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Old 12-19-2017, 03:09 PM
 
189 posts, read 394,384 times
Reputation: 310

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NXNE View Post
I used to live in Cleveland Park until five years ago and was just back there visting a friend the other day when I was suprised to learn the Ripple a great award-winning neighborhood place (once home to Marjorie Meek-Blakely of Top Chef fame) had closed a few months ago. Was also surprised to learn that Nam-Viet and Dino, places that used to be jam packed when I lived nearby are now gone as well. Palena expands then goes under and the building is still vacant. Can't they fill it with anything? A deli, a bakery, hell even a Starbucks? The only thing that seems to have expanded lately is the 7-11. They are also renovating the CP library and are no doubt going to make it look like the Tenlytown library which is a garish nightmare.

The only nice place that opened nearby is Sfoglina, which isnt even in CP but in Van Ness/Forest Hills but in general it seems like the neighborhood is in decline and completely out of step with the rest of the city, which does not match with the steep housing market. It would seem there would be not just a demand better shops, bars and restaurants, but also more neighborhood opposition to thoughless construction like the UDC building or a massive 7-11 on the main drag. Is this the result of excessive NIMBYism?This slow decline or mailaise seems to be happening in much of upper NW (Van Ness, Tenly even upper Dupont Circle), albeit not as bad as CP. I can't remember the last time anyone actually made plans to hang out in Cleveland/AU Park, do young people even want to move here anymore? What went wrong with my old neighborhood and where are the residents on this?

What happened?
Mod cut: please wait with links until you have at least 10 posts.
Wow, it sounds like such a hellhole. LOL


Seriously, though, it's basically the same thing happening in Georgetown. Rents are prohibitively high for most businesses while there's still a lack of interest and regular foot traffic. Much of the regular population is older home-owners or absentee investors and young 20something professionals have moved on to other neighborhoods in the city. As older apartment and condo buildings start to get renovated on Connecticut some life will likely return, especially if UDC financially and academically stabilizes, grows and matures further in coming years. Locals probably LIKE that it isn't U Street or H Street, though.
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Old 12-30-2017, 08:33 PM
 
Location: DC-Baltimore area
259 posts, read 930,657 times
Reputation: 132
I rented shared places in the Woodley Park and Cleveland Park areas in the late 80s to early 90s. Back then I found the neighborhoods okay but kind of overrated and definitely overpriced. Now there is much more competition for these neighborhoods from up-and-coming areas of DC such as Logan Circle and NoMa, and places like Silver Spring, Arlington, etc.--seem to be more colorful areas with more going on. No movie theatre anymore in CP, unaffordable rents, etc., and where to park (if you keep a car)?? And frankly I do not miss dealing with DC city agencies in any way.
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Old 12-31-2017, 12:03 AM
 
13 posts, read 12,412 times
Reputation: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeyo321 View Post
Wow, it sounds like such a hellhole. LOL


Seriously, though, it's basically the same thing happening in Georgetown. Rents are prohibitively high for most businesses while there's still a lack of interest and regular foot traffic. Much of the regular population is older home-owners or absentee investors and young 20something professionals have moved on to other neighborhoods in the city. As older apartment and condo buildings start to get renovated on Connecticut some life will likely return, especially if UDC financially and academically stabilizes, grows and matures further in coming years. Locals probably LIKE that it isn't U Street or H Street, though.
I don't know what the solution is and I doubt UDC is gonna help if any thing it'll probably end up like AU which is completely divorced from Tenleytown/Cathedral Heights not sure if thats by design or not. A really disturbing trend are developers and landlords who seem to be fine with vacant lots which they are willing to right off seemingly for months or years until a national chain arrives (a la Starbucks, H&M etc) if at all just because they can afford the rents rather than taking a chance on a local business. I was just in upper Dupont (north of the circle) yesterday and can see the same trend there and in Georgetown with places like CIRCA closing. As a native DC resident its disturbing to see formely and still pricy areas slowly decline like that. This trend just isn't happening in Europe or Canada. I guess this is the result of our decades long real estate bubble. Its led to an unffordable and increasingly homogenized and bland city. The suburbs have moved into the city basically. When will it end?
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Old 01-06-2018, 08:27 AM
 
4,945 posts, read 8,268,137 times
Reputation: 2037
Quote:
Originally Posted by NXNE View Post
I don't know what the solution is and I doubt UDC is gonna help if any thing it'll probably end up like AU which is completely divorced from Tenleytown/Cathedral Heights not sure if thats by design or not. A really disturbing trend are developers and landlords who seem to be fine with vacant lots which they are willing to right off seemingly for months or years until a national chain arrives (a la Starbucks, H&M etc) if at all just because they can afford the rents rather than taking a chance on a local business. I was just in upper Dupont (north of the circle) yesterday and can see the same trend there and in Georgetown with places like CIRCA closing. As a native DC resident its disturbing to see formely and still pricy areas slowly decline like that. This trend just isn't happening in Europe or Canada. I guess this is the result of our decades long real estate bubble. Its led to an unffordable and increasingly homogenized and bland city. The suburbs have moved into the city basically. When will it end?
U donít make any sense but carry on.
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Old 01-09-2018, 06:31 PM
 
922 posts, read 835,313 times
Reputation: 1078
In 2000, DC's trendy destinations were basically Georgetown, Dupont, Adams Morgan and then Cleveland Park. Now DC has tons of areas.

Basically, CP's commercial strip went from being a "destination" neighborhood that attracted people from all over the city to a local neighborhood area. CP has some apartments on Conn Ave, but is basically a quasi-suburban SFH neighborhood. It simply doesn't have the density to support a vibrant retail/restaurant corridor.
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Old 01-31-2018, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC
1,257 posts, read 2,351,497 times
Reputation: 740
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpdivola View Post
In 2000, DC's trendy destinations were basically Georgetown, Dupont, Adams Morgan and then Cleveland Park. Now DC has tons of areas.

Basically, CP's commercial strip went from being a "destination" neighborhood that attracted people from all over the city to a local neighborhood area. CP has some apartments on Conn Ave, but is basically a quasi-suburban SFH neighborhood. It simply doesn't have the density to support a vibrant retail/restaurant corridor.
Agreed. I live in Chevy Chase and can walk down to CP but rarely do. It's definitely a place the locals hang out without many people from other neighborhoods. It's very common for people in DC to not venture out of their neighborhoods much. Why Uber, drive, walk, etc. when each neighborhood has their own local watering holes and restaurants?
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