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Old 07-22-2010, 07:15 AM
 
Location: USA East Coast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
I don't think PR, the Virgin Islands or American Samoa should count. More places in the US proper. Hawaii is just below the Tropic of Cancer, yet it's oceanity means it never really gets cold there. I believe the record lowest minimum for Honolulu is only 50F (10C).

Florida is interesting. I think southern Florida is a true Aw climate with two major seasons. It'd be interesting if someone did a study comparing the monsoon in the Gulf to that of Southeast Asia or India at a comparable latitude. Climates like Central or Northern China have like a tropical moonsoonal rainfall pattern with temperate zone temperatures.
From what I can tell...the big difference between South Florida and Hawaii is that the infrequent cold shots are more severe in Florida. The record low in Honolulu is 49 F (2/9/1981)...and the record low in Miami is 26 F (12/30/1934) and Key West 41 F (1/13/1981). However, the mean or normal winter lows (Dec/Jan/Feb) between places like Key West/Miami and Honolulu is only about 6 or 7 F apart.


As far as monsoons...I have always found them interesting. From what I can tell, the Aw is really more a South Florida/Bahamas/Atlantic thing…then a Gulf of Mexico thing. Rainfall much west of Florida seems to have less a seasonal footprint and rainfall in generally falls to much lower levels. As far as the East Asian monsoon, it seems like it is the strongest monsoon outside the tropics on earth. Places like Pusan, South Korea or Tokyo, Japan (about the latitude of Washington DC/Baltimore, MD) have a very strong winter monsoon (very dry) and pretty strong summer monsoon (wet). From what I understand…there really is a semblance of a monsoon pattern on the East Coast of the USA too…it just much weaker and more intrurepted (especially in winter). Starting around the NYC area and moving southward…the warm season (May through October) slowly become the wettest time…increasing the more one works their way southward. Around southern/coastal South Carolina/Georgia you can really see footprint of the summer monsoon…the hot season has 60 to 70 % of the yearly rainfall.

According the paper I linked above, I think that is the debate in North Florida now…the classification of north Florida should be changed to more of a Cw climate (subtropical monsoon) like East Asia/southeast Asia. Many times even in north Florida…one of the winter months will have less than 1 inch of rainfall…and one of the summer months will have 10 times that amount – by definition a Cw climate. According to the research in the paper, examination of rainfall data from 1927 – 2001 at many north Florida stations…showed that there were only 9 years out of 74 years…when the 10:1 ratio was not met (the Koppen definition for a monsoon climate). So I think that if one really looked at seasonal rainfall in most of Florida they might be surprised that there are great similarities to the monsoon rhythm in other parts of the world.


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Old 07-22-2010, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
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So the general pattern in the subtropical / temperate latitudes , is west coast of continents have a winter wet season, while east coasts have a summer wet season. Seems strongest between about 25 and 40 degrees in most places (for example the immediate east coast of North America has a slight winter wet season north of 42 degrees or so). Do people think that's right? Or can they find exceptions?
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Old 07-22-2010, 12:20 PM
 
Location: USA East Coast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
So the general pattern in the subtropical / temperate latitudes , is west coast of continents have a winter wet season, while east coasts have a summer wet season. Seems strongest between about 25 and 40 degrees in most places (for example the immediate east coast of North America has a slight winter wet season north of 42 degrees or so). Do people think that's right? Or can they find exceptions?


I think that is pretty much the general theme.

From around 40 degrees latitude (NYC/Sacramento, CA) southward…the west coast has more rain in winter (summers are very dry)…and the East Coast has more rain in summer than winter (winters still have a modest amount of rain however – at least north of Florida). Of course the wet/dry season become much sharper the further south you move on the East Coast…however I think the seasonal pecip pattern is much sharper in the USA along the West Coast than the East Coast, at least north of Florida. The east coast of North America much north of NYC …has rainfall that is pretty evenly spaced…and your right some stations in the Canadian Maritimes and upper New England show a winter maxima. The upper west coast of North America seems have much more rainfall in winter than summers…but places like Vancouver still have some rain in summer.

