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Old 11-16-2010, 09:05 PM
 
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I first thought of Griffith too. Australia imports Californian Naval oranges, but I haven't really notice any difference between them and the Australian grown ones.

I think it's fair to give Sydney a humid subtropical classification. Sydney doesn't fit with Australia's temperate zone, which gets a drier heat. Borderline temperate/subtropical or a temperate-subtropical description seems best.
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Old 11-16-2010, 10:07 PM
 
Location: USA
151 posts, read 283,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
If you include the arid climates than of course many areas in the temperate zone get far hotter - try Death Valley, for instance. Temp-wise many parts of the upper South get just as hot as the lower south/gulf - like I mentioned Kansas City, Missouri, already averages about 80F in July. This is even more so in parts of China.


Your idea of Sydney is based on second-hand accounts; I've been to Sydney in both winter and summer several times, and the landscape has a vague jungly feel to it. I already said gators are far more cold tolerant than crocs, the fact crocodiles only live in South Florida demonstrates that. And tropical style downpours, the occasional cyclone even, are all features of the climate as far south as Sydney. Yes maybe Sydney might just be warm temperate, but it also has a sub-tropical air about it.

Again…I think you are kind of reaching:

Kansas City, MO has a July (hottest month) of 78.4 (25.8 C)…not 80 F.

KANSAS CITY INTL AP, PLATTE COUNTY, MISSOURI USA Weather History and Climate Data

My main point is that I have been to/lived in tropical climates (Caribbean, Hawaii, Key West, Costa Rica)…heat/humidity/thunderstorms/high dew points/sultry air masses/tropical cyclones…etc are all part of life in these latitudes. The USA Gulf coast and New Orleans have much more of this type of weather/climate than cool temperate Australia around Sydney and NSW. A cyclone in Sydney, when was that? The American Gulf coast has had more tropical cyclones strikes in one year than have hit Sydney in 20 years. Yes, Brisbane has the humid subtropical style climate close/or the same as New Orleans and the Gulf Coast – not Sydney. Any climate that has the hottest months with a mean temp of less than 22 C (72 F) like Sydney is a temperate climate in my book. Brsbane is truly the best match for New Orelans in terms of climate. The only real difference is the ocean off New Orelans gets a bit warmer in summer and is a bit cooler off Brisbane I think.
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Old 11-16-2010, 10:57 PM
 
Location: Cloudchurch, Subantarctica
2,608 posts, read 1,918,086 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trade Wind View Post
Any climate that has the hottest months with a mean temp of less than 22 C (72 F) like Sydney is a temperate climate in my book.
So tropical highland climates averaging 70 F every month of the year are temperate in your estimation?

And Sydney does average over 22 C in the warmest month and has an annual mean over 18 C: Climate statistics for Australian locations

Sure, Sydney, Norfolk Island, etc. are very different from New Orleans, Orlando, etc. but they are still subtropical. A better comparison would be San Diego, at least so far as temps are concerned.
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Old 11-16-2010, 10:58 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,691 posts, read 19,754,058 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trade Wind View Post
Again…I think you are kind of reaching:

Kansas City, MO has a July (hottest month) of 78.4 (25.8 C)…not 80 F.

KANSAS CITY INTL AP, PLATTE COUNTY, MISSOURI USA Weather History and Climate Data

My main point is that I have been to/lived in tropical climates (Caribbean, Hawaii, Key West, Costa Rica)…heat/humidity/thunderstorms/high dew points/sultry air masses/tropical cyclones…etc are all part of life in these latitudes. The USA Gulf coast and New Orleans have much more of this type of weather/climate than cool temperate Australia around Sydney and NSW. A cyclone in Sydney, when was that? The American Gulf coast has had more tropical cyclones strikes in one year than have hit Sydney in 20 years. Yes, Brisbane has the humid subtropical style climate close/or the same as New Orleans and the Gulf Coast – not Sydney. Any climate that has the hottest months with a mean temp of less than 22 C (72 F) like Sydney is a temperate climate in my book. Brsbane is truly the best match for New Orelans in terms of climate. The only real difference is the ocean off New Orelans gets a bit warmer in summer and is a bit cooler off Brisbane I think.
Yes the Gulf coast is probably more sub-tropical than Sydney, thinking about it, but I'd put Sydney on par with somewhere like Cape Hatteras, NC. Most of the South though has more of a temperate climate.
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Old 11-17-2010, 11:59 AM
 
Location: USA East Coast
4,445 posts, read 4,765,486 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Yes the Gulf coast is probably more sub-tropical than Sydney, thinking about it, but I'd put Sydney on par with somewhere like Cape Hatteras, NC. Most of the South though has more of a temperate climate.


