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Old 07-27-2010, 07:09 PM
 
Location: USA East Coast
4,445 posts, read 4,762,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B1987 View Post
I didn't realise that so much of the US had frigid winters. According to that map, you can't really espace it until you are very near the Gulf Coast. I thought our January lows were cold at 37F but they're actually warmer than about 90% of the US.
You’re absolutely right. Only the Gulf/south Atlantic States and parts of the southwest are really warmer than London in winter (lows above 40 F). Of course January is the coldest month of the year...the above 40 F isotherm gets bigger in Feb and much bigger in March.

on the other hand...keep in mind the USA mainland is 30 times larger than England – lol. So that zone from East Texas to South Carolina is 1000 miles long - lol. Southern AZ/Southern CA has a land area about the same as all of England. People forget how big this country is.
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Old 07-27-2010, 07:43 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,691 posts, read 19,705,146 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by ADGreen View Post
You need to move to Australia, probably the state of NSW in particular (sorry no help with the US areas).

Here in Sydney we do not get hot summers (maximums are in the 70s and 80s although a handful of days in the 90s and maybe one or two in the low 100s), but our winters are very mild and quite sunny (in July our coldest month, most days climb to the low 60s).

It can rain a bit though and our sunshine totals are nothing like California, but if you are after relatively low fluctuations of climate year round, it is not a bad bet

Snow is an almost non event as well.

Perth's temperatures are very similar to San Diego's, although it's wetter year round and summers are a touch hotter/winters colder.
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Old 07-27-2010, 08:18 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,598 posts, read 15,613,823 times
Reputation: 3250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Perth's temperatures are very similar to San Diego's, although it's wetter year round and summers are a touch hotter/winters colder.
Summers are a lot hotter in Perth than San Diego.

Once I saw them describing a heatwave in San Diego
and residents seem concerned that it reached 87 F (31 C) with 11-16% humidity...
How did they cope?
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Old 07-27-2010, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Wellington and North of South
4,107 posts, read 3,074,419 times
Reputation: 1752
Quote:
Originally Posted by ADGreen View Post
Have to agree with the bolded comment.

I care more about sunshine than temperatures. For me it is about the warming effect of sun on skin, and also the fact it brightens up colours etc - that can be very uplifting.

Grey depresses me - even if it is 20C I would trade that for full sun and 15C.
I fully agree - might even go a little further than that.
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Old 07-27-2010, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Wellington and North of South
4,107 posts, read 3,074,419 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B1987 View Post
The sunniest parts of the UK on the central south coast get between 1900-2000 hours of sun on average. London gets 1630 hours and parts of the Scottish Highlands can get less than 1000.

Here's a picture I found on Flickr, taken in Central London in February. A fairly typical scene.
The 1971-2000 numbers I have give Bognor Regis 1903, and the Channel Isles only a little more than that. Toronto's 2038 is well clear, something even CC can't deny.
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Old 07-27-2010, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Wellington and North of South
4,107 posts, read 3,074,419 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RichardW View Post
July sunshine in Buxton, Derbyshire this year: 78 hours, percentage of maximum possible: 16.2%

It is the dullest for over 40 years. I would swap location with anyone else in the northern hemisphere this summer. Nowhere in the entire northern hemisphere is cloudier than we are this month (even the shetland islands etc...).
Yes, that's an awful total. I saw a simliar complaint about Weston Coyney (?or some name like that) on uk.sci.weather.

Your % implies a monthly duration of about 482 hours, or about 15.6 hours per day - is that the astronomical duration, or the true recordable duration?
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Old 07-27-2010, 08:39 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,691 posts, read 19,705,146 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
Summers are a lot hotter in Perth than San Diego.

Once I saw them describing a heatwave in San Diego
and residents seem concerned that it reached 87 F (31 C) with 11-16% humidity...
How did they cope?
You raise a good point about the SD climate. Right on the coast (say Imperial Beach, the most southerly point on the west coast) 90F (32C) is a heatwave, but less than 5 miles inland 90F is the AVERAGE July high.

It's also more humid than you'd think in summer, often in the 50s and 60s with coastal fog, but with very pleasant temps in the 67-78F range.
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Old 07-27-2010, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Wellington and North of South
4,107 posts, read 3,074,419 times
Reputation: 1752
I agree that this thread has gone way off topic, but it seems to be standard practice in this Weather forum for the more frequent posters to divert the subject back to their well-ridden hobbyhorses. Doesn't bother me either way, though.
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Old 07-27-2010, 09:02 PM
 
14,583 posts, read 12,528,188 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrp5150 View Post
Are there any areas in the US that have a climate similar to what you would find in the San Diego area? 70-80 degree summers and temperatures that rarely drop below the 50's in the winter? I have a health condition that makes my hands extremely sensitive to the cold, so I need to get out of Pennsylvania. I want to move somewhere where it doesn't get cold, but I'd prefer if it didn't get insanely hot like Phoenix. San Diego seems perfect, but it's so damn expensive. Are there any areas like this out there?
The short answer is no.

Very few places in the world have climate's like San Diego's. That climate type is known as the "Mediterranean Climate". Only 2% of the earth's land area falls into this category. Places that would come closest to San Diego temperature wise would be places such as: Perth & Adelaide, Australia; Cape Town, South Africa; Tangier, Casablanca, & Agadir Morocco.

Other places not strictly considered Mediterranean but that have very mild climates (warm winter, fairly cool summer) would be: Sydney, Austraila; Lima, Peru; Arica, Antofagasta, & Iquique, Chile.

There are probably a few others, but since you're not likely to move to another country, this is sort of an academic exercise

Last edited by mysticaltyger; 07-27-2010 at 09:21 PM..
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Old 07-27-2010, 09:07 PM
 
14,583 posts, read 12,528,188 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrp5150 View Post
Yeah, I just happened to check out Eureka the other day. I can't believe the climate there. Crazy how it never seems to get hot or cold there.
They get a lot of cold ocean air from the Pacific, and a lot of fog. You can go 20 or 30 miles inland to get much warmer weather.

Personally, it's a nice place to visit, but I wouldn't want to live there. The area has a strong drug culture (marijuana is grown there). It's an economically depressed area with not many jobs. There is a lot of overcaset weather there, thoughout the year, especially in winter, which a lot of people find depressing. It is sunnier in the inland areas in summer, though.
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