There might be exceptions on other mainland areas in the world between West/East coast locations.
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Old 07-24-2010, 09:29 PM
 
Location: Subarctic maritime Melbourne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChesterNZ View Post

Spare a thought for those of us living in climactically homogenous countries. There's only one kind of climate here -- oceanic, the most boring climate type in existence!
not to mention the dampest, drizzliest, cloudiest climate horror in existance!
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Old 02-28-2011, 03:48 AM
 
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"From what I can tell...the big difference between South Florida and Hawaii is that the infrequent cold shots are more severe in Florida. The record low in Honolulu is 49 F (2/9/1981)...and the record low in Miami is 26 F (12/30/1934) and Key West 41 F (1/13/1981). However, the mean or normal winter lows (Dec/Jan/Feb) between places like Key West/Miami and Honolulu is only about 6 or 7 F apart."

Hey, let's not forget that 11 of 13 climates are found in the state of Hawaii itself. This actually does include the Polar/Polar Tundra Climate with permanently frozen soil, untouched rainforests, deserts and so much more! Mauna Kea is translated to 'White Mountain'. Yes, folks, it's covered with snow year round. How cold does it have to be for that? Not sure exactly, but pretty cold! The Universe is observed on top of this mountain by NASA! Contrary to popular belief, "Mauna Kea is the world’s tallest mountain, rising over 32,000 feet from the ocean floor to its summit, which is considered by many Hawaiians to be the most sacred place in all the islands." I'd say sacred sounds about rightl... There's also Mauna Loa, Loa translates to 'great', 'very', 'extreme'... It's also part of my name, Loana, cool, huh?!
([url=http://www.hawaii-forest.com/index.php/tours/hawaii_observatory_tour_mauna_kea_stars_adventure]Mauna Kea Tour: Mauna Kea Summit & Stars Adventure | Hawaii Forest & Trail[/url], see also: [url=http://www.hawaii-forest.com/index.php/articles/koppens_climates]Koppen’s Climates | Hawaii Forest & Trail[/url]) The island of Kauai boasts the second wettest spot on earth-a true blue rainforest. Hawaii has the highest number of extinct plants and animals that will never be found anywhere else on earth, as the plants/animals lived in such a remote location, originating from wind, waves, and birds-what birds carried and bird poop, too! Ever heard of Molokai mini deer? Or wild boars with tusks as big as a large man's arm? Yep! And these are both still hunted (actually the boars aren't going extinct, I may be wrong). The locals hunt these boars with bare hands and knives, and backpack the buggers down the mountain! Quite a sight to see. Some of the best ham you'll ever have! Okay, back to the climate stuff: Not only does the US rock in terms of "go where you wanna go when you wanna go to do what you wanna do, oh, and don't forget to write to me about the weather..." Hawaii stands out with the fact that 11 of those 13 climate zones are magnificently placed in an area of only about 4,000 square miles! Like no other place on earth. Really. That's what they say. And no, we don't live in grass huts, but yes, we do squeal like children when we see snow on the 'mainland'. Just wanted to stop by and give props where propers were due! Thanks for reading!

Last edited by loanah; 02-28-2011 at 03:54 AM.. Reason: enter quote.
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Old 03-15-2011, 03:26 AM
 
Location: Carrboro and Concord, NC
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I'd guess Argentina - which at least matches the US.
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Old 03-15-2011, 05:43 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidals View Post
I'd guess Argentina - which at least matches the US.
If anywhere is gonna approach the US in the sheer number of climate zones, it's gotta be out of China or Australia. Either way, the US is indeed the most climatically diverse nation acre for acre.
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Old 03-15-2011, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
If anywhere is gonna approach the US in the sheer number of climate zones, it's gotta be out of China or Australia. Either way, the US is indeed the most climatically diverse nation acre for acre.