I would agree with you there: Sydney, if you look an the annual mean (17 C) is about the same as Cape Hatteras (17 C) or for a bigger city/metro Virginia Beach, VA (16 C). Summers in these two spots are a bit warmer than Sydney and winters a bit cooler, but otherwise they are pretty close in climate/weather. I think it turns much more semi-tropical/subtropical south of North Carolina (Myrtle Beach south to the Gulf and west to Texas). I have been on the Outer Banks many times, and often the heat is quite nice, mostly in the middle 80's and always sunny. Also, there is always a strong breeze out of the Bermuda High, of course when you are on the Outer Banks of North Carolina you are 30 miles out to sea...so of course the wind is even stronger.
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Old 03-14-2011, 12:11 AM
 
Location: Chandler, AZ
22 posts, read 36,704 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deneb78 View Post
yeah I agree.. Melbourne is nowhere like the Pacific NW.. its winters are too warm. Definitely somewhere like San Jose or Fremont, CA except rainfall in all seasons. Adelaide is a bit warmer than Melbourne - probably more like San Luis Obispo or even Santa Barbara. Perth matches well with San Diego.

Darwin I also think doesn't match very well to anywhere in the USA - Virgin Islands maybe?

I believe Perth, AU cannot compare with San Diego, CA as per weather forecast/history, you'll see that Humidity in SD is way higher, really higher.

Does anyone else have any idea which city in the USA can be compared with Perth, AU as far as humidity? Unfortunately, I don't! I'll appreciate if anyone could reply to my note.
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Old 03-14-2011, 01:33 AM
 
Location: PA
19,098 posts, read 9,423,624 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdCanadian View Post
That's actually a bit depressing to hear Darwin is cooler than San Juan in winter.

San Juan in Dec/Jan is barely warm enough for me to consider it "nice and tropical."

A typical Dec/Jan day in San Juan is a steamy-ish 82-84 F (28-29 C) cooling to a 70-72 F (21-22 C) nearly-damp sunrise.
No real chill in the morning, and by midday the sun feels realiably hottish, the shade is very warm.
By evening, (7-9pm) shirt collar will stick to my neck with excersize, but will go dry when I become sedentary; perfect!
I know this is a necro post I'm replying to, but seeing as you're still posting in this topic and I'm a native of Puerto Rico, you missed one city that has the same temperatures as Darwin You missed Ponce, our 2nd largest city (that not a lot of people care about)

Climate Comparison for Ponce, PR and Darwin, Australia

As you can see in the graph, Ponce, Puerto Rico and Darwin have the same annual temperature.

If you ever visit PR in the winter again, if you want really warm in winter, go to Ponce next time it is much warmer there any day of the year compared to San Juan (I was raised east of San Juan btw)
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Old 01-27-2012, 04:41 PM
 
2 posts, read 1,034 times
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Bamaga, Quensland located in Far North Queensland, has equatorial climate that is not found anywhere in USA with winter lows around 73F
Bamaga, Queensland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 01-27-2012, 07:56 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,691 posts, read 19,754,058 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saguaro View Post
Bamaga, Quensland located in Far North Queensland, has equatorial climate that is not found anywhere in USA with winter lows around 73F
Bamaga, Queensland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
I would include the Daintree area as equatorial too...
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Old 01-27-2012, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
2,884 posts, read 1,523,674 times
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^^Yep the Daintree area (relatively small area around Innisfail, Queensland) is strictly speaking the only equatorial/tropical rainforest climate in Australia, as its the only one that meats the minimum 60mm / 2.36" rainfall for each month as well as temperature requirements. Winters there are noticeably drier though. Bamaga has very consistent temperatures but low rainfall in the dry season which prevents it from being termed equatorial.

Innisfail, Queensland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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