrom73 View Post
Right....but you missed the point.....You were trying to imply that DC was always just a place with upper class rich whites and bourgeois blacks and that's a fallacy.
I didn't say it's always been like that but in 2016 it's largely true. Even in the days when DC wasn't like that it still barely had a working class white population, if anything whites in Anacostia were middle class. All cities change but not to the extent of DC, it's truly night and day.
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Old 08-11-2016, 11:41 AM
 
4 posts, read 3,858 times
Reputation: 11
I am shocked how many people want the area to grow to one huge mega city with all the resulting traffic and tree loss. Just shocked.
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Old 08-13-2016, 07:47 PM
 
Location: God's Country
4,657 posts, read 3,025,497 times
Reputation: 7561
Huh? DC, Baltimore, Philly, NYC, and Boston have been one big megalopolis since the 50s.
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Old 08-15-2016, 08:03 PM
 
Location: London, NYC, DC
1,118 posts, read 1,907,192 times
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The biggest reason that DC and Baltimore aren't a megacity and won't be for a long time is structural: distribution of employment works against the two merging together. Both cities are functionally separate markets with strong cores that, due to geographical proximity, have some level of overlap, but not enough to overcome functional barriers to merging and therefore remain distinct labor markets, but you need to look at jobs specially to understand why.

In comparison to the Bay Area and Dallas-Fort Worth, DC and Baltimore's job hubs spread in opposing directions from their respective cores with the exception of BWI and Columbia, which are still more tied to Baltimore than DC because of population distribution. In the Bay Area, tech clusters between San Francisco and San Jose in a relatively linear fashion with pretty even dispersion in Redwood City, Menlo Park, Palo Alto, Mountain View, Sunnyvale and Santa Clara. San Jose is also odd in that it sees daytime population loss to other locations, therefore making it a core that's actually a bedroom community in many respects. Reverse commuting is eased by multiple arterials and transportation networks.

In Dallas-Fort Worth, this is similar; Dallas and Fort Worth's cores are less important in the larger picture and jobs cluster between the two or to the north of Dallas, facilitated by numerous highways and beltways. Both also have critical infrastructure placed centrally between them, particularly airports as well as industrial and logistics facilities. DC and Baltimore largely split this function; IAD and DCA are significantly more accessible to DC, Virginia and inner portions of Suburban Maryland, whereas BWI is more split but not a primary airport.

You also have to factor in identity and nomenclature. Areas with significant ties typically have shared characteristics and regional mentalities. The Twin Cities, the Bay Area, DFW…these are all important distinctions that bring the region together and are critical for further integration. This simply doesn't exist in DC and Baltimore. Both have relatively separate media markets, sports teams, historical references, names for each other and economic structures that keep residents of either MSA from seeing themselves as part of a larger megacity. Regionally, yes, there are shared traits, particularly in food (thinking crabs and such), but they're nowhere the same level as others mentioned here.
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Old 08-16-2016, 11:05 AM
 
1,051 posts, read 1,026,966 times
Reputation: 678
Quote:
Originally Posted by geoking66 View Post
The biggest reason that DC and Baltimore aren't a megacity and won't be for a long time is structural: distribution of employment works against the two merging together. Both cities are functionally separate markets with strong cores that, due to geographical proximity, have some level of overlap, but not enough to overcome functional barriers to merging and therefore remain distinct labor markets, but you need to look at jobs specially to understand why.

In comparison to the Bay Area and Dallas-Fort Worth, DC and Baltimore's job hubs spread in opposing directions from their respective cores with the exception of BWI and Columbia, which are still more tied to Baltimore than DC because of population distribution. In the Bay Area, tech clusters between San Francisco and San Jose in a relatively linear fashion with pretty even dispersion in Redwood City, Menlo Park, Palo Alto, Mountain View, Sunnyvale and Santa Clara. San Jose is also odd in that it sees daytime population loss to other locations, therefore making it a core that's actually a bedroom community in many respects. Reverse commuting is eased by multiple arterials and transportation networks.

In Dallas-Fort Worth, this is similar; Dallas and Fort Worth's cores are less important in the larger picture and jobs cluster between the two or to the north of Dallas, facilitated by numerous highways and beltways. Both also have critical infrastructure placed centrally between them, particularly airports as well as industrial and logistics facilities. DC and Baltimore largely split this function; IAD and DCA are significantly more accessible to DC, Virginia and inner portions of Suburban Maryland, whereas BWI is more split but not a primary airport.

You also have to factor in identity and nomenclature. Areas with significant ties typically have shared characteristics and regional mentalities. The Twin Cities, the Bay Area, DFW…these are all important distinctions that bring the region together and are critical for further integration. This simply doesn't exist in DC and Baltimore. Both have relatively separate media markets, sports teams, historical references, names for each other and economic structures that keep residents of either MSA from seeing themselves as part of a larger megacity. Regionally, yes, there are shared traits, particularly in food (thinking crabs and such), but they're nowhere the same level as others mentioned here.
This^^
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Old 08-19-2016, 10:49 AM
 
Location: USA
8,016 posts, read 9,071,260 times
Reputation: 3383
Who would be the greedy pig to benefit from that?
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Old 08-20-2016, 09:26 AM
 
5,292 posts, read 5,278,371 times
Reputation: 1100
No, it has not!!!! There you go, sticking your opinions into conversations you don't belong in. These cities are uniquely different with varying cultural norms and influences. Baltimore and Boston might as well be planet A & X in comparison to each other. Yes, they both have white ethnic communities along side black/brown neighborhoods, but the thinking of its citizens make these cities quite different.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Calvert Hall '62 View Post
Huh? DC, Baltimore, Philly, NYC, and Boston have been one big megalopolis since the 50s.
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