U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > District of Columbia > Washington, DC
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 10-23-2009, 08:42 AM
 
9,985 posts, read 15,648,612 times
Reputation: 4599

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by terrence81 View Post
Really? Interesting. I didn't grow up here so to me U street is the epitome of cool. U street is my one day when I have some money neighborhood. It's funny how for you it's hard to imagine U street being a cool and safe spot, for me it's hard to imagine anything but.

Although I have heard about the 68 riots. How once upon a time U street was the Harlem of DC home to folks like Langston Hughes and Duke Ellington. At the end of the day it is funny how neighborhoods can continuously evolve.
Yes, very interesting and very true. It was the closest thing to the South Bronx back then- lots of torched and abandoned buildings, hookers, junkies, etc.

I also spent most of the 80s and 90s in New York, so I did not witness the gentrification of the area as it was happening. One day I came home for a visit and a friend took me there. I was amazed to say the least.

Being a middle aged old man now, I really do not get down there much. But I like what I have seen.

 
Old 10-23-2009, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Washington DC
5,913 posts, read 6,741,531 times
Reputation: 948
The subway construction almost finished what the riots didn't. It took a long time and businesses on the street really suffered. I lived on T street between 17 & 18th back in the 80s. That was as fringy then as Columbia Heights is today.
 
Old 10-23-2009, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Washington, DC
2,010 posts, read 2,764,121 times
Reputation: 1356
Quote:
Originally Posted by rlchurch View Post
The subway construction almost finished what the riots didn't. It took a long time and businesses on the street really suffered. I lived on T street between 17 & 18th back in the 80s. That was as fringy then as Columbia Heights is today.
What I would give for a rowhome on that block today...
 
Old 10-23-2009, 10:47 AM
 
9,985 posts, read 15,648,612 times
Reputation: 4599
Quote:
Originally Posted by rlchurch View Post
The subway construction almost finished what the riots didn't. It took a long time and businesses on the street really suffered. I lived on T street between 17 & 18th back in the 80s. That was as fringy then as Columbia Heights is today.

Maybe more so....
 
Old 10-23-2009, 11:19 AM
 
Location: DC
3,254 posts, read 9,993,899 times
Reputation: 1240
Quote:
Originally Posted by KStreetQB View Post
What I would give for a rowhome on that block today...
Weird, isn't it? And it's not just DC. I remember driving through the Northern Liberties neighborhood in Philadelphia as a kid and seeing nothing but abandoned factories, empty homes, trash, and grafitti. Granted, it's still a gritty area, but now there's a bunch of bars, restaurants, clubs, and it's a popular place for artists and younger people to live. My parents even told me that a square there hosts Eagles tailgating parties now, too. Ten years ago you'd never want to go there, nor have any reason to. It's amazing how some areas can change in a fairly quick amount of time.
 
Old 10-23-2009, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC
2,010 posts, read 2,764,121 times
Reputation: 1356
Quote:
Originally Posted by juniperbleu View Post
Weird, isn't it? And it's not just DC. I remember driving through the Northern Liberties neighborhood in Philadelphia as a kid and seeing nothing but abandoned factories, empty homes, trash, and grafitti. Granted, it's still a gritty area, but now there's a bunch of bars, restaurants, clubs, and it's a popular place for artists and younger people to live. My parents even told me that a square there hosts Eagles tailgating parties now, too. Ten years ago you'd never want to go there, nor have any reason to. It's amazing how some areas can change in a fairly quick amount of time.
I was just back in Northern Liberties weekend before last. It has really come a long way. I didn't believe it when I heard that NL and Fishtown were turning around, but they really do have a great scene up there.

I was spending almost 3 hours of my life a day commuting into Philly for a few years before moving down to DC. I knew right away that I wanted to be right downtown in my new city. I'm sure areas have all sorts of reasons for turning around, but affordability within striking distance of the CBD creates a pretty high index for desirability.

Also, go Phils.
 
Old 10-23-2009, 09:39 PM
 
Location: Germantown, MD
1,359 posts, read 3,046,263 times
Reputation: 561
Hopefully never...
 
Old 10-24-2009, 02:48 AM
 
656 posts, read 1,195,978 times
Reputation: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by 14thandYou View Post
Boy, you really don't understand the DC market at all, do you? In your mind, we're all government workers making government wages. Several of the wealthiest counties in the nation--including the top three wealthiest--are all in the DC region. And upper NW DC would be among them as well, if it were considered seperately.


There's a substantial amount of money in this region, and it isn't coming from salaried government employees. If you'd done your homework as you say, you would know that.
High income counties do not equate to being wealthy, and yes nearly 1 out of every 5 employees in certain regions work for the government which in turn supports other jobs, of course the wealth that does exist comes from contractors, lobbyists and the well connected predominately.
 
Old 10-24-2009, 02:28 PM
 
3,102 posts, read 7,490,746 times
Reputation: 1852
Quote:
Originally Posted by tech2enable View Post
High income counties do not equate to being wealthy
Huh? How could they not?
 
Old 10-24-2009, 03:09 PM
 
Location: SE
331 posts, read 998,463 times
Reputation: 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
Yes, very interesting and very true. It was the closest thing to the South Bronx back then- lots of torched and abandoned buildings, hookers, junkies, etc.

Yes, it is very interesting and I still watch my back (out of habit) when I'm there. I remember when I was a poor college student in the mid-80's, I rented an apartment off of 16th. I went to bed hungry one night because I fell asleep and it was dark when I woke. I had nothing in my fridge, the thought of going out was out of the question and of course nobody was delivering!
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > District of Columbia > Washington, DC
Similar Threads
View detailed profiles of:

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top