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Old 12-25-2010, 07:14 AM
 
Location: motueka nz
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Not sure if this question has been asked already, but what temps do you think the upper limit of a cool summer would be. I'm thinking 14C-25C (58F-77F) would be about the temps that a cool summer becomes a warm summer, here has 12C-23C as the warmest month, so clearly a cool summer place. Also, at which temps would a cool summer become a cold summer?
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Old 12-25-2010, 07:17 AM
 
Location: Buxton, England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoney63 View Post
Not sure if this question has been asked already, but what temps do you think the upper limit of a cool summer would be. I'm thinking 14C-25C (58F-77F) would be about the temps that a cool summer becomes a warm summer, here has 12C-23C as the warmest month, so clearly a cool summer place. Also, at which temps would a cool summer become a cold summer?
Buxton, average temps of 10 - 17C, I would probably consider a cold summer. Averages for your location you posted are about the same as London.
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Old 12-25-2010, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Cloudchurch, Subantarctica
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In terms of 24-hour monthly means I would say:

Hot summer: Over 22 C
Warm summer: 16 - 22 C
Cool summer: 10 - 16 C
Cold summer: Below 10 C

The 10 C summer isotherm defines polar climates while the 22 C isotherm defines humid subtropical and hot summer continental climates. So I think my definitions fit well with Koppen's climate classification system.
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Old 12-25-2010, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Two Rivers, Wisconsin
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Our summers are considered cool by most people. Last summer was the exception but generally we don't see 80, and I think high 50's, low 60's is cool for summer.
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Old 12-25-2010, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
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I agree with ChesterNZ's definitions. According to that, Vancouver would fit into the warm summer category with an average July and August temperature of 17C.
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Old 12-25-2010, 03:53 PM
 
Location: London, UK
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I'd say :
Hot summer : average max >30C
Warm summer : average max >24C
Cool summer : average max <23C

I think the average max is much more important to define how warm a summer is, especially at a higher latitude or in a dry climate where you can get bright hot days with cooler nights.
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Old 12-25-2010, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Cloudchurch, Subantarctica
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dhdh View Post
I'd say :
Hot summer : average max >30C
Warm summer : average max >24C
Cool summer : average max <23C

I think the average max is much more important to define how warm a summer is, especially at a higher latitude or in a dry climate where you can get bright hot days with cooler nights.
I think there's some truth to that. But minimum temps are also relevant to sleeping comfort and so forth. Another useful metric is the AHS heat zone which is based on the mean number of days per year over 30 C.
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Old 12-25-2010, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
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I don't think Vancouver should be considered to have a warm summer. The coldest July / August month I experienced was 67.4F and it had cool days but was still on the warm side. I'd say a good boundary is about 66F (19C). Anything warmer most days will have shorts & T-shirt weather (at least in the middle of the day) and houses should stay fairly warm.
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Old 12-25-2010, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
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Well, I don't think Vancouver has cold summers like somewhere like Reykjavik or the Aleutians. It's certainly not hot either and so that's why I think warm summer is best description. It's only on the coolest days of the summer that I can't walk comfortably outside in t-shirt and shorts here.
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Old 12-25-2010, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Two Rivers, Wisconsin
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Around here they wear shorts and t-shirts for the 50's, cracks me up in April when I'm still in jeans and a sweatshirt, lots of people have shorts on already. Tough bunch these Wisconsonites!
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