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Old 09-29-2019, 08:22 PM
 
Location: Rochester, WA
8,223 posts, read 4,878,941 times
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If you'd like me to, I'd love to represent you. It's a little out of our normal area, but we're willing to cover it. We love to drive the countryside.


And if you would like... I don't mind calling that listing agent about the septic tomorrow.


It might be possible to do such a purchase with a rehab loan, but I might advise if you're going to buy remotely and live away from here for awhile, I might try to keep things as simple as possible. Rehab loans are difficult even with someone local here who can run around and get bids. PM me, and we can talk more about how all that works, and other factors in your search and timing.
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Old 09-29-2019, 10:34 PM
 
Location: Independent Republic of Ballard
7,351 posts, read 5,943,766 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katwynne View Post
CD. What do you know about this area? Is this an appreciable location if the house is viable? Do you know how much a septic costs? Do you think I could rent this property?

19 Harrison Rd, South Bend, WA 98586
Sleepy. Slow. Small. Conservative (more than Grays Harbor). Next door to Raymond, which isn't very big (~2,900). One major grocery store (Thriftway) in Raymond. Willapa Hills is mostly tree farms.

Positives: Great oysters. Birds and wildlife. Classic old movie house (Raymond Theater). Good public swimming pool (Raymond Swimming Pool). Not far from Long Beach (clam digging).

Closer to Portland/further to Port Townsend (than OS).

I don't know anything about septic systems. Sounds like "a pig in a poke".

See: https://www.historylink.org/File/7914/

German, Polish, Greek, and Finnish immigrants came to work the sawmills, cranberry bogs, and shell fish farms (I remember going out for Sunday breakfast as a kid in Aberdeen and hearing Finnish being spoken at half the tables).

Quote:
South Bend, down the Willapa River from Raymond, was founded in 1869. It was a lumber and sawmill town. In 1889, men associated with the Northern Pacific Railroad bought land there and within five years the town boomed from 150 souls to 3,500. The town went from boom to bust and back to boom several times, with fishing, oystering, canning, and the lumber business providing its economic base. In 1892 it became county seat and in 1910 erected the grand county courthouse, which was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1977.

Today South Bend is a community of docks, fishing boats, crab-processing plants, and other enterprises and is home to the county historical museum. As county seat, South Bend houses numerous Pacific County government functions.
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Old 09-30-2019, 05:36 AM
 
21 posts, read 9,316 times
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CD: Great information. Thank you! The conservative bent bothers me a little, given that I am hard left politically, but if I’m remote, perhaps it wouldn’t affect me dramatically, unless they started cutting down all the trees and drilling oil on the reservation land. Then I would get bent out of shape. My biggest objection to the hard right is their lack of environmental stewardship. I’m a tree hugger from early years and not likely to change now.

After reading the history, or parts of it anyway due to a lack of time to complete the article, I didn’t realize the property was so close to the mighty Columbia. I revere the river since I spent 28 years living next to it in Vancouver and Portland. I will be ‘almost home.’

At any rate. I appreciate your insight. I will work with Diana, if she’ll have me and my diarrhea of the keyboard, to find a place. If you come up with any more properties that seem viable, please let me know. I am finding value in our communications.

Thanks!

Kat~. : )
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Old 09-30-2019, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Rochester, WA
8,223 posts, read 4,878,941 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katwynne View Post
CD: Great information. Thank you! The conservative bent bothers me a little, given that I am hard left politically, but if I’m remote, perhaps it wouldn’t affect me dramatically, unless they started cutting down all the trees and drilling oil on the reservation land. Then I would get bent out of shape. My biggest objection to the hard right is their lack of environmental stewardship. I’m a tree hugger from early years and not likely to change now.
Katwynne, if I may, I think we should talk a little about this... in private, but also public here where others from around here can chime in.

One thing you can depend on before moving to this area is they ARE going to cut down trees here. Look at the google earth view and all the timber lands. Spend a lot of time doing that. Look at the vastness of the trees and the patchwork of logging and replanting that is happening here, and has been happening here for generations. This is timber country. It is how many live. It is a crop, IMHO, not unlike other crops, it's just it takes 50 years for the crop to grow again. And it is one of our major crops.

Rural people live off the land and natural resources. They fish, hunt, log, and farm. Some take better care of their land than others, certainly... and we have no doubt learned much in this generation that prior generations didn't know. And we can always keep improving, but it's not right to say they don't care about it... most do. Loggers are the stewards.

Logging is not poor stewardship, it is, in fact the best use of much of that land, and logging it every fifty years is perhaps ugly in the very short term, but one thing that will amaze you when you get here is how quickly the land recovers and grows again, and wildlife and habitat is actually benefited by logging in many ways. It renews the forest and the variety of forage much in the same way fire naturally does. Only without a lot of the devastation. And in a way that can actually be designed to leave it better than it was.

Now, the bad news is, we are still logging like we always have, but instead of every small town having a sawmill where we made lumber and goods out of it, we're shipping most of our logs overseas to Asia. They make things out of it and ship it back to us. That has killed a lot of the small town mills, and a lot of the small towns, around here... some will never recover. I think that's a shame.