As this relates to another thread today, wouldn't you agree that Cf in the USA is totally diff than Cf in Aus? The SE USA, excluding FL, gets much colder in winter than Australia. The low temps experienced in the SE USA would shock most people in Europe or Aus who have been led to believe the area has mild winters. Does Sydney have low temps in the upper teens every winter, or at least the low 20's? To me it is really stretching it saying the SE USA is sub-tropical because it has hot humid summers.
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Old 03-15-2011, 09:58 PM
 
Location: PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
As this relates to another thread today, wouldn't you agree that Cf in the USA is totally diff than Cf in Aus? The SE USA, excluding FL, gets much colder in winter than Australia. The low temps experienced in the SE USA would shock most people in Europe or Aus who have been led to believe the area has mild winters. Does Sydney have low temps in the upper teens every winter, or at least the low 20's? To me it is really stretching it saying the SE USA is sub-tropical because it has hot humid summers.
The problem we have here in the U.S. as to why we have colder winters than we're supposed to, is I think, due to a lack of tall mountains straddling the Canadian-U.S. border and/or the fact that the Appalachians are pretty low elevation. If the Appalachian range was 8000 feet taller, I'd imagine the Piedmont region of the U.S. and the coastal plain of the east coast would experience Queensland-like temperatures. Where I live is almost the same exact latitude as Madrid and Rome, yet winters here can get very cold. But when no cold front comes through from Canada, it has gotten up to the low 50s here on such occasions. Our climate more has to do which the way the wind is blowing than our position relative to the equator and poles, I think. If the Rockies were an east-west mountain chain straddling the border, as opposed to its current north-south orientation, the U.S. would have Australian winters I believe
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Old 03-15-2011, 10:12 PM
 
Location: USA East Coast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
The problem we have here in the U.S. as to why we have colder winters than we're supposed to, is I think, due to a lack of tall mountains straddling the Canadian-U.S. border and/or the fact that the Appalachians are pretty low elevation. If the Appalachian range was 8000 feet taller, I'd imagine the Piedmont region of the U.S. and the coastal plain of the east coast would experience Queensland-like temperatures. Where I live is almost the same exact latitude as Madrid and Rome, yet winters here can get very cold. But when no cold front comes through from Canada, it has gotten up to the low 50s here on such occasions. Our climate more has to do which the way the wind is blowing than our position relative to the equator and poles, I think. If the Rockies were an east-west mountain chain straddling the border, as opposed to its current north-south orientation, the U.S. would have Australian winters I believe
From what I understand…your 100% right.

The lacks of terrain barriers in the USA allow very cold air masses from up in Canada to rush southward toward the Gulf Coast and only slowly modified as they head southward. You see this play out a few times each winter. You’ll see a pool of – 50 F air up in the Northwest Terr…then it crosses the USA/Canadian border in the upper Midwest and the temp has only modified to -20 F…then it rushes southward through the Great Plains and is still near 0 F…and finally might arrive on the Texas coast with lows of 15 or 20 F . In Australia (a much, much smaller continent) there is no source of cold advection (no land areas in higher latitudes), so cooler air in winter comes in more modified forum. Brisbane and New Orleans which are located close to the same latitude and have close to the same annual mean temperature have record lows far apart. The record low at Brisbane is 32 F I think…but the record low at New Orleans is 7 F.

As far as which direction the wind blows...I think your dead on. Despite what is common knowleged, there really is a monsoon in the eastern USA. The cold offshore winds that come out of the northwest bring shots of cold air in winter.....and the southerly flow out of the Bermuda High brings sultury tropical air from the deep tropics in summer. It's just unlike East Asia at the 35 to 40 latitdue, our rainfall is not seasonally concentrated. This is why the joke of people who move to NYC or Washington DC are shocked that a climate that gets so hot in summer can get so cold in winter. Maybe not cold compared to Russia, Canada...etc...but quite cold for 35 - 40 latitude.

Last edited by wavehunter007; 03-15-2011 at 10:20 PM..
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