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View Poll Results: Would you rather have it 100 or 0 (F)?
100 deg 44 57.14%
0 deg 33 42.86%
Voters: 77. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 07-17-2010, 10:02 PM
 
Location: Cloudchurch, Subantarctica
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0 F is really severe cold (-18 C) whereas 100 F (38 C), while certainly very uncomfortable, is tolerable if you stay in the shade and don't exert yourself.

Note that 100 F is about 25 F above what is normally considered optimum for human comfort (and recommended by the WHO), whereas 0 F is 75 F below. So 100 F is much closer to optimum temperature than 0 F.
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Old 07-17-2010, 10:07 PM
 
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I would choose 100 and it looks like posting this topic in the middle of summer didn't skew the results since 100 is winning by far.
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Old 07-17-2010, 10:10 PM
 
6,046 posts, read 6,198,703 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChesterNZ View Post
0 F is really severe cold (-18 C) whereas 100 F (38 C), while certainly very uncomfortable, is tolerable if you stay in the shade and don't exert yourself.

Note that 100 F is about 25 F above what is normally considered optimum for human comfort (and recommended by the WHO), whereas 0 F is 75 F below. So 100 F is much closer to optimum temperature than 0 F.
I agree that humans are designed for warm temperatures. I would not say 100 is very uncomfortable though. I've experienced 100 degrees this summer and I'd take that over 40, let alone 0.

Also, keep in mind that the highest temperature ever recorded on earth was 136 and the coldest was -128. So it can get a lot colder than 0 but it can't get much warmer than 100 (relatively speaking).
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Old 07-17-2010, 10:17 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
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Give me the 0 degree week anytime. I'd even take a week of -20 over 3 days of 100+. Heat just drains me and I just can't take it. I've been miserable the last month or so here because it has been above 80 (hasn't hit 90 yet).
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Old 07-17-2010, 10:19 PM
 
Location: Back in COLORADO!!!
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You know, both extreme heat and extreme cold suck, but, given my choice, I'll take heat every time.

I've never had to shovel a foot of heat off my driveway.

I've never slid off the road on a sheet of black ice during a heat wave.

I've never seen a pipe burst because it got too hot and froze.

Oh, from my perspective, 100 degrees F. isn't all that hot. Out here around Pueblo Colorado, it is not at all unusual to have a week or so of daytime highs above 100. Just sayin'.....
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Old 07-17-2010, 10:23 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
10,644 posts, read 5,853,498 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenScoutII View Post
You know, both extreme heat and extreme cold suck, but, given my choice, I'll take heat every time.

I've never had to shovel a foot of heat off my driveway.

I've never slid off the road on a sheet of black ice during a heat wave.

I've never seen a pipe burst because it got too hot and froze.

Oh, from my perspective, 100 degrees F. isn't all that hot. Out here around Pueblo Colorado, it is not at all unusual to have a week or so of daytime highs above 100. Just sayin'.....
Usually when it's 0 F, there isn't much moisture in the air, so it most likely won't snow. Of course there are exceptions, but generally it's too dry.

I would much rather put up with winter's headaches than summer's heat. Plus, you're fortunate enough to have a dry heat in Colorado. Come to the east coast and see how 100 F feels.
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Old 07-17-2010, 10:24 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
Give me the 0 degree week anytime. I'd even take a week of -20 over 3 days of 100+. Heat just drains me and I just can't take it. I've been miserable the last month or so here because it has been above 80 (hasn't hit 90 yet).
Amen to that. It's been even worst here in New Jersey. I'm really going to appreciate fall this year!
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Old 07-17-2010, 10:33 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
8,898 posts, read 7,121,413 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChesterNZ View Post
0 F is really severe cold (-18 C) whereas 100 F (38 C), while certainly very uncomfortable, is tolerable if you stay in the shade and don't exert yourself.

Note that 100 F is about 25 F above what is normally considered optimum for human comfort (and recommended by the WHO), whereas 0 F is 75 F below. So 100 F is much closer to optimum temperature than 0 F.
I can see 75 being comfortable for me if I were naked.....and the humidity was low. But in my house in the winter it's usually around 64-65, and regardless of what I'm wearing (or not wearing!) I'm considerably more comfortable than in summer when my house is 74-76. But my big issue is with humidity. I've felt 75 and low humidity (I had to go to Denver to experience it, but still) and it was just fine. But 75 back here in TN is usually fairly uncomfortable to me. Although, right now, I'd give anything for a day time high of 75...

When it's 100 degrees here, or 90 for that matter (which is more common) standing in the shade only helps a little. There has to be a breeze for my sweat to cool me off a noticeable amount, and there's rarely wind here in the summer. So my sweat just runs all the way down my body to my feet, without doing any good. Yesterday at work I literally had streams of sweat dribbling off of my arms and hands. And most of the time I was hardly even exerting myself. It feels like you're in a pot on the stove with the lid on it, and it's on the verge of boiling. Apparently it doesn't bother most people as much as me, but that's how it feels to me.
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Old 07-17-2010, 10:45 PM
 
Location: Back in COLORADO!!!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovemycomputer90 View Post

Plus, you're fortunate enough to have a dry heat in Colorado. Come to the east coast and see how 100 F feels.
Well, you do have a point, humidity does have a way of making heat or cold seem worse than it is. I did spend two weeks in Houston in July when it was mid 90's for temperature AND humidity, but for me it wasn't too bad. Plus, as someone who suffers from psoriasis, the damp climate seemed to help.

As far as dry heat is concerned, at my altitude a guy is getting what seems like dang near unfiltered sunlight. The effect can best be compared to sitting under a heat lamp. It will roast, dehydrate, and mummify you quicker than you would think possible.

But, that said, I guess all of us are unique in our physiology and what kind of weather and temperature we are best equipped to handle
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Old 07-17-2010, 11:30 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
10,644 posts, read 5,853,498 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenScoutII View Post
Well, you do have a point, humidity does have a way of making heat or cold seem worse than it is. I did spend two weeks in Houston in July when it was mid 90's for temperature AND humidity, but for me it wasn't too bad. Plus, as someone who suffers from psoriasis, the damp climate seemed to help.

As far as dry heat is concerned, at my altitude a guy is getting what seems like dang near unfiltered sunlight. The effect can best be compared to sitting under a heat lamp. It will roast, dehydrate, and mummify you quicker than you would think possible.

But, that said, I guess all of us are unique in our physiology and what kind of weather and temperature we are best equipped to handle
Indeed. As we all know, dry heat and humid heat both have drawbacks and positives. With that said, I'd rather deal with no heat.
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