We don't have to agree completely on logging, but I would consider keeping your mind open while learning about these little towns and wondering if you want to live here. All of these little towns out here survive on the environment. And that doesn't always look the way we might expect. Maybe some time we can talk about it more.

And when it comes to voting results and figuring out the politics of an area... the rural percentages are never further apart than 40-60. It's really pretty even, whether it's 55-45 or 49-51. IMHO, it keeps most of our rural politics pretty polite... there's no real clear majority.

That's my two cents Katwynne! I hope I can work with you, and if you come out here, I would LOVE to show you around. We can talk more later... I'll cut it short, I can be long-winded too...
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Old 09-30-2019, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Independent Republic of Ballard
7,351 posts, read 5,943,766 times
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When I said "conservative" I was largely referring to the immigrant mix, which is still there - there is a German store in South Bend, for instance: https://www.facebook.com/jaydensgermanstore/. Not the same (Calvinist, Catholic, Lutheran) as "southern" conservatism (Baptist). Different than even Eastern Washington.

I understand about tree farms and have no objection to them, as such - in most cases, they are third and fourth growth. I think it is monotonous and not particularly scenic, let alone "natural", but it is what it is.

The main controversy was over logging old growth in the Olympic National Forest, to which I do have an objection. Even in Olympic National Park you'll see second growth, originally logged in the 19th and early 20th centuries, with notches on the tall stumps four to five feet or so off the ground, showing they were cut down, standing on boards, using two-man crosscut saws. That can also be prime elk country.
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Old 09-30-2019, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Rochester, WA
8,223 posts, read 4,878,941 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazyDonkey View Post
I understand about tree farms and have no objection to them, as such - in most cases, they are third and fourth growth. I think it is monotonous and not particularly scenic, let alone "natural", but it is what it is.

The main controversy was over logging old growth in the Olympic National Forest, to which I do have an objection. Even in Olympic National Park you'll see second growth, originally logged in the 19th and early 20th centuries, with notches on the tall stumps four to five feet or so off the ground, showing they were cut down, standing on boards, using two-man crosscut saws. That can also be prime elk country.
Though State and National forest land was never intended to be off limits to logging, we can certainly decide we want to preserve certain areas as old growth for the marvel of it... The massive trees are neat to look at and a natural wonder.

They are though, FWIW, also fairly dark and dead underneath and devoid of wildlife. Most wildlife, including elk, thrive better in younger forest and clearcut areas where there is more light, and more diversity of low forage. The absolute best of all worlds for wildlife is a patchwork where older forest that is good for cover, is adjacent to younger forest and open, recently logged areas where the bushes, trees, and berries that deer, elk and bear need, grow. It's not unlike the kind of diversity that might happen naturally in areas around old forest fires.

Two more cents.
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Old 09-30-2019, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Independent Republic of Ballard
7,351 posts, read 5,943,766 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diana Holbrook View Post
Though State and National forest land was never intended to be off limits to logging, we can certainly decide we want to preserve certain areas as old growth for the marvel of it... The massive trees are neat to look at and a natural wonder.

They are though, FWIW, also fairly dark and dead underneath and devoid of wildlife. Most wildlife, including elk, thrive better in younger forest and clearcut areas where there is more light, and more diversity of low forage. The absolute best of all worlds for wildlife is a patchwork where older forest that is good for cover, is adjacent to younger forest and open, recently logged areas where the bushes, trees, and berries that deer, elk and bear need, grow. It's not unlike the kind of diversity that might happen naturally in areas around old forest fires.

Two more cents.
There are arguments on both sides, with neither having a monopoly on the truth. True old growth is composed of trees of varying age and height, compared with forest that was heavily logged or clearcut, for instance, which is more likely to be trees of the same age and height. Multiple canopy forests are more diverse than single canopy forests. Old growth forest can also be more resistant to forest fire and, because of less undergrowth, less prone to wildfires. Elk tend to browse in "forest edge" terrain.
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Old 09-30-2019, 01:25 PM
 
Location: Rochester, WA
8,223 posts, read 4,878,941 times
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It's a good topic for good discussion.
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Old 09-30-2019, 07:36 PM
 
21 posts, read 9,316 times
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My silence is bred of thought. I will eventually chime in with my six cents. Keep talking. I enjoy the exchange.
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Old 09-30-2019, 07:46 PM
 
21 posts, read 9,316 times
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I will say I have never felt closer to the soul of the universe than when I was wandering in the ONP. I describe it to people as six foot diameter trees growing on top of dead six foot diameter trees. We slept in the snow in its midst and I never felt safer. This was in 1975. I understand tree farming, and it is a necessary industry. I only hope that what old growth is left will stay left. Let them harvest as many of their planted trees as they want. That’s why they are grown. The world needs wood. Just leave the true forests alone. The ecosystem needs them. The travesty of the Amazon will wreak havoc with the ecosystem of Brazil. Whether planted or wild a tree is a beautiful thing. And that’s all I have to say about that.
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