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Old 10-04-2009, 08:06 AM
 
12 posts, read 20,214 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tech2enable View Post

The concept of people shifting from suburbs to urban ones is a very interesting one, but many researches indicate that it is too early to make a judgment call, it depends on the city, politics, as well as transit systems, downtowns, etc.

How much of it also depends on the easy credit of the housing bubble?

 
Old 10-04-2009, 10:18 AM
 
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I think for the most part its done.
 
Old 10-05-2009, 12:16 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ghina View Post

How much of it also depends on the easy credit of the housing bubble?
That true, I recently looked at townhouses in the D.C. area , I was a bit surprised that they are approaching new york levels more so than I thought they did in areas such as logan circle.

Homes going for 1.5-2 million dollars, with tight credit and no guarantee of income which can fluctuate, D.C. may be experiencing a housing bubble.

There were a few 20-30 million dollar homes for sale, a bit ridiculous too, its not oceanfront property either, the overwhelming amount of celebrities and people with lots of money usually would put their real estate money elsewhere such as california , new york, certain other coastal areas , seattle, islands off the florida cost such as with the golfers than D.C.

D.C. has government but the government jobs don't pay well for the housing costs, value, for the work you have to do, usually.

The federal government can layoff, cut back, and changes in government could send rents down.


 
Old 10-22-2009, 02:48 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,198 posts, read 32,321,772 times
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Eckington - or whatever it is east of N Capitol NE and between Florida Avenue NW and Rhode Island Avenue NW is gorgeous!
 
Old 10-22-2009, 08:49 AM
 
Location: Springfield VA
4,036 posts, read 7,452,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
Probably not. But I have seen major changes in my lifetime here. 3 out of 4 of the last administrations have been very pro-growth.

I still get a strange feeling on the rare occassion that I am on U street. Growing up here, it was the universal reference point amongst both blacks and whites as to what to avoid.
Really? Interesting. I didn't grow up here so to me U street is the epitome of cool. U street is my one day when I have some money neighborhood. It's funny how for you it's hard to imagine U street being a cool and safe spot, for me it's hard to imagine anything but.

Although I have heard about the 68 riots. How once upon a time U street was the Harlem of DC home to folks like Langston Hughes and Duke Ellington. At the end of the day it is funny how neighborhoods can continuously evolve.
 
Old 10-22-2009, 09:18 AM
 
Location: DC
3,254 posts, read 9,995,290 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terrence81 View Post
Really? Interesting. I didn't grow up here so to me U street is the epitome of cool. U street is my one day when I have some money neighborhood. It's funny how for you it's hard to imagine U street being a cool and safe spot, for me it's hard to imagine anything but.
Granted, I don't know how true this is, but I heard from a friend of mine who lives near 13th & U that there used to be a sign there saying that if you went any further the police couldn't offer you any protection. I also talked to some of her relatives in Maryland who said they were shocked (and scared) when she told them where she lived. They always knew it as a place to avoid and were surprised at how far it's come.

I agree with you, it's an awesome area. It's just interesting talking to people about how much the city has changed.
 
Old 10-22-2009, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Rockville, MD
3,548 posts, read 7,040,521 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by juniperbleu View Post
Granted, I don't know how true this is, but I heard from a friend of mine who lives near 13th & U that there used to be a sign there saying that if you went any further the police couldn't offer you any protection. I also talked to some of her relatives in Maryland who said they were shocked (and scared) when she told them where she lived. They always knew it as a place to avoid and were surprised at how far it's come.

I agree with you, it's an awesome area. It's just interesting talking to people about how much the city has changed.
Some of that stuff (like the police sign) is exagerrated or pure urban legend. But, there's no doubt that the U Street/14th Street areas have changed in a way that is practically incomprehensible to people who have lived in the area for the past 20-25 years. My father-in-law lived in Logan Circle in the late 80s, and when we tell people that the response is something along the lines of "what was he, a Navy SEAL?"

Gangs, drugs, violence, prostitutes...the awfulness of the area was very real. But now, it's one of the best areas to go out in the city. Funny how things change.
 
Old 10-22-2009, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Washington DC
5,913 posts, read 6,742,858 times
Reputation: 948
Quote:
Originally Posted by terrence81 View Post
Really? Interesting. I didn't grow up here so to me U street is the epitome of cool. U street is my one day when I have some money neighborhood. It's funny how for you it's hard to imagine U street being a cool and safe spot, for me it's hard to imagine anything but.

Although I have heard about the 68 riots. How once upon a time U street was the Harlem of DC home to folks like Langston Hughes and Duke Ellington. At the end of the day it is funny how neighborhoods can continuously evolve.
In the 80s U Street was a pretty rough place even west of 16th Street. You were always careful after dark.
 
Old 10-22-2009, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC
2,010 posts, read 2,764,989 times
Reputation: 1356
I used to live on Willard Street, half a block south of U between 17th and 18th Street. When I moved there 5 years ago, a taxi driver told me that had it been ten years earlier, he would have made me get out of the cab a few blocks before my place and walk the rest of the way. I couldn't believe it because Willard Street is one of the most beautiful blocks I have seen in any city anywhere, but I have heard the same thing from a lot of people. It's still my dream to buy one of those unbelievable townhouses on that block.

I have to say, the 14th Street area has changed a lot since even I moved into town. There were a few bars over there, but nothing like what there is now. I wouldn't have even considered buying a place there, but now I'll make the hike over there to get a beer or ten at least once a month. Solly's at 11th and U is one of my favorite bars.
 
Old 10-22-2009, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Rockville, MD
3,548 posts, read 7,040,521 times
Reputation: 1341
Quote:
Originally Posted by tech2enable View Post
There were a few 20-30 million dollar homes for sale, a bit ridiculous too, its not oceanfront property either, the overwhelming amount of celebrities and people with lots of money usually would put their real estate money elsewhere such as california , new york, certain other coastal areas , seattle, islands off the florida cost such as with the golfers than D.C.

D.C. has government but the government jobs don't pay well for the housing costs, value, for the work you have to do, usually.
Boy, you really don't understand the DC market at all, do you? In your mind, we're all government workers making government wages. Several of the wealthiest counties in the nation--including the top three wealthiest--are all in the DC region. And upper NW DC would be among them as well, if it were considered seperately.

There's a substantial amount of money in this region, and it isn't coming from salaried government employees. If you'd done your homework as you say, you would know that.
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